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Vol. LI. 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, JULY 6, 1895. 



Number 1. 



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FACTORIES re-opening, wages going up, prosperity 
returning— and under a Democratic tariff, too. Major 

McKinley hus reason to lie anxious about that carefully 
fostered and highly protected boom of bis. 

THE Call has been doing good work in exposing a 
number of swindling lottery concerns that have im- 
upon the unwary. The "suckers" are pitifully 
numerous, and they are by no means confined to the rural 
districts, 

THE subdivision of the old Bay District Track into 
residence and building lots will be a great gaiu to the 
Richmond district. The maintenance of the race track in 
that locality has been a decided hindrance to the improve- 
ment of the neighborhood for residence purposes. 

CALIFORNIA should be well represented at the Inter- 
national Exposition in Atlanta next winter. The con- 
vention of Supervisors, which meets in this city on the 
loth instant, will no doubt be well attended. The op- 
portunity for advertising California in the coming exhibi- 
tion must not be lost. Every county in the State should 
contribute, so as to make a thoroughly representative dis- 
play of our resources and products. 

SNOTHER one of those exciting episodes that disgrace 
the Bay District track occurred last Tuesday, in 
which the jockeys and the buncos captured the swag by 
crooked work. The managers concluded to make an ex- 
ample, in order to retain the confidence of the public, by 
suspending and fining some of the jockeys, but that did not 
right the wrong by restoring the money to those who had 
been swindled by these turf sharps. 

WHENEVER Emperor William struts across the stage 
of Europe, jingling his sword and proclaiming his de- 
termination to preserve peace by being always ready for 
war, some angry Frenchman rises to remark that there is 
still an Alsace-Lorraine question. The opening of the 
North Sea canal has stirred up fresh bitterness between 
France and' Germany, and another bloody struggle be- 
tween the two nations is only a question of time. 

WE are improving. None of the newspapers has yet 
accused Judge Ross of being a tool of the plutocracy 
because he sustained Mrs. Stanford's demurrer in the Gov- 
ernment's suit to recover $15,000,000 of the late Senator's 
estate. This is almost unprecedented. Judge Ross is to 
be congratulated, and so are the people of California. 
With the betterment of journalistic manners we shall find 
it easier to get men of first-rate ability for the Bench. 

FROM Southern California comes the information that 
the orange crop of 1895 has been disposed of, to the 
extent of more than 5,000 carloads, at prices satisfactory 
to the growers. From this source alone the southern 
part of the State has received this year nearly $2,000,000. 
It is to be noted that seedling oranges and Mediterranean 
Sweets failed to sell this season, a fact that should not 
be lost upon Northern California horticulturists who pro- 
pose to set out orange orchards. The Washington Navel 
and other early varieties are what should be planted in 
the northern counties having a ' ' citrus belt. " 



THE good sense and Brmness of Chairman Gould, of the 
Democratic stair Committee, have prevented whal 
threatened to be a serious rupture in the ranks of the 

party in California. In refusing to call a State convention 
to discuss the silver question, Mr. Could has incurred the 
displeasure of a few hot-headed extremists among the 

supporters of free silver, but his conservative course is 
doubtless endorsed by the mass of sensible Democrats. 



ftUDITOR Broderick is somewhat of a financial strate- 
gist, and by the application of his genius he has pro- 
duced a surplus in the City Treasury for the payment of 
official salaries where a few days ago there was afrowning 
deficit. The May warrants have all been paid, and those 
for June can be settled immediately, leaving a surplus still 
in the Treasury. Broderick ought to be transferred from 
the Auditorship of the City and County of San Francisco 
to the position of Secretary of the United States Treasury. 

THE Examiner did a good work when it started a sub- 
scription for the poor who were burned out by the 
great fire of last week. Heading the list with $500 of its 
own money, within forty-eight hours it collected nearly 
$5,000. It was a good-hearted, timely thing to do, and the 
public appreciates it. The bluif of a clothing house offer- 
ing to give $50 if the Examiner would send for it, and doing 
this after the subscription list was closed, was a beggarly 
thing to do. Of course it was done only to get a little free 
advertising. 

THE Fourth of July parade in this city was one of the 
largest and most orderly ever witnessed, and was a 
credit to those who had the management under their 
charge. The military display was large and brilliant, from 
the fact that the Trades Unions had refused to take part 
in the celebration. There were representatives of many 
of the societies and organizations in line, and every detail 
seemed to be perfectly arranged. The display of the Stars 
and Stripes was as profuse as the people were enthusiastic. 
The evidences of industry and business exhibited in floats 
were very creditable. The bonfires and illuminations in 
the evening in all- portions of the city were marred by the 
weather, but from this demonstration and the patriotism 
displayed there is no danger of the people forgetting the 
proper honors due to those who proclaimed the Declaration 
of Independence. 

THE stories which have come to hand this week in re- 
gard to the massing of Russian troops aud ships 
at Vladivostock and other places, in readiness for an 
attack upon the Japanese, are substantially untrue, 
though they contain what may be termed the germs of a 
substratum of truth. Russian troops and ships were 
massed in that direction toward the close of the Chinese 
war, and with the avowed intention of protecting Russian 
interests if they were menaced in the settlement of the 
terms of peace. Those ships and men remain massed 
along the Russian frontier, but just at present there is no 
prospect of a conflict between the Russians and the Japan- 
ese. Russia is playing a deep and complicated game in 
the Orient, and one which she does not expect to com- 
pletely win for some time. So far she has taken all the 
tricks that have been won in the game, and she can afford 
to wait for the balance. Russian diplomacy is continuous 
and deliberate; its ends may be somewhat concealed, but 
they are fixed and there is a steady effort to move toward 
them. ^Eventually, this policy may lead to war, but there 
is nj^SpR^airance of it just now. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1895. 



THE DECISION IN THE STANFORD CASE. 

ftS was to be expected, the suit of the United States 
against the estate of the late Senator Stanford 
was thrown out of court by Judge Ross. His action in 
sustaining the demurrer of the defendant amounts to that, 
taken in connection with the opinion he rendered in the 
matter. While he granted leave to amend the bill or com- 
plaint, lie plainly expressed his belief that no amendment 
of the pleadings can make good the Government's claim. 
In other words, he reached the conclusion that the suit 
had not. a legal leg to stand upon. It should be under- 
stood by everybody that a demurrer is confined to points 
of law alone, and raises no questions of fact. It assumes, 
for the purpose of the argument, that allegations of fact, 
in the complaint or bill, are true. And in this case the. 
demurrer raised the issue that the Government, upon its 
own showing of facts, had no legal cause of action. It 
follows that if a demurrer be sustained, there can be no 
use in proceeding to try questions of fact, since to prove 
the allegations made could be productive of no legal 
result. The opinion of Judge Ross is so clear and logical 
that it leaves among lawyers no room to think that any 
further action will be taken by the Government against 
the, estate. In fact, there has been no reason to doubt, as 
we have said before, that the whole proceeding was in the 
nature of a farce, being merely a concession to the clamor 
of demagogues, in order that the administration might not 
sutler in the estimation of a certain class of people. It is 
exceedingly unlikely that the President, or the heads of 
the law department at Washington, had any faith in the 
validity of the claim. Fortunately, the case came before 
a judge who has the courage of his convictions, and who in 
previous actions had not hesitated to decide against the 
Southern Pacific Company, according to his legal judg- 
ment. The high standing and demonstrated independence 
and fearlessness of Judge Ross leave the anti-railroad peo- 
ple no chance for successful criticism of his motives in his 
decision of the Stanford case, and the opinion he has 
rendered will have a far-reaching effect. It applies as 
well to any other claim that might be brought by the 
Government against stockholders of the Central Pacific. 
It defines the relation existing between the original 
stockholders of the corporation and the Government, and 
also the nature of the contract embodied in the Act of 
1862, by which Congress aided the construction of the 
Central Pacific. 

No Liability Of The main question before Judge Ross in 
The the Stanford case was whether the 

Stockholders. stockholders of the Central Pacific, 
when that corporation accepted a grant 
of land and subsidy bonds by the Government, took upon 
themselves any individual responsibility. This he has 
answered in the negative. He found that the Act of 1K62 
was in the nature of a specific contract, between the 
Government, and the corporations concerned, involving on 
the part, of the latter an obligation to repay the principal 
and the interest of the bonds. And for this obligation, the 
decision holds all the property of the Central Pacific to be 
liable. But it points out that there is no personal 
liability of stockholders at common law, and that, no such 
individual liability was created or implied by the Act of 
Congress creating the contract in question. Further, the 
decision holds that, the contract, must be construed by its 
own terms, and not by what the laws of California may 
have provided in relation to the liability of stockholders of 
corporations. Yet, in this regard, the decision points out 
that the California statute respecting such" personal 
liability is too vague to afford any rule by which a court 
could be governed, and hence is of no effect. Therefore, 
as the Act of Congress did not provide for any individual 
liability of stockholders, none can be held to exist. The 
court did not go into the question as to whether the action 
was barred by lapse, of time, remarking that it was need- 
less to consider that aspect of the case. This decision has 
the effect of relieving all doubts that may have existed as 
to the future of the Stanford University. Mrs. Stanford 
will now feel free to carry out her cherished aim of exe- 
cuting her late hushand'si plans and wishes with respect, to 
this institution, which she has sustained in great part out 
of her private fortune, the proceeds of the land endow- 



ment having thus far proved insufficient. The State is a 
distinct gainer by the decision, and with few exceptions 
the people are well pleased to find that the suit of the 
Government has come to naught. In respect to the 
settlement of the obligations of the Central and Union 
Pacific railroads to the Government, the decision cuts no 
figure. Should the Government force a forfeiture, upon 
the maturity of the debt, it must satisfy the first mort- 
gage bonds, and thus itself incur a greater debt than the 
road is worth. The outcome of the whole matter will pro- 
bably be the passage of a refunding bill, by which the debt 
will be gradually paid, in the course of years, at a fair 
rate of interest, and without loss to the Government. And, 
oddly enough, it was contended by Judge McKissick, 
special counsel for the Government in the Stanford case, 
that the forfeiture clause of the Act of 1862 is invalid and 
of no force; that the Government's sole remedy is 
against the stockholders of the corporations. Since 
Judge Ross has found that the stockholders are not liable, 
and Judge McKissick insists that there can be no forfeiture, 
the Government is left, it appears, without any recourse 
for the payment of the bonds and accrued interest. 

A Hero Time was when the death of Professor Huxley 
of would have given satisfaction to multitudes of 

Science, pious minds, but that time passed long ago, 
and the venerable man of science sank to 
rest, as General Grant did, respected by his ancient foes 
as well as by those who had fought under his flag. The 
battles between fact and faith do not last as long in this 
age as they were wont to do in the days when the truths 
written by Copernicus were placed on the Index Expurga- 
torius, when Galileo was made to kneel, and with his hand 
on the Scriptures, curse the doctrine that the earth moves 
around the sun, and when Bruno was burned for maintain- 
ing the plurality of worlds. Knowledge spreads faster 
now, and science has won so many victories that the 
ecclesiastic is more eager to avoid a contest with it than 
engage in one. It took some hundreus of years to con- 
vince the Church that the earth was not flat, and that the 
sky, just overhead, was not the floor of heaven. Only 
when the ship of Magellan circumnavigated the globe and 
gave physical demonstration of the untrustworthiness of 
the divine revelation in matters of science was the cos- 
mogany of Genesis abandoned. Huxley led the forces of 
reason in the last great conflict with faith. Men yet 
scarcely middle-aged can recall the uproar that was raised 
by the publication of Darwin's "Origin of Species" and 
"Descent of Man," books that rank, and will continue to 
rank, with Newton's "Prmeipia" as epoch makers in 
human thought, in conceptions of the universe. It was 
Huxley who popularized Darwin. The monster himself 
was content to let the storm of ignorance, prejudice and 
fear rage around his books while he calmly continued 
to question nature, seeking from herself and not from 
heaven the revelation of her secrets. But Huxley was 
born with a militant spirit, and he went up aggressively 
against the beaters of the theological tom-toms, and 
made evolution understood by everybody. As he himself 
has recorded, he subordinated his ambition for independent 
scientific fame to the popularization of knowledge — "to the 
endless series of battles and skirmishes over evolution, and 
to untiring opposition to that ecclesiastical spirit, that 
clericalism, which in England, as everywhere else, and to 
whatever denomination it may belong, is the deadly enemy 
of science." 

Prof. Huxley Twenty years ago, when he began to do 
on battle for Darwinism, the religious world, 

Darwinism. the literary world, and a good part of 
the scientific world, were arrayed against 
it. He lived to see it completely accepted not only by 
men of science, but by the intelligent of all callings — even by 
theologians who are possessed of the knowledge that is to be 
found in the encyclopedias. The clergyman who now in- 
veighs against evolution must resign himself to being classed 
with Brother Jasper, of Richmond, who, for insisting that 
" the sun do move " — the belief of Christendom for a dozen 
centuries, and for dissenting from which the stake was long 
the. reward — was ridiculed the world over. But though 
Huxley beheld the acceptance of evolution, its incorpora- 
tion as a commonplace into the minds of educated men, he 



July 6. 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



m with the clerical fix- He saw that 
(■irit of hostility Bur 
i-hing in his lucid 
and bumor 1 i:n>t the tireless effects of tin- hreth- 

ri'ii t.i mal ipturos tin ol truth in ma- 

thai "around Iho birthplace nf every 
..TV theologians lie thick as strangled 
;t the cradle of Heroi ea His lance was al- 
ii rest, ami the Pope, GladstonB, the Duke of Argyll, 
or any defender of the faith aa it bora upon science, ever 
found him ready for the joust Hi- intellect, his learning, 
hi- extraordinary command of the pen. his pure ami useful 
life, iron him the esteem of even his bitterest adversaries. 
gists bowed to him as the first among them Profes- 
sor Jordan, in a recent lecture here, did justice to his 
solidity, his thoroughness, by remarking that through 
Huxley "Man's Place in Nature was written in the six- 
ties, hut little has been athled to what it contains up to 
this day. 

Remembering the riot of dissent, the hurricanes of de- 
nunciation, which Darwinism evoked but a quarter of a 
century ago, and the angry abuse that was thrown from 
myriad pulpits upon Darwin's chief disciple and expounder, 
on.- cannot but marvel at the change that has come over 
thought and feeling. Huxley goes to his sleep honored 
and eulogized by the press, and the pulpit, if it does not 
participate in the expressions of reverence for the bravest 
soldier of science that the nineteenth century has produced, 
at least, for its own sake, remains silent. The world does 
move. 

An Innovator The fashion in managing editors of what 
in are known to themselves as "great metro- 

Journalism, politan journals," is changing. For a good 
many years it has not been expected that 
the proprietors of these imposing publications should be 
able to write, though they have modestly accepted the 
honors due to journalists. Gradually this immunity from 
the pen extended also to the managing editor. The assump- 
tion has been that a man oppressed by the responsibility 
of directing a daily newspaper has no time to write. And 
this is generally true. The burden of telling others what 
to write and seeing that they write it well, is certainly 
heavy enough for any pair of shoulders. But though Na- 
poleon did not carry a musket, he was as familiar with the 
manual of arms as any private in his army. The news- 
paper proprietor is essentially a man of business, and it is 
not needed that he should be acquainted with the minor 
art of composition, but the managing editor who cannot 
write when occasion requires is as incongruous as a leader 
of a band who could not resign the baton for an instrument. 
In San Francisco most of the managing editors who have 
flourished during the past decade, when ousted from their 
places of command were helpless. They could not make 
their living with the pen. But, as has been said, the fash- 
ion is changing. John P. Young, of the Chronicle, is a case 
in point. Besides conducting the paper with close atten- 
tion he has made himself an authority among bimetallists, 
and on Sunday last published a whole book on the silver 
question. It was ably written, too, and when put between 
covers it will have a large circulation, since it gives just 
the kind of information for which the public now is eager. 
Those who are not silver men will dissent from his conclu- 
sions, of course, but that does not detract from the merit 
of the performance, which discloses deep and broad study. 
It is as an innovator in local journalism, however, that 
Mr. Young is most interesting. A managing editor who 
can write startles somewhat. 

The Late Fire It is greatly to be hoped that the lessons 

and of the late fire will not be lost on the 

Its Lessons. government and the people of this city. 

There is no manner of doubt that the tire 

could have been checked, without great loss of property, 

had there been ample supply of water, and brick walls in 

the place of the flimsy frame structures which furnished 

fuel to the advancing flames. There is sore need of many 

more hydrants, and of a wide extension of the fire limits, 

so far as the construction of new buildings is concerned; 

also of a more efficient fire department. San Francisco 

has been exceedingly fortunate, thus far, that her miles of 



wooden buildings have escaped destruction in a great . on 
HagraUon. This exemption cannot always last. In the 
burning of a few blocks of wooden buildings south of 
Market -ttvet. .1 wanting has been gfiven that should not 
lie allowed to pa-- mil led. The fiction that redwood 

buildings do not admit of a widespread conflagration can 
scarcely survive this experience. And. in view of the fact 
that redwood is commonly used as kindling in this city, it 

ran scarcely be said that the old notion as to it- not burn- 
ing well had ever much foundation. The penny-wise. 

pound-foolish policy of scrimping the supply of hydrants 

and water mains ha- also undergone a severe shock. The 

insurance companies will be disposed to increase, rather 

than to reduce their premium charges, as a result of the 
late lire, and it behooves the property-owners to unite in 
demanding of the Supervisors and the Mayor prompt and 

intelligent action, so a- to furnish needed protection. The 
public are completely out of patience with the niggardly 

notion that stints the tire department to a handful of 
regularly employed men. The tax-payers call for a better 
service. 



The Salvation The authorities of Colorado Springs have 
Army been bullied out of their good sense by 

A Nuisance. Captain Blanche Cox of the Salvation 
Army. Arrested for obstructing the 
streets and convicted of the offense, she would neither pay 
a fine nor file a bond on appeal. She insisted on going to 
jail, being inflamed with a passion for amateur martyr- 
dom. The Judge weakly yielded to the outcry raised by 
the contemplated "outrage" of her imprisonment, and has 
discharged her. In consequence, she and her companions 
now triumphantly break the peace of Colorado Springs at 
will. The Salvation Army is becoming iusolent. It has 
been permitted to offer up its prayers on the street cor- 
ners a n d make wide its phylacteries because of the general 
recognition that the organization was sincerely zealous, 
reached classes of the population beyond the influence of 
the churches, and did considerable practical good. But 
the novelty of its bizarre street performances has worn 
off. The patronage and approval which it has received 
have rather turned its head, and there is an element of de- 
fiance in its drum-beating, crowd-collecting usages which 
exasperates. It is tolerably plain that evolution is at 
work on the Salvation Army. It is no more boisterous 
in its methods than was the Methodist sect, which has now 
become as demure and conventional as any of the others. 
In time the Army will become merely one of the innumer- 
able religious denominations. Already it is growing to be 
more exclusive than it was, and by drawing its garments 
away from the very lowest class of sinners is relinquishing 
its distinctive reason for existence and making room for a 
successor. Pride and respectability are doing their dis- 
tinctive and refining work, as they have done with all 
other sects. Therefore there is less excuse than formerly 
for the parading and noise, which are sinking into mere 
forms, and call not much more significantly to the uncon- 
verted than does that other nuisance, the church bell. The 
Salvation Army should be taught its place. However 
much respect one may have had for its fervor, nobody of 
sense ever thought of respecting the intelligence of the 
uniformed shouters. If their religious emotions cannot be 
gratified without the clashing of cymbals and the blare of 
wind instruments, consideration for the nerves of other 
people require that the cymbals shall be clashed and the 
instruments blown in their places of worship and not on 
the streets. The Salvation Army has no better right to 
fill the thoroughfares with intolerable noise than the Jews 
would have, or the Presbyterians, or the Theosophists, 
should any of these bodies of religionists take it into their 
heads to advertise their tenets with fife, and drum, and 
bugle. Ten days in jail would have done the brainless Miss 
Cox good, and she would have been no more of a martyr 
than'any other person equally indifferent to the peace of a 
community who had been sent up. The Army has had the 
privilege of making the streets of San Francisco its own 
quite long enough. Like other people they should be re- 
quired to get special permission for processions on great 
occasions. The clangor of the gongs and the bellowing of 
the extorters of the Army may be pleasing to the Lord, 
but He has the advantage of not being human. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1895. 



Water Power The rapid development of electrical 

and engineering bids fail- to greatly aid Cali- 

Electricity. forma. Hitherto the water power of the 
State has been but little used, owing to 
the fact that in most localities where it exists it is practi- 
cally unavailable by the old methods, which required its 
utilization on the spot, or by which, its distant employment 
was made exceedingly costly. In some instances water 
was carried several miles in pipes or ditches, for the pur- 
pose of operating water wheels, but this manner of utiliza- 
tion restricted its employment within comparatively 
narrow limits, and could only be adopted where the power 
was applied at an altitude lower than that of the source 
of the water. Yet for a number of years past water 
power has been successfully employed in the Bodie dis- 
trict for the generation of electricity, which is conveyed 
by wires a long distance to operate a quartz mill and 
hoisting works, at an altitude much greater than that of 
the stream. Since the inception of this enterprise, water 
power has likewise been converted into electricity at 
several localities in Southern California. But until re- 
cently no attempt had been made to make much use of the 
tremendous power of the rivers that flow down from the 
Sierra Nevada to the great valleys of the Sacramento and 
the San Joaquin. Now, however, the electrical works at 
Folsom, on the American river, are partially in operation, 
and are supplying a thousand horse-power. Three other 
great generators will soon be in working order there, and 
before the close of the year Sacramento may be supplied 
with more electric power than it will know what to do 
with. The water power created by the dam across the 
American river at the penitentiary is sufficient for the 
creation of a vastly greater flow of electricity than the 
present or prospective machinery at Folsom will produce. 
It would seem that with such au unlimited power at com- 
mand, and at ti-ifling cost, the development of manufactur- 
ing in the district thus favored should go forward rapidly. 
Like utilization of water power for long-distance trans- 
mission of electricity will eventually be made on the Upper 
Sacramento, the Feather, Yuba, Bear, Mokelumne, 
Russian and other rivers. It is well within the limits of 
possibility that electric power shall some day be brought 
to this city from the streams of the Sierra or the Coast 
Range. Electricians have confidently predicted as much 
iu the case of Niagara. It is already said to be practic- 
able to bring electric power at low cost into San Francisco 
by developing it at the Mt. Diablo coal mines. In Nevada 
county the mines at Grass Valley and Nevada City will 
shortly be operated by electric power developed from the 
water of the South Yuba. 

The Developments The political situation in the British 
of Isles is unfolding itself very slowly. 

British Politics. The new Cabinet has been selected, 
and its members have taken office. 
Several of them have received the customary constitutional 
endorsement from their constituencies, supplies are in pro- 
cess of being voted, and it is expected that Parliament 
will be dissolved in a few days. All these things, however, 
are in the nature of routine, and throw no light upon the 
new situation. There is no utterance of Lord Salisbury, 
or of Mr. Balfour, or of any other recognized leader in the 
Tory ranks, to give any indication of the course which the 
new Ministry proposes to pursue in regard to the variety 
of public questions that must lie dealt with, or as to what 
especial issues it proposes to create. Beaconsh'eld was 
once represented by Punch as saying, at the opening of 
Parliament, that the policy of the Conservative party 
would be to rely for support upon the patriotism and intel- 
ligence of a chivalrous people. Lord Salisbury and his 
associates will, however, need to be a little more definite 
than that. Being in office, the duty is upon them to tell 
their countrymen what course they propose to pursue in 
regard to the various moot questions of public policy with 
which they are confronted. For the past three years 
they have been in Opposition and under the political sys- 
tem of Great Britain their principal function has been to 
rail at the Ministry in general terms. Now it is necessary 
that they unfold an explicit policy of their own, and that 
is a proceeding which will be watched with a great deal of 
interest. Has Mohammed come to the mountain or has 
the mountain gone to Mohammed ? In other words, have the 



Tories become dissentient Liberals or have the dissentient 
Liberals become Tories ? When the dissentient Liberals 
crossed over to the Tory side of the House of Commons, 
they protested that they were still in full sympathy with 
the Liberal party and the Liberal sentiment of the coun- 
try upon all but one question, and that was Home Rule. 
That was quite a number of years ago, and since then 
these men have supported the Tories upon all party ques- 
tions. They have professed, however, that in doing this 
they were merely actuated by a patriotic desire to defeat 
the possibility of Home Rule legislation, and not by an- 
tagonism toward general Liberal legislation or approval 
of the general policy of the Tories. Throughout all tins 
time they have kept up the appearance of a party organi- 
zation separate and distinct from those with whom they 
were acting. The late Lord Randolph Churchill described 
their position toward the Tories as that of a useful crutch. 
At the time that apt phrase was employed the dissentient 
Liberals were supporting a Tory Ministry in power and 
were voting to help Tory legislation into the national 
statute book. They held no part in the Tory administra- 
tion, however, and always excused their support of Tory 
measures as being a necessity forced upon them (13' the 
exigencies of the Home Rule controversy. This situation 
is now entirely changed. The dissentient Liberals have 
either become Tories or the Tories have become dissentient 
Liberals. Which of these alternatives is the correct one 
will, necessarily, be indicated as soon as the new Ministry 
outlines its position upon current issues. If the Duke of 
Devonshire and Mr. Chamberlain propose as responsible 
Ministers of the Crown, to endorse a Tory policy, then 
they have become Tories, and the sham of dissentient liber- 
alism is at an end. 

The Liberal Leaders Upon the Liberal side, also, there 
Evidently is room for a great deal of clarifica- 

Much Mixed Up. tion. Lord Roseberry and Sir Wil- 
liam Harcourt are preparing tor 
the tourneys of the hustings, just as though no question 
had been raised as to which was the Knight ami which 
was the Esquire. Indeed, the only hint which has been 
dropped, so far, which in anywise alludes to the causes 
that led a Ministry to accept a scratch vote as an expres- 
sion of want of confidence is to be found in a banquet 
speech remark by Lord Roseberry, to the effect that he 
had tasted of the sweets of office without power, 
but not of the sweets of office with power. That 
remark is susceptible of a construction that gives it a 
wealth of meaning in addition tc that which has been given 
to it. The Liberal party has a hard fight in front of it, 
and, in order to stand a fair chance of winning, it should 
let the people understand clearly what its future policy 
and who its future leader is to be. 

Curious Developments The death of ex-President Peixoto, 
In of Brazil, within a day or so of 

Brazilian Affairs. the suicide of his old enemy, Ad- 
miral da Gama, is a curious in- 
stance of the irony of fate. It may be added that the re- 
moval of both men from the activities of life is a blessing to 
Brazil. Both men were self-seekers and disturbers. Of 
the two da llama was the cleaner handed and Peixoto the 
more dangerous. Those who are attempting to hold 
Peixoto up to view as a broad-minded patriot are making the 
same ridiculous mistake that they make when they hold da 
Gamaupasa BenedictArnokl toward the Republic. Peixoto 
was not a patriot, and in his conflict with da Gama and da 
Mello the maintenance of republican institutions of govern- 
ment was not in issue. A real republic does not as yet 
exist in Brazil. The men who betrayed and deposed Dom 
Pedro were military adventurers, and they have been 
quarreling ever since over the division of the authority 
they had seized. That was the secret of the desperate 
conflict between da Mello. da Gama, and Peixoto. Those 
who affect to believe that Peixoto was struggling to main- 
tain the Republic and the two Admirals seeking to restore 
the monarchy, are either tiresome idiots or conscienceless 
falsifiers. Peixoto's aim was to become dictator of the 
country; the object of da Gama and da Mello was to de- 
stroy Peixoto — and afterwards to quarrel among them- 
selves as to which one should take his place. It is under- 
stood that da Mello is alive still, but he is out of sight and 
harmless. 



July 6, 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Quit «nd In some res 
Durt C«rt». taken by tti 
an advai 
clined to think that tin- remedy 



I sweeping under 

'units of this city may be 

mi the whole we are in 

than the disease. 



Any em • whose business keeps him much upon the Btreets 
' fail to have observed with what determined vigor 
the men employed to do the sweeping drive the dirt to- 
ward the pavements, utterly regardless of the passers by; 

in fact, if one happens to stop and speak to an acquaint- 
ance, the sweeper appears to take a savage de- 
light in endeavoring to choke one with the accumulated 

debris. If the streets could l«- swept shortly after sprink- 
ling, no inconvenience would arise, but as the roadway is 
always allowed to become perfectly dry, this army of sweep- 
ers becomes a nuisance. The sweeping should be done before 

!• A. If., or after ti p. \i. When we have a few warm days in 
gaton it is torture to have to pass along the streets 
where a regiment of sweepers is at work. Again among 
the other nuisances of city existence, the dust cart as it is 
at present managed, may lay claim to a prominent place. 
In itself it is a useful and indeed a necessary institution. 
and were it rigorously confined within the limits that 
nature obviously assigns to it. no one would have cause to 
complain. In theory a cart for the removal of house refuse 
is truly admirable; it is in the practice that our scavengers 
break down. Why. for instance, should the dust-man's 
favorite time for calling at our houses or places of busi- 
ness be when the day is far advanced, and he is almost sure 
of meeting some one either entering or leaving the prem- 
ises? To be saluted when entering a restauraut with an 
odor of decayed cabbage stalks and to have the wind play- 
fully deposit a powder composed of fine cinder-sittings in 
the corner of each eye is one of the penalties we have to 
pay for giving too much scope to the unfettered genius of 
the dust contractor. The carts are supposed to be pro- 
vided with safety lids or flaps, which are intended to pre- 
vent any portion of their contents from escaping into the 
circumambient atmosphere; but daily experience proves 
that the flaps are either non-existent or fail to realize the 
purpose of their creators. It is impossible to estimate 
how much actual ill-health, or at the very least, how much 
lowering of the vital powers is caused by the evil effluvia 
and the irritating and poisonous particles which float into 
the common air of our streets through persistence in an 
antiquated system of street sweeping and dust carts. 

Society and the It is a peculiarity of the present social 
Pursuit system that the best men are commonly 

of Wealth. the least rewarded. It has been so 
through the ages, with the exception of 
a few ancient republics which did not endure, and of some 
small and scattered communities still in existence. What 
is usually termed civilization enlarges the opportunites for 
selfish enterprise to roll up private fortunes, and society 
everywhere is quick to recognize wealth as a symbol of 
merit in some form. But it must ever remain a question 
whether there is not something radically wrong in the con- 
dition of things which permits to grasping selfishness the 
chief share of the honors and advantages of this world, 
while the patriot and the philanthropist must often strug- 
gle for bread. The Christian world, so called, professes to 
follow the teachings of Jesus, who strove to inculcate the 
doctrines of equality, humility and the brotherhood of man. 
But the Christian world, in practice, is engaged in the 
selfish scramble for wealth, and its working maxim is that 
the devil may take the hindmost. There is in San Fran- 
cisco a Christian missionary who has given away a fortune 
in charity; a man who was reared in luxury, who is a 
classical scholar, and yet content to do what he conceives 
to be his Master's work by laboring, early and late, to 
spread the gospel among the poor and the lowly. There is 
something sublime in the unselfishness, the devotion and 
humility of this man of rare accomplishments and Christ- 
like humility, whose modesty is as shrinking as Dr. Dille's 
love of notoriety is open and notorious. Yet such is the 
quality of our social system that most of our professing 
Christians, if they knew this strange being with the heart 
of gold, would look down upon him, wondering at his self- 
abnegation, his lack of personal ambition. They would 
say, because of this marvelous self-effacement, which is 
the most distinguished quality in a character altogether 



lovely, that he lack-, the essentials of "success in life.'' 

This noble man will \i\ e and die unhonored and in poverty, 
despised by the multitude of money chasers for the very 
attributes which elevate htm far above their sordid level. 
Even the prea t of whom have ;i ki en eve to the 

nursing of their salaries, will look down upon him a 
whose shabby garments and battered hat are scarcely in 
keeping with the traditions of the "cloth." The truth 
may as well he confessed that the quality which the 
Christian wc nil lens! admires is Christian humility, and 
that those who follow most closelj the footsteps of the 
Redeemer society leaves farthest in the rear. 

Til K Kriig-.lorgensen rifle, with which the United stales 
troops at this station arc being equipped, is credited 

with a range of three miles, li is ;i terribly effective 

weapon, its long and slender bullets having a wonderful de- 
gree of penetration. An improved smokeless powder is 
employed in this arm, so that while its caliber is but three- 
tenths of an inch the barrel is not liable to fouling, as it 
would be with powder of the old sort. At short range the 
projectile from this rifle is capable of passing through half 
a dozen men. And at long range it inflicts even a more 
severe wound than at comparatively close quarters. One 
soldier armed with this guu is equal in efficiency to two 
men with the old Springfield rifle. 

GENERAL Schofield, Commander of the Army of the 
United States, does not agree with those of our able 
editors who ridicule the least preparation for war on the 
part of this country, and who are fond of insisting that no 
foreign nation will ever dare to attack us. The General 
says that twice within the last six years this country has 
been on the verge of war — referring, in all probability, to 
the Bering Sea difficulty and the strained relations with 
Italy because of the New Orleans massacre. He is no 
alarmist. San Francisco may well be thankful that a be- 
ginning has been made for the proper fortification of this 
port. 



Mothers, be sure and use 
children while teething. 



' Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 



who's 
Kicking ? 




ARE YOU? 



Because we are still 



making this 

CUT-AWAY COAT 
AND VEST 



$12.25 



Of Imported 14-ounce 
Clay Worsted, to your 
order. Also our 



SACK SUITS 
Made of Imported 
Clay Worsteds, Chev- 
iots, Tweeds, etc. 



$13.25 



Pants irom $3 Up. 



TH6 piomoiiMi RoGk 60., 



(Successors to the Plymouth Rock Pants Co.) 

JOS. PINCUS, Agent, S. F., Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1895. 




THERE has been immense excitement because of the 
postponed boat race between Cornell, Columbia, and 
the University of Pennsjlvania, over the Poughkeepsie 
course. On the appointed day over thirty thousand people 
were present, but the unhappy accident which deferred 
the race, viz., the swamping of Pennsylvania's shell by the 
stupid management of Governor Morton's tug skipper, was 
a sad damper upon the enthusiasm of the crowd. Great 
sympathy was felt for Pennsylvania, and she is not now 
considered beaten, for she was too crippled in her mended 
shell to have a chance in the race. Many people who are 
not usually Cornell partisans hoped Cornell would win, be- 
cause Cornell was so plucky in sending a crew to Henley- 
on-Thames, but the blue and white boat walked away from 
the others, and there is, consequently, great glee at 
Columbia. 

Miss Anna Dixon, formerly Superintendent for Napa 
County public schools and now a Stanford University sopho- 
more, is visiting Miss Chittenden at New Rochelle. She 
will go later on to Boston to visit Dr. Winship's family, 
and will also visit Washington for a few weeks. Miss 
Dixon will return to California in August. Hugo Toland 
has signed a contract with Richard Mansfield, and will 
appear with the Hollands, Joe and George, at the Garrick 
Theatre in August. Mrs. Clay Greene spent a few days 
in New York last week, and returned to Bayside after the 
festivities of the "Lambs' Washing" were over. There 
were about ninety of the Lambs at Los Alamos for the 
festivity. Hugo Toland, Joe Holland, and Joe Grismer, 
dressed as cowboys, welcomed the arrivals at the foot of 
the drive and escorted them to the house, where Clay 
Greene — the Shepherd — welcomed them in a graceful 
speech, delivered in Spanish and translated by Mr. Gris- 
mer. Baseball in the water followed, and was attended 
with success and hilarity. A clam-bake was a feature of 
the day, and at night the Lambs, singing all the way home 
their famous " Imp in the Wine," left for New York, and 
did not lose their jovial mood until the early dawn. A most 
amusing feature of the day was the arrival in his launch of 
the Gillig contingent — Mr. Gillig, Frank Unger, and Wil- 
lard Barton. Japanese and Chinese flags trailed in then- 
wake. Mr. Gillig, with a white wig and cocked hat, a red 
beard, a doublet covered with an army coat, and brandish- 
ing a short sword, stood at the bow as the launch steamed 
into the bay, and showed no signs of perturbation at the 
horrid strains of the Barton brass band which announced 
his arrival. It was a great hit. 

I was surprised to hear the other day that Duff May- 
nard is living in New York and has been making a great 
success as an entertainer. I thought I was fairly well 
mi courant of Californians in New York, and yet I had not 
heard of the advent of this clever young man. None the 
less am I more than glad to herald his success. Charley 
Trowbridge, who is well known amongst you as an amateur, 
has had the good fortune to be engaged for a leading part 
in Rob liny next season. His first application for profes- 
sional work was made to its managers, and he has had 
none of the suspense and anxiety usually the fate of 
amateurs who would be professionals. Trowbridge had, 
by the way, a narrow escape from a most unpleasant 
death not long ago. He had just prepared to lie down to 
slumber in a folding bed when that unreliable meuble folded 
itself up. It was not easy to extricate himself, but hap- 
pily he succeeded, and was saved a most gruesome death. 

Mrs. Bella Thomas Nichols is at La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
whither she was summoned by the news of her mother's 
dangerous illness. Mrs. Thomas has, however, rallied and 
is on the high road to recovery. Mrs. Nichols will visit 
Galena and Chicago before her return and will spend 
several weeks with her cousin, Mrs. Michenes, at her 
country place — Lake Winnetonka, near Minneapolis. She 
will also visit Mrs. Carl Jungen at Newport, and Mrs. 
Lake at Yonkers, before returning to New York for the 
winter. Mrs. Jungen will sail late in August for Europe 



and will spend several months visiting her husband's rela- 
tives in Berlin, afterward going to Paris for some lessons 
with Marchesi. All San Francisco society must remember 
her lovely voice. 

Captain John Dillenbeck will leave Fort Hamilton with 
his battery on the morning of July 5th, and will take his 
men to the Berkshire Hills for the summer encampment. 

Mrs. Goodsell, formerly Kate Treat, has been in town 
for a few days from her country place at Greenwich, 
Connecticut. Mr. and Mrs. Gregory McLaughlin are 
once more at Larehmont Manor. Mrs. McLaughlin has 
just returned from a visit to her family at Colegrove, near 
Los Angeles. Miss Caroline Hamilton (nee Milzner) is 
singing at private musicales for the summer and is in 
splendid voice. 
Nw York, June 26, 1895. Passe-Partout. 

THE property owners of this city, by a large majority, 
are in favor of all needed improvements that must be 
made, if at all, at the public cost. But there is no occa- 
sion for making all desired improvements the subject of a 
single tax levy. It certainly appears as though the im- 
provement of Market street, at a cost to the tax-payers 
of $150,000, would be enough for one year, and that the 
proposed boulevarding of Folsom street and certain other 
matters might well await another tax levy. If the Super- 
visors undertake too much at one time there will be dan- 
ger of a revival of silurianism, and of a retrogression to a 
strict construction of the "dollar limit." 

The Survival of the Fittest. 
Furniture moved, stored, packed, and shipped at low rates by Morton 
Special Delivery. Only experienced men employed. Equipment flrst- 
cluss. Offices— 31 Geary street, and 408 Taylor street. 

The Press Clippino Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. F. reads all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies clippings on all topics, business 
and personal. 

Dn. H. W. Hunsaker has removed his offices to 114 Geary street, up 
stairs, near Grant avenue. 



La Bene Creole 



CIGARS 



10c. Straight 

2 for 25c. 

3 for 25c. 



Manufactured by 

S. Hemsheim Bros. & Co., New Orleans, La. 

Rinaldo Bros. & Go., paclflc coast lBKw««, «.. s . ». 



Perrier-Jouet & Co 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 

For sale by all Brst-class Wine 
Merchants and Grocers 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 123 California St 



July 6. 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO M:\vs LETTER. 



A PASTORAL COMEDY. 

BOHEMIA— In the I rden. 

[At the present moment the wits of the Bohemian Club 
i in tlir preparation unedy, to be 

produi '-(I at the annual outing 1 ext month. The suggea- 

nbmitted] 

Time — August 3rd. Scbki An opening in a forest. 
ma— Members of the club. 

KB L — W. Greer Harris.. \ — Ah, gentlemen I Good 
morning! Welcome to the cheerful workers! What a 
day! Bow nature smiles! I have just finished a 
poem to Nature. I t to Henry Irving. 

Gboboi Naoi 1 -Dear old Greer! How are you? 

We have counted the hours until your arrival. Tin- day 
has been hot ami thirsty, but your arrival gives us new 
life and happiness 

Harrv Brady — Yes. it reminds me of my life in Ari- 
zona, years ago, when we would reach a cooling spring 
after a day's ride across the parched and burning desert. 

A 1. GBBBBBDING — But we must hear the poem! (fer- 
vently) Yes! you must read us your poem, Greer. Let 
us hear it before any body else! 

H. X. Clement — By all means! Read us the poem. It 
must surely be an Epic. 

Greer Harrison (blushing with pleasure) — Xo, gentle- 
men: it is a pastoral Threnody. But if I should read it I 
fear I might tire you. Besides, it is in a special tin box 
which I had made for it. and that is down in my tent. I 
should have to send for it. 

GEORGE Nagle — Thank heaven! It is really here! Let 
us recline in yonder leafy bower and send for it! Yonder 
boy will fetch it for us. and. as the day is stifling with 
heat, we can drink iced wine while we listen to the classic 
melody of rhythmic lines ! 

Geebeeding — "What a noble thought. Here in these 
grand old trees to listen like ancient Greeks or Druids to 
divine measures, and at the same time sip the nectar of 
Olympus! 

Harrison — I will consent on one condition — that is, that 
I may order the wine. 

Brady — Oh, Greer, that is too much! 

Xagle — How magnificently generous! 

Gerberding — You are piling Ossa on 
munificence! 

[Harrison at once orders the champagne, 
poem.] 

Scene II. — The same place, with Harrison in the 
middle of his poem. 

Harrison (raiding) — 

" And Ireland's woes «re Ireland's wrongs. 
Their memory through Ireland throngs." 

Brady — How perfect! What genius! What fervid elo- 
quence! As grand as Victor Hugo. 

Clement — Grander! 

Nagle — Stupendous! And here comes Henry Heyman! 
He must hear it — dear old Henry! So glad to welcome 
you! 

[The entire party embraces Heyman ecstatically.] 

Brady — Henry, "where — oh where — is your Stradi varius ? 
We must have it at once! Greer is reading us a wonder- 
ful poem, and we want low, soft music to accompany it. It 
exhales melody in every line, but think — oh, think, Henry — 
how it will enthrall us under the magic spell 
of your marvelous genius ! 

Gerberding — Yes, oh yes, Henry; have the 
servant fetch your fiddle ! We are sitting here 
in this cool and shady bower and listening to 
the heroic cadences of Greer's noble creation, 
while at times we have enjoyed the contents 
of a large iced bottle. 

Nagle — Yes, Henry, send for the violin! 
And have some of the cool wine ! 

Heyman (gratified and smiling) — All right! 
I will play you the music. Boy, fetch me my 
fiddle from my tent, but before you go let me 
have a glass of wine. I am dying with thirst! 

Servant (apologetically) — Very sorry sir, 
but the wine is all gone. 

Chorus of the four cheerful workers — 
Oh, what a shame — and you're so thirsty, too! 



Pelion in your 
and also his 



N loli (with / • there iamore on ice 

('« '*• ""•'"'■ ■■ a b •>. tx low, i.- then not? 

1 bope they have not neglected the 

MrvM w Yes, boy, when vou bring up my fiddle be sure 
not to forget a cold bottle of wtnel 

Snt\ \nt — A quart or .1 pint, sir? 

Bram (ah th , mind thrust* "W tit, fi 

quart bottle) — Here, boy, her.' is ti„. empty bottle we have 
just finished. Take it back to the liar when you go, 

Heyman (eyeing //,. .;-.. .,/' the bottle) — Yes, boy, vou may 
bring a quart. 

[Sighs of relief on all sides.] 

Scene HI.— [Harrison still reads and Heyman saws 
away cm 7V,. Carnival of Venia with variations. The wine 
arrives and is eagerly consumed. Enter Horace Piatt, 
and is grabbed by all hands.] 

Brady — Welcome to our sylvannook, great Horace, and 
recline on the mossy while you listen to Greer's greatest 
effort of his life read to the dulcet tones of Henry's 
Cremona! 

Nagle— Ay, and afterward regale our eager cars with 
the magic of your own unsurpassed wit and eloquence! 

All (with 1 ntlimiasm) — Yes, Horace, seat yourself here in 
the center, and we may none of us lose a syllable of your 
own ! 

[Overcome with a suffocation of exquisite delight, Piatt 
sinks upon the sward.] 

Clement (artfully)— But you are flushed with the hot sun 
and burning without. Horace! 

Gerberding— Yes, Horace, and you look athirst. Your 
lips are parched! 

Platt (fanning himself vriih his hut) — Yes, it was very 
warm walking up, but I'll cool off presently. 

Nagle — But would not some cooling drink be grateful to 
your dry and heated throat? 

Platt — Why, yes, I believe that would be a good idea 
Waiter, go down to the bar and bring up half a dozen 
bottles of that cold beer I had just a while ago. 

[An awful gloom falls over the crowd, while Brady and 
Nagle exchange glances of piteous disappointment and 
gaze regretfully at the two empty wine bottles as Harri- 
son and Heyman continue their Threnodic exhibition.] 

Scene IV. — [Barbour Lathrop is seen approaching.] 

Nagle (with a joyous gleam of hope in his eye) — Ah, gentle- 
men, rejoice! Here comes the illustrious Barbour; a more 
noble Bohemian never lived. He has come into a fortune, 
and is the prince of hosts ! 

Brady — Yes, on his return the other dav I enjoyed a 
superb glass of wine with him. It was Brut Imperial, and 
delicious! 

Gerberding — And I drank it with him also. 

Clement — And I, too. (As Barbour Lathrop enters) Ah, 
Barbour, dear old boy, welcome to our joyous midst. I 
enjoyed that glass of wine with you so much last night, old 
fellow. It was so cool and refreshing in this stifling 
weather! 

Barbour (wiping his heated Irow) — Yes, it is; and I'm 
thirsty myself now. Here, waiter, go down to camp and 
fetch us all a big can of iced milk, with enough glasses to 
go around among these gentlemen. Milk quenches the 
thirst! 

[Everybody faints. Nagle and Brady expire.] 

Henry Bigelow. 



iSOAP 

IPOWDER 




Wanting Borax In De*tttVa((gy C«t. 



A 2 ti MULE HELP ™ KITCHEN m LAUNDRY. 

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FOR 
WCIfIC COAST BORAX CC. S.rRAnClSCO-CfllCAGO-lltW'YOWt. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1895. 




$\Sd$S HWD 



"We Obey No Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

WE found that Tlu Senator was one of the brightest 
pieces of American comedy ever presented in this 
country when Mr. Crane and his admirable body of fellow- 
players brought it to the Bush-street Theatre some years 
ago. We also discovered, after packing the theatre nightly 
and paying every tribute that could be offered to the play 
and its actors, that Mr. Crane was saying very nasty 
things about us and establishing a disagreeable precedent 
for all the Corbetts, Kendals, and Walshes, who had, or 
imagined they had. a grievance against San Francisco. 
And all because Mr. Crane brought an almost perfect 
organization with him — a company so excellent (and good 
companies were not so rare here in those days) that we 
saw no single star, but a goodly section of the Thespian 
heavens, as brilliant around the edges as in the center. 
Mr. Frawley was one of those luminous bodies. Like the 
, man who once arose at 4 A. M. (for reasons best known to 
himself) and was discovered by his neighbors and ever 
afterwards considered a model of old-fashioned industry, 
this is where Mr. Frawley made his reputation. As Mr. 
George Schuyler, U. S. A., Mr. Frawley has a part that 
fits him, and that is the only kind of a part he can play. 
We have seen Mr. Frawley many tunes endeavor to act a 
rt'ih foreign to that peculiar personality of his, and the 
result was invariably unpleasant. As the Lieutenant, he 
is awkward, inflexible, dry, and unemotionally voiced, at 
tunes as rigid as an unstrung marionette, but withal, 
manly, and this makes of the character even more than its 
authors intended. It is doubtful if there is another actor 
on the English speaking stage who can do what Mr. Fraw- 
ley has done with Lieutenant Schuyler. 

* * * 

Mr. Arbuckle gives a Crane rendering of Senator Rivers 
that is evident from the first sight of the "little bunch" 
on his chin to the final business of the closing scene. The 
part demands a continuous strain of nervous energy that 
Mr. Arbuckle does not come by naturally ; but as a piece 
of conscientious, studious acting, it is meritable. Miss 
Bates is charming as the superbly gowned and susceptible 
Mrs. Hilary, but she is cultivating an over-abundance of 
facial expression that mars the sincerity of her acting. 
Mr. Wyngate seems led about the stage by a large voice 
of grating timbre, and succeeds in making Count von 
Strahl quite detestable. Miss Grey does more than make 
Mabel Denman a beautiful girl — she invests her with the 
subdued dignity and manners of a gentlewoman. George 
Osbourne has not a part equal to his talent as Secretary 
Armstrong, but all that a thorough actor can do with the 
lines he does. Mr. Blakemore's Celestial, Ling Ching, is 
somewhat of an exotic, to us ; nevertheless, the character 
is well drawn. Miss Kelleher's debut seems a bit prema- 
ture. She has an uncultured pronounciation and a bad 
presence. Taken altogether, the Frawley Company gives 
a very good production of an excellent comedy. 

* * * 

That snappy bit of nonsense, Tar and Tartar, was given 
a jolly revival at the Tivoli on Monday evening. The piece 
has in no way suffered from the rest it has had since its 
last long run at the same house, and is considerably 
brightened up with new songs, and jokes, that are funny, 
even if a little world-worn. However, Harry B. Smith's 
libretto has enough amusing lines in it to have made us 
laugh again without the aid of the new batch of gags. 
The male characters are in about the same bands that 
gave the former production, with the exception of W. H. 
West, who is cast as Pajama, and does quite well. Raffael 
has his old part of Cardamon and carries it in a most 
praiseworthy manner. His singing of " The Bedouin 
Love Song," one of the many interpolations, is the best 
thing in the performance. Miss Millard looks very pretty 
and sings well as Farina. Miss Royce's Alpaca is a most 
gorgeous fabric, instead of the plain "old black" the 
author intended her to be. How women, particularly 
comic opera women, will struggle against a homely make- 
up; even when its absence mars the consistency of the 



lines. Miss Fitch had a small opportunity as Lambrequin 
and made the most of it. Hartman is of course Muley 
Hassen and indulges in a great deal of the agressively 
hilarious business that one does not blame him so much for 
as one blames the Tivoli patrons for encouraging with 
round after round of applause. If Hartman acts for his 
audiences, it is not nattering to them; if it is his own esti- 
mate of comedy, he has reached his zenith. And it is not 
a very lofty one. 

* * * 

The Shaw Comedy Company are drawing good houses at 
the Oakland Theatre this week in Farmer Stebbins, a play 
which is always a good attraction. It is full of inimitable 
caricatures and laughable features, and one never regrets 
attending even at high prices; but at 10c, 20c. and 30c, 
which are charged, it is no wonder the houses are packed. 
The entire combination is composed of excellent talent, 
working harmoniously together. Next Monday evening, 
and for the balance of the week", Fogg's Ferry will be 
played. Mr. Albert Lando, an old-time favorite, will be in 
the east, and Mr. Frank Armstrong will play the juvenile 
lead, Mr. Shaw appearing in the star part. 

* * * . 

Tlir Old Homestead continues to crowd the California 
nightly with its quaint old picture of New England farm 
life and everyone seems to leave the theatre happily dis- 
posed toward this simple, homely play that has almost at- 
tained the dignity of being an American classic. Tin Old 
Homestead has journeyed the theatres of this country for 
nine years and still seems to have a strong enough hold 
upon the hearts of American theatre-goers to last many 
more seasons. Next week will be its last at the California; 
after which it gives way to Hoyt's roaring farce, Tin 

Blmk Sheep. 

* * * 

San Franciscans have almost forgotten what a really 
high class company of players look like and the fashion and 
excitement of a swell first night is all but a memory. The 
Lyceum Company will inaugurate the fourteenth season of 
the Baldwin Theatre on Monday evening, July 15th, with a 
production of Henry Arthur Jones' highly praised comedy, 
The < 'ase <</' Rebellious Susan. It will give a new and much 
needed activity to theatrical interests here, aud the open- 
ing event promises to be of artistic and social importance. 
The other plays to be presented by the company are; 
Tm Amazons, An Ideal Husband, and The Wife. The en- 
gagement is limited to three weeks. 

* * * 

Tar and Tartar has caught on so well at the Tivoli 
that it will be continued until further notice. The next 
production will be Balfe's Satanella. 

G| 1 ' T*L ± The "Gem " Theatre of the Coast. 

OlUmDia I heatre- Friedlander. Gottlob&Co., Lessees 
aud Managers. 
Second and last week. The perfection of all remarkable com- 
edies. Commencing Monday, Julv 8th; every evening, Isoluding 
Sunday; matinee Saturday; The FBAWLEY COMPANY, pre- 
senting the greatest American comedy, illustrating social, 
political, and diplomatic life in Washington. D. C , entitled 

THE SENATOR. 

Monday July I5th , Special and import aut engagement of MISS 
HELEN DAUVREY, in the first production in San Francisco of 

ONE OF OUR GIRLS. 
Souvenirs presented to every lady attending the opening night's 
performance. 

Our popular prices— Night, 15c, 35c, 50c. 75c Saturday mati- 
nee. 15c, 25c, 50c 

GI'JT ' n"\ i Al. Hayman & Co.. (Incorporated) 

alitornia I heatre- proprietors. 

Every evening, including Sunday. Monday next, July 8th. third 
and last week of Denman Thompson's play, 

THE OLD HOMESTEAD. 

Management of E. A. McFarlaud. 

Last performance Sunday, July 14th. 

Coming, Monday, July 15th, Hoyt's '■ A Black Sheep." 

Ti . m A i_i Mrs. Ernestine Kreling. 

I VOl I Upera llOUSe. Proprietor and Manager 

Every evening. The success of successes. The glorious Ameri- 
can comic opera, 

TAR AND TARTAR. 

A perfect production in every detail. 
Next opera— SATANELLA. 
Popular Prices ;J5c and 50c 



July ' 



SAX FRANCISCO KEWS I.I I 



LOCAL APHORISMS. 

ofpreynei '•/ 

" Equal ■ 
•• u you want your Friend to avoid you lend him money." 

— H H 

a 1 men leave their faults ; Uul men excuse them." — 

Dr. '■ 

"A robin in tbt etter than an eagle in thecal 

• Anthony. 

i-t by little men." — 
/." .'/ Greentcay. 

"For the lucky man even the rooster will lay eggs 

ll'thlirit,. 

•■Well, what does it matter; me dead, the world dead." 

— Path* r Audiffred. 

" You can turn a .-tone into bread if you only work hard 
enough. "— I'm Rtddy. 

"Drunkenness is an egg from which the vices are 
hatched. 1 ' — Or. Win. Mart 

" It is useless to be afraid of the future or to weep for 
the past.'' — James Barry. 

"It is not the hen that cackles most that lays the most 
— li' <-. Anna Shaw. 

"Every man is now and again what he ought to be all 
the time. ' — W. F. Herrin. 

" This city owes me a living — providing I earn it." — 
./. M. Block, Tax-Colleclor. 

" If size were all that was required the cow could outrun 
the hare." — Captain Morse. 

"The claw of a bear was once as dangerous as the quill 
of a goose." — Ambrose Bierce. 

'■'A woman is very secretive — when she has nothing to 
tell."— Mrs. F. L. W. Walker. 

" Xo man's character can be essentially injured except 
by his own acts." — Dr. Marc Levingston. 

"Sympathy! Yes, yes, s.ympathy is all very good, but 
after all did you ever see one man limp because another 
was hurt." — Abner Doble. 

"As we grow older the defects of the mind become more 
pronounced, just like the defects of the face." — "Mind 
Reader" Tyndall 

THE DISPOSAL OF GARBAGE. 



IN a few weeks the city authorities will decide what is to 
be done with the garbage. Shall it be cremated or used 
for the purpose of making land ? Both methods have been 
adopted in other places and both may have something in 
their favor. As far as health goes, the cremation of gar- 
bage is the best. Scientists know that refuse supplies 
pabulum and the germs of disease, and that ground made 
out of refuse is a hot-bed for the graveyard. The pubes- 
cible decaying substances live through the ages beneath 
our feet, and we know the result. What San Francisco 
wants is the destruction of its refuse by furnaces, and, per- 
haps in some cases, the making of new land under condi- 
tions which would destroy the germs of disease. New York 
saves one-third what it cost under the old system, by cre- 
mating its garbage, as far as tried. In Savannah, Georgia, 
4'3,000 tons of garbage were cremated at an average cost 
of fifteen cents per cubic yard. In Lowell, Massachusetts, 
good results have, too, been obtained. Chicago spends 
$75,000 a year destroying its garbage, and it is increasing 
its facilities in this direction every day. And we know 
that the ashes produced by cremating this garbage nearly 
pays for the fuel, and the more the question is considered 
the more we know that if we are to keep up "with the 
procession in sanitary affairs, the less delay we have in 
bringing about this necessary improvement the better for 
the health of the city. 

The El Campo pleasure resort is now the popular place for recrea- 
tion for the people of San Francisco. Every Sunday crowds of peo- 
ple assemble there to engage in the healthful and invigorating exer- 
cises that are offered by the management. Music and dancing, fish- 
ing, bowling, and other amusements engage the attention of visitors, 
and being near the city it requires but a few minutes to reach the 
grounds. The steamer Ukiah makes regular trips to and from the 
grounds every Sunday. 




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I A 2oz.Trial PacKage I 

.Post Paid for25G s i 



I THE AMiRON TOBKXO CO. Succi 
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Because 



They arc stored two years before bottling' 
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mat's why 



Evans' India Pale Ale and Brown Stout 
are to-day the finest brewings in the market. 

In Bottles or Direct from the Wood. 

C. H. Evans & Sons, Brewers, Hudson, New York. 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, 

Pacific Coast Agents, San Francisco, Portland, Los Angeles 

EL OAMPO, 

THE POPULAR BAY RESORT, now open every Sunday dur- 
ing the season. Music, Dancing, Bowliug, Boating, Fishing, 
and other amnsements. Refreshments at city prices. 
Fare, round trip, 25c: children. 15c, including admission to 
grounds. 

The steamer TJKIAH will leave Tiburon Ferry 10:30 A. m., 12:10 
2:00, and 4:00 p.m. Returning, leave El Campo 11:15 A. m., I, 3, 
and 5 P. M. 

Rankin, Thomas Zi Go., 

THEATRICAL BUREAU AND AGENTS, 
916 MARKET ST., Columbian Building, Room 46. 
Professional talent for private entertainments furnished at 
short notice. Entire charge taken of same. Plays, sketches, 
etc., for sale or rent. Wanted, at all times, dramatic and 
vaudeville artists. Agents for C. D. Hess, Grease Paints 
and general stage make up. 

I II I I AM DCnRARH Tue English actress, coaches ladies and gentle- 
L1LLIMIM DLUUnnUi men for the dramatic professton; appearances ar- 
ranged. Shakespearean classes Wednesday evenings. SHAKESPEAR- 
EAN ACADEMY, 406 Van Ness avenue. San Francisco, Cal. 

ASK YOUR GROCER FOR 



U^HCAKEMEAL *C 

CAMPERS 



30-32 California St., S. F. 



FRANK B. PETERSON & CO, Agents, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1895. 




T* 7 J - ~ ' ' ' 1 •! ^1 T . 1 ,V^" <-- 



DENIS Donohoe, son of the British Consul, went a fish- 
ing one day last week. Mr. Donohoe's rig was simply 
perfection. His rod was a split bamboo of the latest make, 
and his creel would hold twenty-five pounds of fish. In his 
book was every fly that had ever floated over lake or 
stream. Now Mr. Donohoe had a pass for the Lagunitas 
Lake. But in getting the pass he neglected to ask just 
where the lake was. He had heard it was somewhere in 
the mountains of Marin, and this was enough for him. The 
result was that Mr. Donohoe, starting from Sausalito, 
steered straight for the ocean. The result was that he 
brought up at Gioli's ranch, a mile or so from the Point 
Bonita lighthouse. Here Mr. Gioli had backed up the 
water from the creek and made a pond, which, with much 
labor, he stocked. Mr. Donohoe at once concluded that he 
had struck Lake Lagunitas, put his rod together, and cast 
his flies over the pond. The trout rose freely, and in an 
hour or so Mr. Donohoe had virtually cleaned out the pond. 

Then he dropped into Gioli's dairy and asked for a glass 
of milk. 

"You have some nice trout there," said Gioli, "where 
did you get them?" 

"Oh, I caught them in Lake Lagunitas." said Mr. Dono- 
hoe, proudly, "that sheet of water just around the 
corner." 

Gioli is a good natured man, but he swore some honest 
Swiss-Italian oaths, and sincerely hoped that Mr. Dono- 
hoe's milk would disagree with him. 

* * * 

The Athenian Club has a round table at which the Athe- 
nians sit and say their prayers. On feast days a large 
punch bowl, which will hold about six gallons of punch as 
strong as any ever brewed, is mounted on a tripod in the 
center of the table. At the bottom of the bowl, extending 
around its circumference, are a number of holes equal to 
the number of the Knights of the Round Table. One end 
of a rubber tube, about six feet long, is fastened to each 
hole. The other end of the tube is usually fast in the mouth 
of an Athenian, as he lies back in his big easy chair and 
sucks inspiration from the fount. The outer ends of the 
tubes have cut-off attachments, so that the clubman may 
dam the flow of punch every few minutes as he whiffs at 
his pipe or arises to make a speech, sing a song, or tell a 
funny story. The bowl is about a foot above the table, so 
that the liquor flows down the tube to its natural resting 
place just as easily as a brook rolls down the mountain 
side. The Athenians are great men, and now that the 
facts about their patent punch bowl are known honors and 
visitors may be thrust upon them. There may also be a 
sudden increase in the price of rubber tubing suitable for 
round-tables. 

* * * 

Fritz Hinckley, the happy husband of Florence Blythe 
that was, is said to be having a high old time at the races. 
He is known by the touts as "Our Fritz." One youth who 
is presumed to know every selling plater on the track, and 
who can see a dog as far away as a poundman, exhibited 
a very handsome gold watch the other day, which he said 
had been presented to him by "our Fritz" as a slight 
token of regard and esteem, the boy said that Hinckley 
had given him his choice of $300 in cash or the watch. 
Another "sure thing" indicator flourished a magnificent 
diamond ring, which he said had been presented to him by 
"our Fritz." Young Hinckley is evidently enjoying life 
like a thoroughbred. 

* * * 

The fishing at the Country Club has been exceedingly 
good this year, and some splendid strings have been 
caught. Johnny Orr, however, has the advantage over 
every one. At the side of his pretty cottage flows a well- 
stocked brook, and every morning he seats himself in a 
long rustic chair on his broad veranda, and there, with 
rod hi hand, leisurely whips the deep pool below. When 
he has caught enough trout for breakfast he hands them 
over to the cook. And they are good I 



The ways and means which have arisen lately to entice 
the Reverend Charles Miel back into the pulpit of St. 
Peter's Church recalls the scene to mind in which he was 
once an actor of no- little ability in that sacred edifice. 
During the singing the congregation was much disturbed 
by one of their number. The location of the church is not 
in an aristocratic quarter, so the congregation was 
drawn from some of the toughest corners of Barbary Coast 
goes without saying. The brilliant eloquence for which 
Mr. Miel is noted could not be resisted even by those crea- 
tures. During the singing of the hymn ' ' Jesus, Lover of 
My Soul" this dreadful Coaster " was heard again sing- 
ing "We Won't Go Home Until Morning," etc., much to 
the amusement of the numerous small boys and feather- 
brained adults. The Reverend's amiability came to an end, 
so, with gentle reverence he adjusted his surplice, then 
walked quietly, quickly down the aisle, grabbed the misera- 
ble offender by the seat of the trousers and the back of the 
neck, and threw him out the door. A man of such elo- 
quence and determination is always sought for. Hence 

the call. 

* * * 

There was a ridiculous statement in the papers the other 
day to the effect that the Countrv Club had driven off all 
the deer from their magnificent range in Bear Valley, and 
that these same deer had betaken themselves to the Bur- 
dell Ranch, which the new Country Club has just leased. 
The actual facts are that there were never so many deer 
in Bear Valley for, probably, thirty years as there are 
this season. Fred Webster, in a careful estimate, says 
that there are now over five thousand does roaming their 
splendid domain. The bucks come down from Mendocino 
County in droves every season, and return to the north 
again about January or February. The does crowd about 
the club house vicinity so thickly during these warm sum- 
mer nights that chained watch dogs have to be placed at 
intervals around the orchard and gardens to save the trees 
and plants from being devoured. The kennels there are 
very extensive now, one member alone lodging there forty 
dogs. A feature of the Country Club hunt is the hunting 
horns, which are used, as in France, to announce that a 
deer has broken cover. 

* * * 

Those two veteran artists, Joseph Harrington and 
Charles Robinson, have taken an ark over at Belvedere, 
where they paint all manner of landscapes and enliven the 
inhabitants with their wit and music. They are welcome 
guests at the various dinners and picnics, and are passed 
around the circle seven nights a week. Saturday night 
a week ago Harrington kept Mrs. Harry Sherwood's 
guests in a continual state of mirth with his funny Irish 
and Italian stories. 

* * * 

It is more than probable that the champion lawn tennis 
matches will be contested at Monterey next year. The 
scheme is very popular with the more prominent members. 
Of course the present grounds at Del Monte are inade- 
quate to the demands of a "big" match, but it has been 
intimated that a superb tennis court with grand stand will 
be readily prepared should the various tennis clubs of the 
Coast decide to change from San Rafael to Monterey. 

* * * 

Mr. Alex C. Williamson's "paw" has been made a 
baronet by Lord Roseberry. Alex C. is a clerk at Balfour 
Guthrie's, and a good, decent lad. Now he is the recip- 
ient of so much adulation that he feels, even in this repub- 
lic, it is something to be the son of a newly-created baronet. 
He may blot his ledger, or spit on the wrong side of his 
cuspidor, but no one casts a stone at him. And so the 
merry world goes on. 

* * * 

It is said the cause of the removal of Professor Davidson 
is for the purpose of placing in order of promotion one who 
stands next in line below Captain Rodgers, and who also 
enjoys being the son of an authority in Washington. To 
guard one's family is well enough, provided it in no way 
conflicts with the State's interest; when it does, means 
should be taken to see justice done. 

The importations during 1894 of G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Extra Dry Cham- 
pagne aggregate 80,778 cases, or 44,764 cases more than any other brand. 
its l!.s'.i vintage attracts great attention for remarkable quality, natural 
dryness, and purity. 



July 6, 1895. 



SAN PRANCISCO NEWS LBTTBR. 



There L- }>r. >'!■.. to In the journ i who 

has a keener perception of the advantage.- to be derived 
from u complete and relia than Choi 

Short ridge, editor and proprietor i>f the San Franciaoo 
■'/. In his ambition to grasp every department 
of tl service of the world, be lately formed an 

alliance with the Ui! elation of New York, 

which b the successor of the original Associated Press, by 
which he is enabled to furnish the readers of the ''.1//. as 

is of the San Jose l/i y, of which he is also pro- 
prietor, with the extensive and complete news service of 
this powerful organization. The (Tinted Press Association 
was formed by the New York Sun, Herald, Tribune, Time*, 

1, and Journal of ' together with all the 

leading newspapers cif New England, the South and West, 
in order to secure a more perfect system of gathering the 
news, and it became so powerful and so much more perfect 
than other organizations that it absorbed them all. includ- 
ing tl ted Press Association. The Cull has now 
at its service all the vast news of this association, whose 
arms reach to every point of the civilized world. In this 
enterprise Mr. Shoftridge is prepared to furnish the 
readers of the ( 'aU with every item of news worth reading, 
and has added an interest to the columns of his journals 
that has been appreciated by the people everywhere. It 
i- as much of a service to the interior press as to those 
who look for news in the columns of the metropolitan 
dailies, being both fresh and reliable. In this exhibition of 
enterprise Mr. Shortridge has only manifested a natural 
ambition to be in the front rank of journalism, and by this 
stroke of policy in business he reaches every locality in the 
United States where members of the association may be 
found. The readers of the Call, which is now one of the 
greatest newspapers in the United States, can be satisfied 
of the fact that they have a mirror that reflects the events 
of the world in this great arm of news gleaning, which has 
no equal and no rival. 

* # * 

In his happier moods the Reverend Father King, the 
pioneer priest of Oakland, tells an incident which befell him 
some thirty years ago, when he had not long been out here. 
His parish extended sixty miles, nearly to San Jose, so he 
often had to make some very long trips on horseback. 
Strong and young, and always neatly dressed, he soon was 
a well-known figure for miles around. On one occasion, 
while on a journey up to the mountains, he saw a pretty 
little white and black animal running in the road before 
him. To dismount and try to catch it was the work of an 
instant, and in another minute he had made the closest ac- 
quaintance possible with the habits of the California skunk. 
He reached his destination, but nobody could sit in the 
room with him, and at last he consented to allow his clothes 
to be buried in the garden, while a good-natured 
parishioner gave him his Sunday best. Even this was of 
no avail, for the first old lady who came to recount her 
frailties had not begun to smite her breast before, with a 
loud whoop, she yelled "skunk!" and made for the door. 
It was no use to try and hold services, for the little ani- 
mal's baptism had been complete, so, with a nauseated 
look, the Reverend gentleman re-mounted his steed, and, 
clad in a farmer's clothes three sizes too large for him, 
galloped back to Oakland. His appearance can be better 
imagined than described, and it tallied with his feelings. 
Father King has never meddled with another skunk to 
this day, and thinks it may have possibly been the foul 
fiend himself who, in those long gone days, metamaphosed 
himself with the object of ruining the young priest's soul 
by inducing him to swear like a Billingsgate fish-lady. 



There are more than three hundred American artists 
now in Paris. So at least we are told by a writer in the 
Magazine of Arts. Evidently an art critic himself, the 
writer honorably mentions John Sargent, Whistler, and 
John W. Alexander. He praises Walter Gay, Henry 
Mosler, Edwin L. Weeks, F. A. Bredgman, Alexander 
Harrison, Ridgeway Knight, Elizabeth Gardner and H. S. 
Bisling. Miss Klumpke, a native of San Francisco, 
who has been living a long time in Paris, where she is well 
known among the American French painters, has two pic- 
tures in this year's Salon. 



The quality of hut. trained in the Portia 

Club- • ^ 

Pitch the pyrotechnical, to his looking-glass: "Are my 
ears on straight 
Wealthy women are given to extravagance in dress, but 

Mrs. Stanford's fifteen million-dollar suit eclipses them all. 

_ No bank robberies were reported to the police on the 

Fourth, yet the town was alive with safe orackers. 

Bona fide trousers can always i>e cul down to fit papa's 

DOjr, but mama's bloomers can never be made over into 
pants. 

Lady Douglas is evidently in touch with up-to-date ide 
She is training Lord Sholto in the manly art of dish-wiping. 
Even royally cannol evade the New Woman. 

Don't fail to chew Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum after 
meals. Indigestion fades before it. 

All our new frame? have ornamented corners. Old patterns at 2."> 
per cent, discount. Same rule applies to Framed Pictures. San- 
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Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 311 Sansome St. .... San Francisco, Cal. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

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SIMPSON, MACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

FUERST BROS. & CO 3 and 4 Stone St., New York 



NEW YORK. 



LONDON. 



The HARASZTHY 



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ARPAD HARASZTHY, 

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CHICAGO. 



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Coast. 



Goodyear Rubber Company, 

R. H. Pease, Vice-President and Manager. 
577-579 Market St., S. F. 73-75 First St., Portland, Or 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1895. 




AMONG all the girls at the tennis tournament on the 
Fourth, none was more admired than Miss Alice Ames, 
whose fair fresh beauty made a decided impression. The 
Misses Bee and Ethel Hooper were surrounded by beaux, 
but the former was too intent upon the game to give a 
thought to the men, evidently. The Misses Kip, in their 
dainty summer gowns, looked charming; Miss Ethel Tomp- 
kins also was an attractive figure. A sweet-faced young 
maiden was Lloyd Tevis's grand-daughter, Miss Florence 
Breckenridge. whose handsome mother, Mrs. Fred Sharon, 
wore a particularly effective costume. Miss Susie Bland- 
ing is another bud about to blossom into maidenhood ; one 
may safely say the stock of pretty belles for the future is 
a large one. The Goad sisters have been greatly admired, 
each in her different way. The beaux are looking forward 
to the arrival of pretty Miss Alice Boggs, whose gentle, 
refined grace has won scores of admirers. 

* * * 

The Belvederians have decided to hold their Venetian 
fiesta during the first part of next month instead of next 
week, as was originally intended. Colonel Shatter has won 
the hearts of all by promising that the band of the First 
Infantry, although it will be encamped at Monterey with 
the regiment at that time, can proceed to the land of lan- 
terns and the sea of launches, gondolas, yachts, and skiffs. 
The charming Tucker girls have already selected their 
guests for a house party, as has also the Arthur Pages. 
Invitations for that evening are in great demand. 

* * * 

Ross Valley hails with delight the return of Mrs. Harry 
Allen, after a prolonged absence from her lovely home. 
Her kinfolks, consisting of the Coffins, Wyatts, Newhalls, 
and Kittles, will each in turn give her luncheons and din- 
ners galore. As Miss Fannie Wyatt, when the Reverend 
Mr. Wyatt officiated at the old Trinity Church, she held 
the throne of belleship and beauty against all. Even now, 
with a daughter on the verge of making her d£but, Mrs. 
Allen is possessed of more youthful and chic appearance 
than many of last winter's belles. 

* * * 

Bel Monte leads in the race for Fashion's favor, the 
guests for the Fourth embracing a large number of our 
exclusive set. The Moores were among the earliest to 
arrive, but the full swing of festivities at this queenly re- 
sort will be when General Forsythe and his gallant soldier 
boys are in camp near by. Already the note of prepara- 
tion is heard in the air, and maids and matrons alike are 
not only timing their Del Monte visit so as to be there at 
that time, but are all saving their prettiest gowns for the 
approval of the sons of Mars. 

* * * 

At no resort of our swim is there such a bouquet of 
•attractive young matrons as at Burlingame. Take, for 
instance, Mrs. Joe Tobin, Mrs. Page Brown, Mrs. Henry 
Scott, Mrs. Richard Sprague, Mrs. Will Crocker, and Mrs. 
Oothout. Where in the country can a greater galaxy of 
bright, pretty women be found V No wonder the men vote 
B'lingham the place of all others. Major Rathbone is a 
host in himself, and being untrammeled by business cares 
has plenty (if spare time to devote to entertaining his 
friends down there. 

* * * 

If but one-half that one hears is true, what a place for 
naughty goings-on is our sister city across the bay. Talk 
of San Francisco society being in a bad way ! It isn't in 
it with Oakland, according to gossip. Every day one 
hears a fresh tale of recklessness, to put it mildly, on the 
part of some girl of respectable surroundings, and of dis- 
graceful actions on the part of some man. 

* # * 

The hurried departure of Lady Hesketh was a source of 
genuine regret to her large circle of friends, who had little 
opportunity, during her brief stay in the city, of offering 
her hospitality. They all hope she will return again soon 
and make a longer visit in her old home. 



Some are wondering what attraction exists between the 
pretty violin virtuoso and the dentist's wife. Some say 
music, but others who know the ambitious matron say 
social position, and for this purpose cleverly surrounds 
herself with a few sweet amiables as stepping stones. The 
soft way in which she was wont to say "we Southerners" 
was amusing until after it was learned that, before this, 
ambitious Yankees who slid across the border-land for 
half a day's holiday were known to call themselves South- 
erners. The true, genuine article looked on, smiled, then 
passed by the pretenders. Hence the silenced tongue 
and the ambitious entertainments. 

* * * 

Will the rumor be verified after the summer of the en- 
gagement between Mr. Newhall and the Titian belle on the 
Avenue ? People have busied their brains for so long it 
would be charity if the interested parties would only make 
known their intentions to their friends. In the meantime 
gossip waxes warm on the subject. 

* * # 

" Love on Crutches " may be applicable to the case of 
the Richelieu belle and the middle-aged, dark attorney, 
who is a constant devotee since the bicycle accident. They 
would make a handsome couple, and she would give room 

for another long-time belle. 

* # * 

The possibility that pretty Mrs. Sherwood may be a 
bride again seems to get stronger as the summer advances. 
This beautiful young charmer is brave indeed if she at- 
tempts again that which proved such a dismal failure, 
though no fault of her's. 



After dinner try Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewuig Gum. 
will find it admirable. 



Yon 




Fine Clarets. 



ft. de LUZE, & FILS., 

Bordeaux, France. 



St. Estephe 
Brown Cantenac 
Pauillac 
St. Julien 
Pontet Canet 
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if Paveil 
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Fine Sauternes 

Sauternes Sup'r 
Maut Sauternes 
Chat Yquem, '83 
In cases, quarts and pints. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 



Sole Agents. 



314 Sacramento street, S. F. 



1849 Jackson St 



Van Ness Young 
Ladies Seminary 



San Francisco 



Under the ownership and direction of S. H. WILLEY, aided by a corps of 
twelve teachers. Numbers in the family limited to twenty-five. 



Next Term Opens August 1st. 



THe Banjo. 

flshton P. Stevens. 

STUDIO: 26 Montgomery street, 
Room 8. Pupils prepared for Stage, 
Concert, or Drawing Room. A Special 
Class for 
teachers who wish to perfect themselves in the Banjo's harmony and technic 



Miss Sanson's School, 



Boarding and Day School for Young 
Ladies and Children. 1625 San Jose 
avenue, between Grand and Paru Sts. 



Alameda, Gal. 



July f 



SAX FRANCISCO NI.WS LETTER. 



'3 



UNTOLD DEEDS. 

Till ■ malignant tra 

- from our foremost Italian join 

TobGbakd Heart of that Mayob.— How that Mayor 
ways been t-> have the Grand Heart. Next 
'■> this writing everj 

■ rtisement. It im much d 

he never have do care. He is paying for all things. He 
He wish if he <-.m sell that beauti- 
ful railroad with the electric ' That is of the splendid con- 
m! It has in it the money for all the people I It 
be all the honest man ' t in v. Sutro he has not been 
liking the damn Irish. That was his little gentle nature ! 
He has been saying howthat damn Irish not shall subscribe, 
race, that Mayor Sutro ! 

That Bad Hkaht. — It has been the Signor Fredrigo 
Webster who has have the bail heart. This has been tell- 
ing us yesterday night by that friend the Grayson. The 
r Webster he has meeting the Signor Clinton Worden 
on the parade Montgomery avenue, and he tells bow they 
shall walk down the street Pacific. When the Signor Wor- 
den has heen to ;_'et mad ! And he has told Signor Web- 
Bter about it is to be disgrace to walk on the Pacific street 
because he is of the noble blood. And he say how it have 
been being insult. Then that Signor Webster he has been 
having the bad heart, and he say nothing. Then he leave 
that Signor Worden and he has always been smiling all the 
time. After he go by himself, all alone, to that Signor 
Arturo Price, and he tell him how he would like the poison. 
And Arturo Price he has given him the bad poison. When 
Signor Worden reading all this, he is shall go and tell Chief 
Crowley. 

Il TraditoI — How that gentle nature, that Signor 
Johnny Fouga ! How is was being all the time betray by 
his bad friend last week. He hire always the fine large 
Tom-cat that can sing every night. He has been liking al- 
ways that beautiful sound when he is in bed. Also, he 
like always that music just so he like the jewel, the pic- 
ture, the fine clothes. He is always being artist. He have 
the grand mind. He has been to think the grand thought 
all the time. Last Sunday he must go with a boat to Santa 
Cruz, so he shall have been to ask his friend to sleep in his 
room while he shall have been gone. That friend ! Ah, 
how he was the Tmdito! The voice hellissima of that Tom- 
cat it wake him in the night, and he has thrown all of 
everything from the window of that Signor Fouga. The 
picture, they have gone, also the statue, and the carpet. 
Then that bad friend he also throw the bed and the chair. 
Then that poor Tom-cat has been kill. Signor Fouga shall 
look for that bad friend, so he shall be kill, too. 

Il Signor Lord Talbotclipton. — How he has been being 
the noble race, Sir Talbotclif ton. He has live in the House 
of Milords all the time ! Next week he shall go away. It 
is that secret ! He has the true friend in that Signor 
McCarthy, and spend all the year at the beautiful Monte 
Carlo. They make the grand fortune. Signor McCarthy 
he has been sure of that grand fortune ! Sir Talbot has 
been asking to Signor McCarthy if they shall make that 
grand fortune. Then Signor McCarthy he has winked 
both his other eye ! 

Il Dottore McjSojtt — The learned man, il Dottore Hark- 
ness, has told last night about his noble friend ;7 Dottore 
McNutt for the Academies of Scienzia. It was about the 
beautiful hat of white which the McNutt has being got when 
he was young. That was so long as being fifty year. It 
was coming from the ruin of Pompeii for two thousand 
year. King Victor Immanuele and the General Garibaldi 
they have told the McNutt he can have that hat. The 
McNutt he is the brave man ! H. B. 



A Good Child 
is usually healthy, and both conditions are developed hy use of 
proper food. The Gail Borden Eagle Brand Condensed Milk is the 
best infants' food ; so easily prepared that improper feeding is inex- 
cusable and unnecessary. 

Queen Victoria suffers from rheumatism severely. Her daily 
beverage is confined to mineral water with a slight addition of Moet 
<fc Chandon Champagne. At Aix-les-Bains last spring she bought 
the entire vintage remaining over from the Comet year of 1874. — 
Freeman's Journal. 



Walter Baker&Go. 

Special and Important Notice. 



r-ft In view of 1 
~HJ fa/ions of tin 

CV. ^ U'rafipe 



the many imi- 
the Labels and 
uppers of our va- 
rious preparations of 
Chocolate and Cocoa 
which have recently 
appeared in different 
'parts of the country, 
jwc would caution con- 
sumers that, in order 
to 7iiakc sure of secur- 
ing the genuine articles manufactured 
by us, they must ask particularly 
for and see that they are supplied 
only with those bearing on each 
package the name of Walter 
Baker & Co., or W. Baker & Co., 
Dorchester, riass. 

NONE OTHERS GENUINE. 




THE WENBflN, 



Northwest Corner 
Sutter and 
Mason Streets. 



To be Completed About Aug. 15, 1895. 



A few more offices left in this eleganc building, 
which is already recognized as one of the most 
complete and thoroughly appointed structures 
of its kind on the coast, suitable for doctors, 
dentists, and professional men generally. Lib- 
eral inducements to good tenants. 
Apply to 



EASTON, ELDRIDGE & CO., 



638 MARKET ST. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1805, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four and eight-tenths (4 8-10) per cent, per annum on term deposits, 
and four (4) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after MONDAY, July 1, 1895. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Office — 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1895. a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four and eight-tenths (4 8-10) per cent, per annum on term deposits, 
and four (4) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and afte. MONDAY, July 1, 1895. Dividends not called for are 
added to and bear the same rate of dividend as the principal, from and 
after July 1, 1895. CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending June 30th, 1895, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four and eight-tenths (4 8-10) per cent, per annum on Term De- 
posits, and four (4) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday, July 1, 1895. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office— 526 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For tne half year ending with the 30th of June, 1*95, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate per annum of four and eight-tenths (4 8-10) per cent on 
term deposits and four (4) per cent on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Monday, the 1st of July, 1895. 

Office— 532 California street, cor. Webb LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, Sun Francisco, June 28, 181)5. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four and one-quarter (J^) per cent, per annum on 
all deposits for the six mouths ending June 30, 1895, free from all taxes, and 
payable on and after July 1, 1895. ROBERT J. TOBTN, Secretary. 



REMOVED TO 824 MARKET STREET, PHELAN BU1LDINO. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1895. 




The Annual Report Of 
The 
Insurance Commissioner. 



The annual report of State 
Insurance Commissioner Hig- 
gins is a breezy document, just 
full of enough hard common 
sense to make it disagreeable for some people in the busi- 
ness possessed of more capacity for money making than 
conscience. This report differs from the ordinary official 
excuse for drawing a salary from the commonwealth — it is 
readable from beginning to end. It would not be strange 
should a second edition be necessary to supply the demand, 
the matter being as interesting to the public, generally 
uninitiated in the secret quirks and turns of this branch of 
business, as it will be to the men who run the mill at the 
public expense. Among the matters treated of by the 
Commissioner is the renewal of suits to the Federal Courts, 
brought up by the suit brought by Mrs. A. C. Avy against 
the Massachusetts Benefit Life Association for insurance 
due, upon which Mr. Higgins was called to pass. In his 
decision, which is quite lengthy, he says: " It is too com- 
mon practice for some of these great corporations to re- 
ceive for many years the money of the deceased, and, at 
his death to refuse to carry out its part of the sacred and 
written contract, and to seek by legal technicalities or by 
other reprehensible methods to avoid the payment of the 
policy. * * * This statute (section 595 of the Political 
Code) seeks to place in the hands of the beneficiaries a 
weapon which will, in some degree, atone for the weakness 
of the stricken and, perhaps, helpless family and the 
strength which inheres in the great aggregation of capi- 
tal. My decision, therefore, is that if said case of Avy vs. 
Massachusetts Benefit Life Association is transferred to 
the Federal Courts, I will immediately revoke the certifi- 
cate of said corporation to do business in the State." 



Some Sample The reason given for the revocation of the 
Sinks certificate of the Mutual Life Association 

For Capital. of America is that "as almost one-third 
of the entire membership of the company 
is reported by it to be in California, and as I am clearly of 
the opinion that the company cannot and will not meet its 
obligations in full, the action I have taken in the matter 
seems to be just and proper. The decision in the Hooper 
case is given in full. In it the Supreme Court of the 
United States upholds the constitutionality of the Cali- 
fornia statute prohibiting brokers from placing insurance 
in companies unauthorized to do business within the State. 
The report does not deal very favorably with the subject 
of cut rates, the statement being made that after deduct- 
ing the re-insurance reserve, and a reasonable amount of 
surplus, to meet the conflagration hazard, the net profit is 
not so great that managers can afford to write risks for a 
small per cent, of the actual cost, which is being done 
daily. The belief is also expressed that security is more 
desirable than cheapness." The transfer of the business of 
the Fraternal Life Association of San Francisco to an 
Eastern organization is also criticised for the reason that 
suspicion is aroused against the "financial standing or 
business management of any company willing to take over 
bodily without medical examination, the policy holders of 
another association, especially if it has been in existence 
for years." The Mutual Relief Association, of Petaluma, 
is referred to sarcastically as an ' 'exceedingly good place 
to deposit hard-earned wages for future use," while the 
hope is expressed "that any nefarious designs of the 
officers may be thwarted," all of which tend to convince 
the public of a lack of confidence in this association on the 
part of the Commissioner. Numerous recommendations 
are made which should be carried out as soon as possible. 
The receipts for the year were $32,934.13. The expenses 
were only 16.750.16, leaving a balance to the credit of the 
Commission of $26,183.37. 

COLONEL J. B. LOW, the well-known mining expert, 
who recently reported on the Brunswick lode for the 
Comatock mining companies, arrived in town during the 
week Cor a short visit. His professional labors have been 
keeping him busy early and late for some time past. 



Comstook With the close of the stock boards for the 
Mining midsummer holidays comes the hope that an 
Shares. end has also been reached of the dull times 
which exerted such a disastrous influence on 
speculation in Comstook shares. Dealers of all classes are 
inclined to take a more cheerful view of things, now that 
the companies are reaching out for new ore bodies in the 
direction of the Brunswick lode. That they will find ore 
there no one for a moment doubts, but the prospect for 
another bonanza is what will give a new impetus to trad- 
ing, and build up the business again to a point where there, 
will be money in it. AVork began during the week on the 
new acquisitions of the Comstock companies on the Bruns- 
wick. An incline winze will be sunk on the ledge, to begin 
with, under the direction of Superintendent P. Kervin, who 
has been appointed to look after the development of this 
ground. This probably had as much, if not more, to do 
with the recent advance in Hale and Norcross stock as the 
possibility of a decision from the Supreme Court, who will 
probably conclude to come down off' their perch like Colonel 
Scott's coon, before the threat to dynamite them is carried 
into effect, as outlined in the Call a few days ago. While 
the majority of the shareholders of this company probably 
would not object to starving the Justices into subjection, 
there are few of them who would care to go quite as far 
as murder in the barbarous manner suggested. Outside 
of the stocks affected by the Brunswick lode decision, the 
market has shown but little vitality. Still, there is a pro- 
ject to open up a scheme at the Gold Hill end of the lode, 
which ought to help matters there, and it undoubtedly 
will whem matters get a little further ahead than now. 
Another Gold The old Pioneer Mine, owned by the late 
Mine Sold. Senator Fair and his partner Davis, has 
been sold in Boston, and many people who 
claimed control of the property under private agreement 
with the owners are now puzzling over the proposition, 
how they got left. The agent for the purchasers at the 
other end is Pierre Humbert, brother to the talented and 
popular engineer of the Folsom Dam, who died rather sud- 
denly some years ago. The promoter who has made a 
good bit of money out of the sale is James M. Brazell, who 
for many years was closely connected with the manage- 
ment of leading Comstock mines, The price paid by the 
Bostonese was a liberal one, which proves that they are 
" sports " when they take hold of anything. The figure 
is said to be $500,000. It has always been claimed by the 
numerous vendors who were hawking this property all 
over creation a few months ago, that the output was $5,000 
per month. This is rather in excess of the annual product, 
which might more correctly be placed at between $36,000 
and $40,000 per annum. Every one who knows Mr. Brazell 
will be pleased to learn that fortune has now turned his 
way, with the tide running like a mill race. Representa- 
tives of the new owners are in town. The mine has been 
well opened up, and the reserves of ore on hand are calcu- 
lated as sufficient to keep the mill running for a couple of 
years at the same rate as at present. 

Mines in Mining men are beginning to move around 
Good Demand, again throughout the northern portion of 
the State on the lookout for mining in- 
vestments. It is a subject for congratulation that a dis- 
position is now shown to take hold of small prospects, with 
the intention of spending some money on them to prove 
their worth. In this way a mine is bound to be uncovered 
in some quarter with better results in the end than chas- 
ing a connection with some broken off pay chute in a "go- 
ing concern," as our Anglo-maniacal friends would put it. 
There is also a strong disposition apparent to eschew old 
evils in the selection of "nobodies" for experts, to the ex- 
clusion of prominent men in the profession, who have had 
to sit quietly by in the past while fortunes have been dissi- 
pated under the mis-direction of imported scalawags and 
bogus professors of mineralogy. The gentry have landed 
at the end of their rope, which no one will regret but then- 
confederates and sympathizers, who are rapidly drifting 
the same way themselves. 
The Duncan We understand the old Duncan mine is 
Heard again to be exploited abroad, this time 

From Again, under the auspices of Hamilton Smith. 
Expert Janin has been examining the 
ground for the benefit of promoters of the latest "dicker." 



July fi. 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IS 




What ihr d«til »rt thou'" 
"One that win p!»t tbc.i. 1 .: air. with ■. 



THERE unhappy man in town during 

the holidays, and that one Is known as a delinquent 
barber. His delinquency, according to tonaorial phrase- 
in keeping liis shop open after union hours. 
What the barbers In bam- will do to their guilty brother is 
- me have suggested thai be should have one 
if his whiskers and "is.' eye-brow kept shaved for a 
month, but it is believed that a still more awful punish- 
ment is in reserve for him. From our particular barber, 
who is Deputy Grand Shampoo of the National Union, we 
have learned thai this delinquent barber will be compelled 
to shave every customer in silence for a whole week. So 
cruel a penalty should not be permitted to be inflicted, for 
it can only end in death the first day. 

LET us hope it is not true that the Prince of Wales is 
coming over to New York for the yacht race. The 

last time he was in this self-respecting republic the women 
of fashionable New York fought for the cherry stones that 
he left on his plate at a banquet, and tore one another's 
- s in the struggle to sit for an instant on the chair 
that had held the regal person. Princess Eulalie stared 
with amazement at the awed faces of the aristocracy of 
our metropolis when they collected to bow before her. 
Royal men and women are used to profound deference, but 
they are not accustomed to divine honors. The second 
coming of the Prince of Wales would stir New York far 
more deeply than the second coming of the Savior. 

M ISS Beatrice Harraden was not to blame, of course, 
± l for the circus advertising given her story of "The 
Remittance Man " in advance, but her reputation cannot 
stand many more three-sheet-poster booms. The little 
tale in Sunday's Examiner was as mild, and moral, and un- 
exciting as a cup of skimmed milk, whereas, in order to 
come up to specifications, it should have been as lurid as 
the "Quick or the Dead" and "She" combined. Miss 
Harraden wrote a sweet, and natural, and affecting story 
in '■ Ships that Pass in the Night," but if her further pro- 
gress in literature is to be preceded by a newspaper syndi- 
cate calliope she will be as congruous to the critical eye as 
a white rabbit in a cage built for a Numidian lion. 

ONE of our daily papers now publishes a department of 
"Divorce Suits Begun," directly over the announce- 
ments of " Marriages " and "Deaths." The divorce pro- 
ceedings are thus tersely summarized: "John Doe against 
Jane Doe;" "Rachel Roe against Richard Roe," and so 
forth. Suggestions in this regard may seem impertinent, 
but yet it would appear that a more suitable arrange- 
ment of the matter would be to sandwich the divorce de- 
partment between the "Marriages " and the "Deaths." 

GRADUALLY the mighty John L.- Sullivan is descend- 
ing the sad path of the "has-been. He is to accept a 
beggarly $10,000 a year to appear in a play with his con- 
queror, Corbett. In the end the once champion will sink 
to the position of Professor of Physical Culture in Yale or 
Harvard, at a salary little better than that of the Presi- 
dent of the institution. 

LADY DOUGLAS has been dazzling the Alamedans 
with a stunning pair of bloomers, made of green and 
scarlet silk, especially for her bicycle riding. Lord Sholto 
Douglas is said to aim're the effect. Now that the 
British aristocracy have thus set the fashion, bloomers of 
loud silk stripes may be expected to bourgeon and blossom 
in Alameda's shady avenues. 

THE news that New York's Four Hundred has decided 
to go into bloomers when it mounts the bicycle at New- 
port will teach a great moral lesson to millions of women 
in the United States. It is a revelation from on high that 
the bloomer is modest. 

DURRANT is said to be keeping up his medical studies, 
while in jail awaiting trial on the charge of murder. 
Perhaps he thinks his experience will be useful to him in 
other cases of confinement. 



THE freshes! addition to our crop of titles u Mi-.. 1 1,- 
llu King Eng, M 1) . of the Medical College of Phila- 
delphia. She has returned to Poo ("how duly licensed to 

kill Or Cure, and in the hospital there she will alternate 

boluses with the Bible and castor oil with tracts. Whether 
she will convert more bodies into cold clay or more souls 
Into Asiat i c angels remains to be seen, but the Idea i- a 
novel ,.n. ■. Fancy in California Dr, O'Donnell attending a 

patient and saying "Take these powders three times a 
day and read the penitential psalms between the dosesl" 

or "Use this gargle every hour and read this tract on 

hell." lint he could do it all right if he had to. 

His honor the Mayor wanted Mr. Phelan to be one of 
the Election Commissioners but the gentleman "has 
the misfortune " according to Mr. Sutro to be a million- 
aire." So the chief magistrate to illustrate how cranky he 
can be has appointed a carpenter of pronounced Kalloch- 
and-Kearny views to fill the place, Mr. Phelan must feel 
highly complimented at the second choice. He is well out 
of the unenviable position while curiously enough the new 
appointee's name is "Wellin." 

THE latest from Oakland is to the effect that the A. P. 
A. has a contract with Mayor Davie to fill all the 
vacancies with members of its party. May the devil im- 
pinge his sharpest claws on every man or woman who 
makes a cocktail out of religion and politics and stirs it up 
with the spoon of discord! May all the foul fiends fatten 
on Papist and Protestant alike who would blast the beauty 
of our laws by regulating the belief of even the policeman 
on his beat. Selahl 

SO the Mayor would like to put the Wells Statue on 
Twin Peaks, with Mr. Broderick's and Mr. Cresswell's 
names stamped on the forehead! Taking the source from 
whence the scurrilous wish comes it is harmless, but a few 
more departures from the line of decency may yet place 
Mr. Sutro in a very unpleasant position. His election was 
a huge mistake. It is now in order to see that the error 
be as limited in consequence as possible. 

VANISHED the pomp and the pageant again 
Of the glorious Fourth of July, 
And nothing remains but the sob and the pain 

Of the boy with a squib in his eye. 
The eagle has squealed, the music has pealed, 

The rocket has fizzled and hissed ; 
Anna Shaw and her Susie have struck a new Held, 
And neither will ever be missed. 

SALMON fishing has of late years become a great at- 
traction of the bay of Monterey. It is fine sport to 
take the big fish with trolling tackle. Last week a mon- 
ster, weighing 47} pounds, was caught near Santa Cruz. 
It is a question whether the salmon or the sirens are the 
chief allurements of that watering place to certain San 
Franciscans this season. 

PROFESSOR Davidson gave too little attention to ap- 
plied science. Had he been thoughtful enough to take 
a little leisure and wind the loose end of a parallel of lati- 
tude around President Cleveland's leg, he would not in his 
old age be turned out of office with nothing but his reputa- 
tion to subsist on. 

THE Petalwmian says that no scandals, bitterness, or 
sensationalism shall enter into its columns. All right, 
but look out for squalls when the local branch of the Y. M. 
C. A. gets on to the followers of applied Christianity. You 
will be shocked at the possibilities of the English language. 

THE attention of the Rev. Mr. Hobart, Baptist, of 
Oakland, is called to the death of Professor Huxley. 
Here is an opportunity to show that those who war upon 
the faith are not long for this world. Huxley was barely 
past seventy when he was cut down. 

A CHANGE has come over the spirit of our metropolitan 
journalism. When one "great daily" commends a 
rival for starting a subscription list in aid of the fire 
sufferers, the newspaper millenium must be approaching'. 

THERE is a great deal of cackling going on in Canada, 
but it is perfectly justifiable. She is importing be- 
tween forty and fifty thousand eggs a month into the 
United States. 

THE man who spends all his money bicycling suggests 
the mediaeval punishment of being broken on a wheel. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1895. 




DOCTOR T. D. Crothers gives a new idea of the causes 
which produce a craving for strong drink in the Popu- 
lar Health Magazine. He thinks that one of those causes 
is impure air, and that "the poison from defective oxida- 
tion of the blood, together with imperfect elimination of 
waste products, is a very active factor in inebriety." He 
follows up this statement by a scientific analysis of the 
subject, and it appears to us that he gives good reasons 
for his views. 

Dr. Max Nordau has an article entitled "Society's Pro- 
tection from Degeneration,'' in the July number of the 
Forum. Dr. Nordau writes under the impression that 
his views on "Degeneration'' have been accepted by the 
world at large, and he now tells us to what extent the de- 
generate in art and literature degrades society, and he 
points out what he believes to be the best method by 
which society can defend itself against the evils of the day. 
This is Dr. Nordau's first appearance in an American 
periodical. 

Since Queen Victoria's son-in-law, the Marquis of Lome, 
was Governor-General of Canada he is constantly dabbling 
in every question that affects Canadian interests, as if his 
mediocre mind could grasp every great question with 
statesmanlike ability. It is for this reason, no doubt, that 
he has written an article in the North American Review, in 
which he says that "Lord Russell, of Kilowen, settled the 
Bering Sea question," while the world at large still be- 
lieves that that question requires as much "settling" as 
ever. But the North American will publish anything that 
is written by the son-in-law of a queen. 

"How Marcus Whitman Saved Oregon" to the Union 
reads like a romance, and yet it is only a sober account of 
how that intrepid pioneer traveled 4000 miles from Oregon to 
Washington, through a wild West then almost unknown, to 
be in time to change the policy of the government and save 
that territory to the Republic. In June, 1842, he set his 
face towards the West again, leading nearly 1000 Amer- 
icans, with 225 wagons, over the steep slopes of the Blue 
Mountains, another Pathfinder and a successful one, too. 
The story is patriotic and full of frontier incidents. 

Tolstoy's feet are of clay, after all! He is not a demi- 
god, but very much of a man, with all a man's frailties. 
So, at least, says Frau Anne Seuron, who was for many 
years a governess in the house of the great Russian novel- 
ist, in a book recently published in Berlin. She says that 
Tolstoy is miserly, hypocritical, and a despot, and that he 
is not at all the man fancy paints him. We have not seen 
Frau Seuron's book, but we hope time will prove that it 
was written for revenue more than for truth. 

Dean Howells tells us that he has Tolstoy's authority for 
saying that the final "y" should be used in the Count's 
name. 

The Century for July contains a notable speech written 
by Daniel Webster, never before published, and probably 
never delivered. It is in Mr. Webster's handwriting and 
bears the indorsement, "Notes and Memorinda for a 
Speech on my Resolutions." The "resolutions" to which 
he referred to wore his demands for information from Mr. 
Madison's government regarding the treatment of the 
United States by Napoleon which led to the friction be- 
tween this country and France in ISIS. 

The Metaphysical Magazine claims to lie the organ of 
"Universal Brotherhood." It says that the world re- 
quires no creed. "The Lord never had a creed. The 
universe was created without one, and by Infinite Intelli- 
gence was pronounced whole and perfect." It approvingly 
quotes Buddha's words. "Religion is the realization of the 
true." Its conceptions of spiritual life appear to us to be 
a thirst for knowledge, taking nothing for granted but the 
existence of a Supreme Something — beyond. 



Percival Lowell's paper on Mars, in the Atlantic for 
July, quickens the waning interest of the public by giving 
more and more reasons for believing that planet to be in- 
habited. He bears special stress on the artificial appear- 
ance of the canals, to which the present article is devoted. 

Richard Harding Davis discusses the question of the 
morality, or the immorality, of the American colony in 
Paris in Harper's Magazine. The article is littered with 
what Zola calls "spice that is nice, and spice that is not." 

Scribner's Magazine, in an article on Manners, says that 
" intelligent foreigners who have observed us closely say 
that we are the rudest and the kindest people in the world. " 

McGlure's Magazine, beginning with the July number, is 
to be reduced to ten cents a month, or $1 a year. 

English and American Wine Drinkers. 

According to Ridley's Wine rmrf Trade Circular, the ruling quota- 
tions for familiar brands of champagne in the London market are: 

Pommery Sec, 83 to 88 shillings. Moet, 75 shillings, ferrier, 72 
shillings, Murom, 70 to 75}£ shillings. 

While the consumer here pays about the same price for all brands 
of reputable champagnes, and thereby creates the impression that 
one wine is about the same as another to him as long as it is a re- 
putable champagne, the English wine-drinker is always willing to 
pay the highest price for what he considers the best wine, and 
though we have in our country as good connoisseurs as there are in 
England, yet the average American will rarely take the time and the 
trouble to try the relative merits of the different brands, and too 
often leaves to the knight of the b*.r or the garcon the choice of the 
brand. — New York Recorder. 

Warren White Sulphur Springs, 



VIRGINIA 



C W. CULLEN & SON, 
Owners and Proprietors. 

Eight different waters, namely: White, Red, and 
Season of 1895 Blue Sulphur, Alum. Iron, Arsenic. Chalybeate, and 

opens June 1st. Lithia On top of the " Three Top Range " of the 

Masamitten chain of Mountains. Elevation 2100 

feet above the sea. No Mosquitoes, Gnats, or 

Malaria. 

Tppmr, Per week, one person, 115; per month, one person, 
1 01 lUO . HO; two persons in one room $70. Special rates to 
parties of three or more. 
Good Ashing, boating, and Bathing. Distance from 
Richmond & Danville Railroad, one mile; distance 
from Norfolk & Western, three miles; distance from 
Baltimore and Ohio, four miles. 

Oldest Summer Resort in the United States, Established 1734 

The Stoneman House, 

YOSEMITE VALLEY. 

The only hotel in the valley supplied with all modern con- 
veniences and improvements. From the verandas of the 
Stoneman the following famous points are clearly visible: 
Eagle Peak, Yosemite Falls, Indian Canyon, Royal Arches, 
North Dome, Washington Column, Tenaya Canyon, Cloud's 
Rest, Half Dome, and Grizzly Moran and Glacier Points. 
The rates of this hotel are from $2 to $4 per day. according to 
room or European plan. The rooms are all newly furnished, 
the beds unsurpassed, the table excellent, and the entire 
management above criticism. 

J. J. COOK. Proprietor. 



Mendenhall Springs. 



Near Livermnre, Alameda County, California. Four 
hours bj rail and stage. Beautiful mountain scenery. 
Climate unsurpassed. The water of these springs 
possess greai medicinal qualities. Desirable family 
resorl ; terms moderate. Send for circular giving full 
particulars. 



LIVERMORE, Cai. 



Win. M. Mendenhall, Proprietor. 



Pope House 



SANTA CRUZ Ca 



and < 'OTTAGES. This well-known and popular 
Resorl Is now open for the reception of guests. 
Separate Cottages for families. Tennis and 
l 'roquet. Electric Cars to the beach and baths. 



VICHY SPRINGS 



MENDOCINO COUNTY. Three miles from 
5) rjkiah, the terminus of the S, P, and N. P. 

Railway. Only known natural electric water 
Warm "champagne 11 baths Situation, loca- 
tion, and scenery not surpassed. Terms. $12 to $14 per week. Post-omce 
and telephone at springs, WILLIAM DOOLAN, Proprietor. 



July 6 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



'7 





A BOOK 

\ Milt* 


OF THE W 







WEEK.* 

.'. hours from 
cliati-au. where ;it 
adoring husband," 
r of the Floren- 
Catberiae de Medici, gave .1 t rairio interest to the 

le " in tlieit 
town by the Loire, and the mystery and romance "f 
the past lend a < lassie interest ■ rwisc dull, ordi- 

nary, ami matter-of-fact life which tin- modem town of 
this workaday age, which is made so 
rich by tbi the past and the wonders of thepres 

ent hour. Hut it is not of the dead past, but of the living 
thai Helen Cboate Prince tells us in "The 
Story of Christine Roche fort," and yet the old atmosphere 
of the place penetrates, unconsciously, into the tale "like 
the scent of a dead rose." After reading the "Overture" 
to the story we admit that we were half disposed to read 
no more, because of its many adjectives, its misty refer- 
9 to a half-forgotten past, its biographical haze, and 
it^ strained efforts at historical dispatch, which would re- 
quire an apocalypse of inspiration to remember in all their 
detail. But the first chapters of the book prove that Helen 
Choate Prince can write clearly when she likes, and the 
conclusion shows that she can plot with skill and sustain 
the interest in her characters to the close. The hero of 
the story. Gaston Rochefort. the wealthy young mill owner 
of Blois. is a character worthy of Marion Crawford, and 
he is not unlike some of Crawford's characters in moral 
Strength and manliness. He has all the ennobling virtues 
which Scott loved to portray, and he neither considers the 
noble birth nor the genteel poverty of Christine D'Arc}', 
the daughter of a Countess, when he offers her his fortune 
and asks her for her hand. But if the D'Arcys are poor 
they are proud, and were it not for the grandmother of 
Christine, the old Marquise du Chatelet, pride might have 
triumphed, and Gaston Rochefort might have loved in vain. 
But there is ''an alert cock of the grandmother's cap" 
when she finds that the young man is a millionaire, and 
although she professes to believe that "men are all bad, 
but some are worse, damn them," yet she encourages the 
match, and the young people are married, while the old 
lady continues to tell her grand-daughter that "men are 
well enough in their way, but not one of them is worth a 
headache." But it is now that the story begins to unravel. 
Gaston Rochefort adores his wife, while she merely respects 
and admires her husband. He looks upon her as a violinist 
might look on a Stradivarius, owned by a collector and 
carefully kept shut up in a glass case ; she looks on him as 
a good man — nothing more. There is a blank in the wife's 
life and the husband knows it, and he, manly, self-reliant, 
young, and rich, thirsts to hear her say the words, "Gas- 
ton, I love you." And it is here that Paul de Martel comes 
upon the scene. He is by birth an aristocrat, by political 
principles an anarchist, and he comes to Blois to ' ' propa- 
gate the faith. " Gaston knew him in Paris before he had 
become an anarchist, and he invited him to 
his house before he knew his mission. From 
the first, Christine Rochefort loves Paul de 
Martel, but it is a pure love ; she is not 
even conscious of it, for it is such a love as 
Hugo pictures more than once — something 
that is not quite platonic, but it is called 
into existence because of Christine's love 
for the picturesque, stirred by a melodious 
voice and a position that is heroic in its self- 
abnegation. And so she becomes the pupil 
of the anarchist, while he makes Blois his 
headquarters and keeps the people on the 
edge of the bloody knife of rapine and dis- 
order. Gaston Rochefort is working for 
the good of the people by evolution ; de Mar- 
tel is working for them by revolution; a 
word divides them, that is all. But de Mar- 
tel's work begins to tell. The men at the 
mills go out on strike ; time passes and hun- 
ger comes ; the multitude have no ears 
when want enters the household, and the 
mill is given to the torch, while the Roche- 
fort home is about to be added to the flames, 
but de Martel saves the house, and is after- 



wardj Meanwhile, 

th.it ascerbitous critic, the Marquise du Chatelet, tells 
line not to fret, for fret til wrinkles, ami 

wrinkles are worse than a ■ ! that the only 

way to enjoy life is to ■ ■ the sunshine; vive amuse- 

ment . A £11 the priests." But Gaston Rochefort does not 
take his handle from the plough ; he builds tin' mill, beeps 
up his private charities, continues to help the poor, even 
those who wronged him. and in the end the constant drop- 
ping wears the stone, and the charity that ope of 
Gods commands s.. affects his wife that, looking in his face 

one day. she utters the long-wished-for words : "GastOTJ, 

1 love yon ! " There are good moral lessons t" be learned 
from this story, and among them are the burning truths 
that the love of a good man is the touchstone of virtue. 
and that it is to evolution, and not revolution, that society 
will owe its coming regeneration. God may delay, but He 

dues not forget, and !!<• is patient because — Eternal. 

"•The Stoky of Christine RoCBOTORT," hy Helen Choate Prince. 
Houghton, Muffin & Co., Publishers, Boston. 

One of the busiest men in the city is P. F. McNuity, who has se- 
cured a large and fashionable trade in the manufacture of shoes. 
He will be found at 139 Post street, first Hoor of the Liebes building, 
where he is prepared to take orders, make perfect fitting shoes, and 
( f the best material. He has the reputation of giving perfect satis- 
faction, and is prompt in dealing with customers. 

Ladies' Turses, card cases, bill books and valises are among the 
new things in leather goods just received at Sanborn & Vail's. 



Office: Corner Grant ave. and 
Geary St., over "City of Paris." 
Entrance 14 Grant avenue. 



9 :S0 A M to 12 M 
2 to 4, 7 to 8 P M 



A. G. DEARDORFF, M. D. 



Residence: Baldwin Hotel. Telephone 5400. San Francisco, Cal. 

HENRY N. CLEMENT, 

Attorney-at- Law, 

Rooms 13 and 14, fourth floor, Mills Building, S. F. Telephone No. 855. 

RICHARD GIBSON, 

Attorney and Gounsellor-at-La\V. 

Room 8, (Third Floor) Mills Building. ■ San Francisco 

Dr. F. C. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 819 Market street 



Q)R. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 

114 Geary St., San Francisco. 



Dentist, 



l^ta Glass! 
Quick!! 

There's lots of snap and vim in this Hires' Root- 
eeer. There's lots of pleasure and good health in 
it, too. A delicious drink, a temperance drink, a 
home-made drink, a drink that delights the old and 
young. Be sure and get the genuine 

HIRES' 

Rootbeer 

A 25 cent package makes 5 gallons. Sold everywhere. 

The Chas. E. Hires Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1895. 




TO get benefit from the exercise of cycling the wheel- 
man should undoubtedly sit erect, so as to give his 
lungs as well as his legs a chance. There is danger in 
"wobbling," in going fast ou a crowded street, in riding 
close behind a street car or carriage, in turning out 
suddenly to get ahead of a vehicle, in taking off one's 
hat to a friend, in looking back, in watching one's front 
wheel, in taking the middle of the road, in suddenly chang- 
ing one's course when there are other cyclists coming on 
behind, in carrying a baby in front in a riding basket, in 
pulling too hard up a hill or against the wind, in going 
without a wrap to wear while cooling off. 

The weight required for a man of 150 pounds, exerting 
the force he would use in walking, has been placed so high 
in the preliminary experiments that it amounts to as much 
as the total weight of a common safety bicycle, that is 
about 25 pounds. Few people have an idea of the pressure 
in pounds which they exert in walking. On a good 
bicycle, with the wheels well blown up, the pres- 
sure and movement of an ordinary footstep carries 
them over 18 or 20 feet of spare, depending on the gear of 
the bicycle. The exertion is really less on a smooth, level 
surface than that put forth in walking. 

In crowded city streets the safest riders are on low sad- 
dles. Some of them are low enough so their toes can 
touch the pavement and they can stop without dismount- 
ing. They do not ride with the backs forming a semi- 
circle, and a few of them actually have brakes. They do 
not use the brakes more than once a month perhaps, but 
sometimes the brakes just prevent an accident, for no 
rider can reverse his pedals and stop quickly any more 
than a locomotive can be stopped by merely reversing the 
lever. 

If in ordering new machines riders will give the question 
of the length of handle-bars due consideration they will 
find that by measuring the distance between the shoulders, 
or between the seams of the coat, and then throwing the 
handle grips Is inches to 2 inches farther out on each side, 
or by measuring the distance over all from outside to out- 
side of the shoulder, they will obtain the proper length of 
bar for their own individual requirements. Any shorten- 
ing of the bar from the dimensions thus given will result 
in cramping the chest. 

The proposal to tax bicycles has been seriously dis- 
cussed by the Board of Supervisors, but is scarcely 
likely to be adopted by that body. It could hardly be 
constitutional, seeing that bicycles are already subject to 
taxation as personal property, and the imposition of a 
license would savor of double taxation. The license would 
be a hardship for the thousands of boys and girls who use 
bicycles, as well as for many workingmen who live far out 
in the suburbs and make use of the wheel to save time and 
money. 

Every wheelman knows it is almost impossible for a 
rider to resist the temptation to overwork himself. It 
has been said that it is easier to "train down too fine" on 
a bicycle than in any other way, and perhaps this is true. 
If so, all bicycle riders ought to keep a careful watch on 
their weight and not imagine that merely because they 
have become "hardened" to the exercise they are no 
longer affected by what would be likely to kill a horse. 

The amount of money invested in bicycle plants, where 
work on bicycles is exclusively done, is estimated by a well- 
posted bicycle man to be in the neighborhood of $13^000,- 
P00. Four years ago, he said, the sum was less than $1,- 
000,11011, and two years ago it was not over $3,000,000. 



Those wbo have tested the quality of the J. F. Cutter brand of 
Kentucky Bourbon pronounce it the bast whiskey in tbe market. 
It has stood the test of years, and has never lost its popularity. 
E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, are the Pacific Coast Agents for 
the celebrated J. F. Cutter and Argonaut brands of Kentucky Bour- 
bon. These brands of whiskey are excellent for medicinal purposes. 



Implements 

in every 




gis®.wem 



SUCCEUOR TO 

40lMARKETJi: 



<&to/<w arMOiue /ocmsWum 



RAMBLER BICYCLES 



— fire Pre-eminent. 



G. & J. Tires f 
Wood Rims 
Steel Rims 



Copper Rims Ji 




No. in. weight 15 and 18 lbs 
No. 14, weight 22 pounds 
No. 12, weight 25 pounds 
Ladies' E, weight 19V4 lbs 
Ladies' D, weight 24 lbs 



Thnc 41 R X/JIPUrV IB25 Market Street, San Francisco 
IHUd. M. D. VnlVllL/, 427 S. Spring Street, Los Angeles. 



THE BARNES SPECIAL. 



JOHN S. JOHNSON 
Rides a Barnes. 



The fastest rider in the 
world will hereafter be 
known as the " White 
Flyer," 



THE WHITE-RIMMED HUMMER IS THE COMER. 

Weight, 18 and 19 Lbs. Price, $105. 

Have you seen it ? It's a beauty. The forgings and frame connections 
are not visible. All the joints are "out of eight." There are no clumsy 
clips, bolts, or nuts to fasten the haudle tuirs and seat post. Every super- 
fluous prejecting part has been ingeniously dispensed with. Call at our 
store and svc the handsomest bicycle ever built. THE BARNES ARE 
WHITE FELLOES. 

Ur\r\\/UD % PH 16 and 18 DRUM M ST., 
rHJ*Jh\Cn QL W. San Francisco, Cal. 

COOPER CYCLE CO., Bush and Devisadero Sts., City Agents. 




July 6, 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



Tm "RoSEj^ 




LONGINGS.— tortf't reu-toot or ntm (to*t«m. 

IF I could hold your band; to-night 
Just tor ■ little while. ami Know 
That only I. of all the world. 

Possessed them so. 
A slender shape in that old chair. 

If I could see you here to-night, 
lietween me and the twilight pale, 
80 light and frail. 

Your cool white dress, its folding lost 
In one broad sweep of Mnidowy grey ; 

Yonr weary head just dropped aside 
That sweet old way: 

Bowed like a Howercup dashed with rain. 

The darkness crosing half your face, 
And just the glimmer of a smile 

For one to trace. 

If I could see your eyes that reach 

Far out into the farthest sky. 
Where pass the trail of dying suns, 

The old years lie, 

Or touch your silent lips to-night, 

And steal the sadness from their smile, 

And find the last kiss they bare kept 
This weary while! 

If it could he ? Oh, all in vain 
The restless trouble of my soul 

Sets, as the great tides of the moon, 
Toward your control I 

In vain the longings of the lips, 
The eye's desire, and the pain; 

The hunger of the heart, O Love, 
Is it in vain ? 



GOD'S MUSIC— F. E. WEATHERLY- 

Since ever the world was fashioned, 

Water and air and sod, 
A music of divers meaning 

Has flowed from the hand of God. 
In valley and gorge and upland, 

On stormy mountain height, 
He makes Him a harp in the forest, 

He sweeps the chords with might. 
He puts forth his hand to the ocean, 

He speaks and the waters flow,— 

Now in a chorus of thunder, 

Now in a cadence low. 
He touches the waving flower-bells, 

He plays on the woodland streams 
A tender song— like a mother 

Sings to her child in dreams. 
But the music divinest and dearest, 

Since ever the years began, 
Is the manifold passionate music 

He draws from the heart of man 1 

IF YOU WERE M\NEI-lohoon world. 



If you were mine, how fair the day and fleet — 
How swift the night and sweet, 

Till soft sunshine 
Would make us glad anew and life complete. 

If you were mine I 
Of love of friends, of hope of heaven forlorn 
Their loss I'd laugh to scorn 

And not repine! 
I must be glad, though heaven and earth should mourn 

If you were mine ! 

Weary the waiting is for stolen hours, 
Though sweet forbidden flowers— 

Ah! Give Love's sign, 
And come! for, darling, love, life, all were ours, 

If you were mine ! 

IN SILENCE.—*/!)' RILEY SMITH IN SOMETIME. 

As loving friends sit sometimes hand in hand, 
Nor mar with sound the sweet speech of their eyes ; 
So in soft silence let us oftener kneel, 
Nor try with words to make God understand. 
Longing is prayer ; upon its wings we rise 
To where the airs of heaven around us steal. 



Eefcre You Buy Your 
1895 Wheel See the 



Strictly High G ade, 
All Late l.nprovenents. 

Also-*- 

"DEERE" 

Light Roadster, 
Best Value 

"DEERE" 

Model "A." 
Lowest Price. 
We can suit You a 

Deere Implement Gompanu. 



•I 



National." 




43-Senii for Catalogue. 
805 Market street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 




COR. 
MARKET ST. 

XlOV NESS AVE. 



AGENTS FDR 

^MSLEaltairBICYCLES 

— ' (ALUMINUM RIMS} 

ESSEX SPECIAL strictly high grade. 
WESTMINSTER medium. 

SAiV FRANCISCO. CAL, 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of CHARLES MEHRTENS, Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, A. C. Freese, administrator 
of the estate of Charles Mehrtens, deceased, to the Creditors of, and all 
persons having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them with the 
necessary vouchers, within four months after the first publication of this 
notice, to the said A. C. Freese, administrator of said estate, at his office, 
room No. 9, 319 Pine s treet, San Francisco, Cal., the same being his place 
for the transaction of the business of the said estate in the City and County 
of San Francisco, State of California. A. C. FREESE, 

Administrator of the Estate of Charles Mehrtens, deceased. 

Dated at San Francisco, June 15, 1895. 

J. D. Sullivan, attorney for Administrator. 

CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

CANDIES. 
CANDIES.— Don't leave the city without a box ot ROBERTS' Best. 



R. Cutlar, 41254 Post street. 



DENTISTS. 



DRUGGISTS. 
Evans's Poison Oak Specific. Positive cure. Sold by all druggists. 

MILLINERY. 
The Wonder Hat, Flower, and Feather Store, 1024-1028 Market street. 

RESTAURANTS. 
Franco-American Restaurant, 521 Montgomery street. F. Hitte. 



SURVEYORS. 
John A. Benson, Engineer. Dealer in Land Scrip. 430 Kearny St. 

HYGIENIC AIR COMPRESSORS. 
For automlzatlon purposes. 

THE CLEVELAND FAUCET CO., 208 Ellis St. 

VOCAL CULTURE. 
Miss Caroline Shlndler, Soprano. Vocal Culture. Hours, 1 to 3, 2416 Clay 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 

The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated). 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1895. 







NO silk is more often seen in the fashionable parasol 
than taffeta, and justly so, for it is certainly the most 
enduring of any of the lighl weaves, and in addition it. 
comes in all manner of pretty patterns and colors. In 
the matter of design the taste of to-day favors small 
figures. These are best for many reasons; first of all be- 
cause any pattern which is large and aggressive makes a 
lasting impression upon the beholder, and some kind friend 
is sure to think, if not to say, "the same old parasol." 

All kinds and sorts of skirts are worn in Paris, for each 
work-shop conceives and promulgates its own fashions. 
Very wide skirts are worn, medium skirts are worn, and 
even last year's skirts can make a brave showing provided 
they were made by a good dressmaker. The woman who 
asph-es to be well dressed can wear what she likes but 
mind who cuts it. Have your gowns made out of cheese- 
cloth or a horse blanket, but look to it that it is fashioned 
by a master hand. 

Flowers are the favorite patterns for both cloths and 
silks, some of them quite delicate, dainty and small, others 
very large and effective, and even gaucty at times. Cash- 
mere patterns also are frequently seen, while in other de- 
signs conventionalized flowers are placed so closely to- 
gether and colored so highly as to resemble cashmere pat- 
terns. Satins showing large, rich patterns are much in 
vogue for trains and evening dresses for older women. 

With the light costumes come back the batiste, pongee, 
and nainsook petticoat. Also the light surah ones, which 
are generally made up in color to harmonize with the dress 
worn with same. Lace skirts, that is, a very wide ruffle 
of lace around the bottom, are seen also. Some have 
narrow ribbon of the color to match the dress drawn 
through the lace and finished in small rosettes on each 
side. 

Waists are in every conceivable variety, and may be 
made up absolutely regardless of aught but the wearer's 
own individual taste. As a reasonable concession one is 
in it averse to adopting the wide sack paletot. Mainly on 
account of this fashion quite a number of new materials 
have been brought into requisition, similar to those used in 
male apparel. 

The cashmere patterns in silks are very new and very 
much liked for separate bodices. A great many fancy 
buttons of mock diamonds and colored stones, by the way, 
are being used on blouses. These buttons are arranged in 
clusters of two and three to hold the box pleats; or they 
sometimes trim the tight sleeve covering the forearm. 

A new outdoor garment hooks under the arm surplice 
shaped, and in front and back it falls perfectly straight, 
sometimes with square yoke on top and band around the 
bottom of velvet, and sometimes perfectly plain. The 
lining gives it the required brightening effect; it is gene- 
rally of very handsome brocade or satin. 

Steamer hats and hats for use on long railroad journeys, 
and also worn alike by elderly and by young women in the 
mountains during the summer, are of soft felt in Alpine 
shape banded around with three rows of narrow ribbon. 

Fob the bather who is wearied of the everlasting serge 
and other heavy materials, alpaca makes a good substi- 
tute, as it weighs less and does not retain the water in 
soggy folds, like the wool stuffs. 

Promenade costumes are of more neutral tints than 
heretofore, but have light colored accessories to brighten 
them up. Crepons are the leading materials for house and 
street wear. 

"When you want a fine suit of clothes, call at 12 Post street, and 
J. M. Litchfield, the military and merchant tailor, will furnish you 
with the best and finest in the city. He keeps constantly on hand 
the finest imported goods, and he has the reputation of pleasing his 
customers with the most perfect fits. His long experience in the 
business and prompt attention to customers has made him popular. 



New wnatcom. 



Washington, 

Is at the head ol Bellingham Bay, on Puget Sound. It is the North- 
west City of the State of Washington; population about 10,000. 
It is the third city in size and wealth in Western Washington. All 
its industries are thriving. 

IT HAS ADVANTAGES possessed by no other point in the State of 
Washington: the country is rich in coal, iron, and other minerals; 
it is rich in agricultural and timber land; the city is lighted by 
electricity; it has two electric street car lines; the water supply is 
from a large mountain lake 316 feet above the city front; the quan- 
tity of water is unlimited, and is used to drive machinery for 
manufacturing purposes. For domestic use it is unequaled. 

NEW WHATCOM is the home of the Bellingham Bay and British Colum- 
bia Railroad, and of the Bellingham Bay and Eastern Railroad; 
it is the American terminus of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and 
the Pacific Const terminus of the Great Northern Railroad; the 
Northern Pacific Railroad is making preparations to enter the city; 
its harbor is one of the best in the world; the steamships of the 
Pacific Coast S S. Company for the North all go there; steamers 
arrive at and depart daily from New Whatcom for all ports on 
Puget Sound. 



It is the Coming Great City. 




fl. D. 1900 

Will have retired 
all of the "lift and 
peek" typewriting 
machines. 

The Williams is the first 
standard typewriter to adopt 
Visible writing. Writes in 
plain sight. Does not use 
ribbons. Quickest learned. 
Easiest operated. Does the 
finest work yet done by a 
machine. Proof at the Pacific 
Coast Agency. 



409 Washington St., 

San Francisco 



FaGifiG States Type Foundry. 

The News Letter's new dress was cast by Pacific States Type Foundry 

Cresta Blanca Souvenir Go ^ Medal, 

Paris Expos- 

Vintag'eS. ition, 18S9. If your grocer will 

not furnish you the genuine 

Cresta Blanca wine, send to our salesrooms. 

Goods delivered free. 

WETMORE-BOWEN CO., 140 Montgomery St. 

BOTTLING CELLARS-LarUin and McAllister Sts., S. P. 
VTSEYARD, WINERY, and CELLARS— Livermore, Cal. 

Real Estate, Registration, and 
Generai Commission Business. 

THE MARY T. KELLEY GO., 



Office: Baldwin Annex, 930 Market 
Rooms 10 and 11. 



ROOM RENTING 
AGENCY, 



The place to go for all information regarding hotels, board- 
ing houses and furnished rooms in San Francisco. You can 
save money in your rates, as well as save your time, by call- 
ing at tins agency. Also information and assistance relative 
to all business propositions. 



ERNST H. 



LUDWIG Z< CO., 

The Model 

American 
Caterers. 



1206 Sutter St., S. F. 



Telephone 2388. 



P. & 



B BUILDING 
■ PAPER. 



Paraffine Paint Co., 



116 Battery St., S. F., Cal. 



' 



SAN FRAXCISCO SEWS III 



FOIBLES OF MENS FASHIONS. 



THE Influence which fasl r the impi 

■ 

uvention and iin- 
more than compen- 
■ ir any injury such changes may cause the manufac- 
turer it tin* workman. Whenever in the condition of 
human society it becomes apparent that the consumers 
dread change, and deprecate any change of fashion, and 
er every modification of fashion an offense, a death- 
blow will )>.• given to all inventive ingenuity. These p 
will always do the same thing, and in the same manner ; 
but let the taste of tin' consumers become variable, the 
.-1-irit of invention and of improvement will be powerfully 
stimulated. Tin- desire for too frequent radical changes 
in the style of men'.- garments, which has recently been 
manifi i ild not be encouraged, style.- should 

change but twice a year, in the spring and in the autumn. 

The costumes that have been devised for cycling so far 
are artistic and sensible. The sack coat is the only 
adaptable style for men: and knicker- 
bockers, more or less full, afford ample 
room, and. therefore, comfort in pedaling. 
The illustration herewith affects the Nor- 
folk style. The plaits are cut separate 
and laid on. The belt around the waist 
is of the same width as the plaits, and 
patch pockets are arranged at the side of 
the garment. Knickerbockers, longstock- 
ings, and regulation bicycle shoes complete 
a fetching costume. 

Word comes from the East that the As- 
cot is the choice of dressers who lay any 
pretentions to correctness of attire, and 
it's a prettj' safe prediction that they are 
going to be taken up here as soon as the 
" ,as season is fairly open. Another treat- 
ment of the Ascot scarf has jumped into favor among cyc- 
lists and horsemen — it is the hunting scarf, a twice-around 
Ascot with very wide band, which acts as a collar and is 
fastened to the undershirt or flannel shirt, thus giving a 
very genteel appearance in addition to comfort. 

A handsome fancy morning coat is shown in the accom- 
panying figure. The coat buttons three, and is finished 
with an outside breast pocket. The length 
of the skirt is about two inches less than 
usual. The edges are single stitched. The 
trousers measure nineteen at the knee and 
eighteen at the bottorn, and show a tendency 
toward the revival of pegtopism." It is 
predicted that the cutaway will, from this 
date, become the popular garment for daily 
wear, and that the business men, who have 
for so long been accustomed to wearing sack 
coats, will welcome the change. 





White collars should be worn whether the 
shirt be colored or not, while the cuffs should 
match the material of which the shirt is com- 
posed. The newest and most stylish color- 
ings are canary, light olive, and pale apple- 
green grounds, with very small, delicate self figures and 
spots. 

The attempted introduction of colored coatings, in greens 
and browns, appears to have ended in a fizzle. The public 
has not taken kindly to them, especially to the browns. 
Gray coatings, too, appear to be becoming less popular, 
and a somewhat general return is being made to black 
coats, while roughness of material continues to be a promi- 
nent feature. It can be thus said that a rough coat and a 
shiny hat are the symptoms of gentility, and a shiny coat 
and a rough hat those of shabbiness. 



For the finest variety of furnishing goods to select from, go to 
25 Kearny street, and John W. Carmany will fit you out in shirts, 
neckties, collars, cuffs, or underwear. He also keeps ladies shirts. 



«€V€RY 
OUSEKEEPER 
.-SHOULD US& 

(stioiene 

The new vegetable shortening. 
It meets the most exacting re- 
quirements, and is beside entirely 
free fr-jm theobjectionablecharac- 
teristics of lard, long known and 
long suffered. Now deliverance 
has come. With Cottolene, good 
cooking, good food and good 
health, are all assured. 
But you must be sure you get 
COTTOLENB 

evnd refuse 

all counter feits 

Beware of imitations made to sell 
on the merits and popularity of 

COTTOLENB. 

Refuse them all, and your grocer 
will then understand that you 
know exactly what you want. 
This will bring you satisfaction 
and save you disappointment. 

Bold In 8 and S pound pallia 

Mode only by 

THE N.K.FAIRBANK 

COMPANY, 

ST. LOUIS and 

Chicago, New York* 

Bolton* 




California Enterprise • 



American Condensed 
Milk Company. 



Factory, Marin County, Cal 



Main Office, 330 Pine street 



Combine Economy with 
Satisfaction by Using 



SoutntiGlfl Wellington Goal. 



A. F. dOHNS X GO. 



Financial Agents. 

Dealers in Bonds and Securities. 
632 Market street, room 9. 



MONEY LOANED. 
San Francisco, Cal. 




For the best value in 



HATS or CAPS 



G. Herrmann & Go. 

The Hatters, 

328 Kearny St., 
Near Pine. (Entire Building) 

The ONLY Retail Hatters 
having their own factory. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1895. 



i5UNBEAMS 




BELLEFIELD— Young Half-back gets his athletic tastes very 
legitimately. He comes of a very athletic family. Bloomfield — 
Is that so? Bellefield— Yes. His father once held up a train. He 
had an aunt who did some shoplifting, and an uncle who was quite 
noted for jumping board bills.— Chicago Tribune. 

Mrs. Neighborly— What are you going to make out of your son ? 
Mrs. Fondmother— We are going to make a great piano player out 
of him. " How far has he got ? " " He hasn't commenced to take 
lessons yet, but we are letting his hair grow."— Texas Siftings. 
When asked her favorite writer 
She owned her tastes incline 
To the one who has a check-book 
That he's willing oft to sign. — Ex. 
Petted Son— Father, 1 hate to confess it, but the fact is, my allow- 
ance is all gone. Indulgent Father— Well, I'll advance you some 
more. Have a good time while you're young, for when you're mar- 
ried you can't. — New York Weekly. 

The Parson (who wishes to do a little missionary work while on 
his trip abroad)— My dear young lady, do you love the Lord? Young- 
Lady (indignantly)— How impertinent of you to ask, sir! I've only 
known him two days.— Puck. 

Vacant store, sign — " To Let " ; 
Tenant was sold out for debt. 
That's no cause for great surprise- 
Fellow didn't advertise! — Printers* Ink. 
A Rochester boy spoke of bloomers. His mother said, in surprise, 
"Bloomers? What do you know about bloomers? " "Oh, I know 
what they are," said the boy; " they're puffed sleeves worn on the 
legs. ' ' — Rochester Post-Express. 

" I actually do believe that Mrs. Jibson thinks more of her dogs 
than she does of her children." " Well, if you lived next door to 
the Jibson young ones, as I do, you wouldn't blame her much." — 
Indianapolis Journal* 

On the street car; smiling young lady enters; a farmer gets up. 
"Oh, don't rise," she said, sweetly; " I can stand very well." " You 
can do just as you please about that, Miss, but I'm goin' to git out." 
— Peck's Sun. 

Soon will the little busy bee 

Improve each chance to lance 
His enemy, the city boy. 

Right through his outing pants.— Truth. 
Caller— I came in to be examined on my sanity. Doctor— What 
is the matter with you? Caller— I had a day off yesterday, and sat 
in the sun for three hours watching a game of ball.— Peck's Sun. 

First Cycler (nearing a road house)— Do you suppose we can get 
anything to drink there ? Second Cycler— Just look at the enor- 
mous aggregation of wheels in the carriage shed.— Life. 

Gillback— Is it true that you don't spend as much money now as 
you did before you were married? Packett— It is ; I wish I could say 
the same thing of my wife.— Judge. 

Teacher— Children, you should always respect your teacher. 
Now, Willie Green, tell me why you should respect me. Willie— 
On account of your age.— Puck. 

She— I want a sealskin sacque, George. He— But it's too warm 
now for sealskin. She— It won't be by the time I get it.— St. Louis 
Humorist. 

" The first thing that phrenologist exclaimed when he saw me was : 
' What a head ! '" " Where were you the night before ? "—Life. 

" Have you been very successful?" asked the shaving cup. "Yes," 
replied the razor, " I've made my mark."— Truth. 

When a man gets married is the only time in his life when he has 
on new clothes all through.— Yonkers Gazette. 

"Oh, do not take me away ! " cried the sofa. " I am the only sup- 
port of two innocent lovers."— Truth. 

" You ought to be in the insane asylum," said the water to the 
ice; "you're cracked."— Truth. 

" You think you know it all, don't you? " "Me? Lord, no! I'm 
married ? "—Syracuse Post. 

She (writing a letter)— What is a synonym for artistic ? He — 
Expensive.— Tid-Bits. 



Visit Laundry Farm, 
the terminus of the California Railway, Alameda County, for a pleas- 
ant day's outing, it is one of the most picturesque spots around the 
bay. No Sunday dancing and no liquors sold on the grounds. 

A novelty in the line of letter paper is manufactured out of waste 
silk by the Government paper factory of Japan for Deakin Bros., 
No. 8 New Montgomery street, under the Palace Hotel. It is unique. 
As they are retiring from business they offer it at $1.50 per box. 



BANKING. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 1862. 
Capital Paid Up, $3,000,000. Reserve Fund and Undivided Profits, $1,410,000 

Southeast Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 
HEAD OFFICE 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches — Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan* 
iamo, and Nelson, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Ta- 
coma, Washington. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank ; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of 
Sydney, Ld; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits , June 30, 1834 $24,061 ,791 27. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,627,052 43. 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B POND, Vice-President 

Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be seDt by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Olfice hours— 9. A. M. to 3 P. M. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100.000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class companies, or grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-California Bank. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California St., S. F. 

Capital actually paid up in Cash, $ 1.(hxi,(HKI. Reserve Fund $ 685.000 

Deposits, June 29, 1895, ¥30,472,837 66. Guaranteed Capital. .81,200,000 

OFFICERS— President, Edward Kruse; Vice-President, B. A. Becker; 
Second Vice-President, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Muller. 

Board of Directors— Edward Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Shoemann, 
A. C. Heineken, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steinhart, 
Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Capital authorized $6,000,000 | Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART ( Mana „„ 

p. n. lilienthaL) Manft e ers - 

WELLS, FARGO & CO/8 BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier | F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eld ridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 

Wm. Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin A. K. P. Harmon 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones J. B. Randol. 

CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK op san francisco. 

Cob. Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid-Up Capital J1,000,000. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond. 



July 6, 1895. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



THE "ISLES OF SAFETY." 

THIS Isolated -1 »- >t . where Captain Dreyfue ha 
three small Islands ofl 
if French Guiana, ;\ few degrees north of the 
Equator, :>ml except a narrow Boa frontage, are covered 
with tropical forests. Tho climate is simply murderous, 
tin death being the result "f standing bareheaded in 
the sun even for an instant. Prom November to June la 
the wet season, during which the average rainfall ^ lsn 
inches; yet the temperature is never less than B6 deg., 
and rises to 116 deg. during the four dry months. Convict 
>lii]is bound fur these "Islands of the Curst" generally sail 
either from the De de Re\ In the Bay of Biscay, or the Be 
d'Aiz in the- Mediterranean. A month is occupied by the 
voyage, the horrors of which are a fit prelude to those 
yet to come. Dressed in their convict garb) the prisoners 
are confined in batches of fifty in great iron cages on the 
spar deck. Benches are placed round the Bides of the 
cage, and hammocks arc slung at night. But day and 
i) i-^ht they are watched by guards standing beside loaded 
mitrailleuses, ready to lire at the first sign of mutiny. 
Sometimes, indeed, such outbreaks do occur, but they are 
invariably quelled with remorseless severity. The horrors 
of the passage are too repulsive for description, the scenes 
resembling rather those observable a century or two back 
than what one would associate with the present times. 
On the arrival of the prisoners at the lies de Salut they 
are taken to the "Camp," a clearing occupied by strongly 
built iron-barred huts, furnished with double rows of ham- 
mocks. But at night the foetid atmosphere within, com- 
bined with the noisome vapors of the outer air and the 
ever-present swarms of stinging insects, render any but 
the sleep of exhaustion impossible. From the moment of 
his arrival the convict has no name. He is known only by 
the number of his hammock. The new arrivals are put to 
the most severe tasks — draining marshes and clearing 
ground — "to break their spirits." They are conducted to 
their work by armed guards, who are ordered to fire at 
the least attempt at flight. Hardly any try to escape, 
for they know that if they evade the bullets of the guards 
and their pursuit, it will be necessary to traverse the sea 
and the virgin forest. At every step will lie in wait for 
them death by hunger, by fatigue, by disease, or by the 
poisoned arrows of the natives, who receive a reward for 
every convict they bring back, dead or alive. Meanwhile. 
with bodies broken by their awful toil in a climate 
where a walk of a hundred yards is a formidable 
task, they labor in the blazing sun with spades 
and picks. About their heads hang clouds of 
stinging insects. Great red ants cover their 
bare legs, and sometimes poisonous serpents twist 
about their ankles and inflict mortal wounds. They stand 
in trenches up to their knees in water and mire, and the 
exhalations rising from the earth consume them with fever, 
or set their teeth chattering as with cold, while the sweat 
rolls from their foreheads. Occasionally, in their despair, 
some of the convicts revolt, in the hope, which is seldom 
disappointed, of finding in the bullets of their custodians a 
relief from this living torture. Others, again, go mad, or 
end their lives by deliberately exposing themselves to the 
sun, while very few ever succeed in escaping. Indeed, 
only once have any fugitives reached civilized countries 
again, and even then their period of freedom was compara- 
tively brief. — Public Opinion, London. 

THE gold production of South Africa is so recent, so 
great, and increasing so rapidly as to make it one of the 
most important factors in monetary questions. According 
to the latest information received by the director of the 
mint, the product in 1893 was $28,293,800, while in 1894 it 
rose to $38,954,800, and increase of over ten and a half 
millions. 

The Grand Cafion Line !— To the East ! 



Commencing Nov. 4th the "Santa Fe Route" Popular Overland 
Excursions to Chicago and Eastern Cities will leave every Wednesday. 
Manager in Charge. Through Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleep- 
ers are run to Chicago every day. This is the only Line by which the 
Grand Canon of the Colorado River can be reached. Send for illus- 
trated book giving full particulars. C. H. Speers, A. 6. P. A., 650 
Market street, Chronicle Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



BANKING. 



CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST CO. 

.;. .; .. .. 

Oouren fcfonrooirasii un> CAiftvownji 

OFFICERS J i> Fry. PrralUrnt; llniry WIUUnw, Vloo-Prealdant; J 
Ihil7i'ii llrown. Secretary nnd Tn Marat*. 
Aatborliad by Ikw load Administrator udTnutei 

m Guardltn i I Inoompetenl poraona and minora, as 

i dcpoal- 

lory (or in Mir I and Irnst randt 
A n« -mis to IhQ OOllOOttOD of Intnroat, ili\ t.l.-mls, rent*. etO., fur n-si.l.-nts 

or othora. 

AotoasTruateoof morLfrara of corporations and Individuals, and acoeptfl 
tv ol !i looks. 

Rooelvos deposits Bonjeci to check nnd allows Internal on dally balances. 
Issues certificate* of donosf is boating diced rates "i Interest, ft 
doposlts in its savings department. 

Wilis drawn and taken care «>f n nhoui charge. 

Infnrnuiiiuii and advice regarding trust matters cheerfully Riven. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to ronl al prions from B per at tn upward, 

i • to Blze, and valuables of all kinds are stored al low rates. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital 83,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (October I. 18011.. 3.158,120 70 

WILLIAM ALVORD Presldenl I CHARLES R. BISHOP.. Vicc-Pres't 

ALLEN M.CLAY Secretary THOMAS HKOWN Cashier 

S. Pkentiss Smith. ...Ass'i Cashier 1 1. F. MOCLTON 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremont National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freros; Virginia City (Nov.)— 
Agency of The Bank or California; Chicago— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Australia and New Zealand— Bank of 
New Zealand ; China, Japan, and India— Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute building. 

Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. Paid-Up Capital, $300,000. 

officers 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President. I S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 
Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Moftlt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Granc. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Well, Fargo, & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital Paid-up $3,450,000 

Reserve $500,000 

San Francisco Offlce-424 California St. London Office— 73 Lombard St., E. 
C. Portland Branch — Chamber of Commerce Building, 
Tacoma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER | Ass't Manager. WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAVFRIEDERICH. 
LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— Third National Bank, 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Cob. Sansome asd Suttee Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $3,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $800,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Preres 
& Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers 1 Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENBAUM) „„„„„ 
C. ALTSCHTJL } Managers. 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS, FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

Corner BUSH AND SANSOME ST. 

Steel safes rented from $5 a year upward. Trunks and packages stored 
at reasonable rates. Absolute security for valuables. Prompt and careful 
attention to customers. 

OFFICE HOURS: 8 A. M. to 6 P. M. 

CALIFORNIA TITLE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY. 

Paid-up Capital, $U50,000. Cash Reserve Fund, $35,000. 
L. R. ELLERT. Manager. 
This company loans money on real estate and transacts a general trust 
business. It also makes and continues abstracts of title and issues guar- 
antee policies which protect the holder against loss. 
OFFICE— Mills Building. San Francisco. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President 

ERNST BRAND Secretary 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LRTTER. 



July 6, 1895. 




SWELL-KNOWN Austrian engineer, M. Pfister, is 
stated to have discovered a remarkable property of 
the trunks of trees, namely, that of retaining the salt of sea 
water that has filtered through the trunk in the direction 
of the fibers. He has consequently constructed an ap- 
paratus designed to utilize this property in obtaining 
potable water for the use of ships' crews. This apparatus 
consists of a pump, which sucks up the sea water into a 
reservoir and then forces it into the filter formed by the 
tree trunk. As soon as the pressure reaches 1.5 to 2.5 
atmospheres the water is seen — at the end of from one to 
three minutes, according to the kind of wood used — to 
make its exit from the other extremity of the trunk, at 
first in drops and then in fine streams, the water thus 
filtered being potable, freed, in fact, from every particle 
of the usual saline taste which is such a drawback to water 
obtained in the ordinary manner. 

In spite of his phenomenal success M. Zola is not 

rich. He does not care for wealth, and spends most of 
what he makes by his pen. He has, however, handsome 
apartments in Paris, and a suburban chateau at Medan, 
which is decorated and furnished after the style of the 
Middle Ages. This residence was built wing by wing with 
profits from his novels. M. Zola's greatest ambition is to 
become a member of the French Academy. He has pre- 
sented himself as candidate for the green coat and cocked 
hat a number of times, but has always failed. The author 
of L'Aasomimoir declares that he will present himself at 
each vacancy until he succeeds or until his death, because 
he thinks that as long as there is an academy his work en- 
titles him to be a member. 

A writer who signs herself "An American Girl" 

contributes a short paper to the Arena for June that will 
be likely to arouse a good deal of a hornet's nest about her 
ears. She asks the question, "Shall Our Young Men 
Study in Paris?" and concludes from what she has seen 
and heard in two years of Parisian art study, that the ad- 
vantage of the Paris studios are outweighed by the moral 
temptations of their social atmosphere. She claims that 
the majority of the studios for men in Paris arc hotbeds of 
immorality and vice, and she thinks that most young 
artists would advance more quickly in their art by indus- 
try and perseverance in the comparatively pure atmos- 
phere of the American schools. 

The Memphis Christian Advocate comments in terms 

of great severity upon the practice of raising church debts 
by means of ice-cream festivals, etc. "The most effectual 
way to pay a church debt," it says, "or to meet current 
expenses, is to do it. Let the amount needed be appor- 
tioned among the membership according to the ability of 
each. If any member refuses or declines to do his part, 
let the rest assume it without dispute or contention, 
and pay it, not by suppers or indirect methods, but right 
out. Pay the money without letting it go through an ice- 
cream freezer." 

The three beautiful widows of the late Ismail Pasha 

are residing at the splendid castle of Resina, situated in 
the most picturesque position between Vesuvius and the 
sea. They are the Georgian Princess Schochret, and the 
two Circassian Princesses Djenaniar and Theesmafet. 
They go a good deal about in Naples, having handsome 
carriages at their disposal, and are but little veiled. They 
are like all Eastern women, very fond of shopping and of 
the theatre, never missing a premHre. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 

V. CARUS DRIFFIELD, Manager for the Pacific Coast Branch. 

230 Sansome St., S. P. 

Assets $2,741,873 00 

Liabilities 923,000 00 

Surplus to Policy Holders JI.kins;:: m 

Cash Assets in United States 624,32!) 00 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., AgOTlsCityDePartm %Cali,orniaS«.,S F. 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Fireman's Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY. OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Capital, $1,000,000. 



Assets, $3,000,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OP MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California St., S. F. 
Fire Insurance. Pihe Reinsurance. 

SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, OF LONDON. F0UNDED A - »• I71 °- 

Cash Assets, $10,370,535. Oldest purely fire insurance office in the world. 

THE LION FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD., OF LONDON. 

Established A. D. 1879. Cash Assets, $1,108,095'. 

THE IMPERIAL INSURANCE CO., LTD., OF LONDON. 

Instituted 1803, Cash Assets. $9,362,920. 40 years of business on Pacific 
Coast WM. J. LANDERS, Manager for the Pacific Coast. 

206 Sansome St., near Pine. 



PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT 



WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto $1,642,001.80 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE CO., ° fTor -'° 1,164,196.26 
AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO., »' N ™™' 1,504,714.11 



H. M. GRANT, Manager. 
Office: — 423 California Street. 



C. A. STUART, Ass't Manager. 



THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES, COMBINED, 

BALOIS, of Basle. HELVETIA, of St. Gall. SWITZERLAND, of Zurich. 

Combined Capital $4,000,000. 

These three companies are liable, jointly and severally, for all losses 
that may bo sustained. 

HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 

410 California St., S. F. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up $ 500,000 

Assets 8,747,551 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1 ,654,489 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 401 Montgomery St. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St. 
AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OP AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. Established 1825- 

Capital, $2,250,000. Total Assets, $6,854,653 65 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT: 204 Sansomo St., S. P. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, Established 1752. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. incorporated 1799. 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

413 California St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 
Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 316 California St., S. P. 



J. W. Stevens. 



Frank Sperling. 



SPERLING & STEVENS, 

Executive Specials. 
Bonds, Consols, and Income Investments. 
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Mutual Life Building, 

of New York. California and Sansome Sts. 

A. B. FORBES & SON, General Agents. 



July 6, 1895. 



FRANCISCO Nl'WS 1.1 1 



25 



•>- : - ~r~* 



^w£nnr)a2/s$FM 



Id that in putting together quartered pine or 
any other kind of wood, in fact, greater strength and 
durability can be obtained by placing the grain <>f the mood 
at an angle of 60 degrees, than ran be obtained by crossing 
at 90 degrees, says the Railmiy Rmiae. The reasi 
this is thai a> all •rood expands and contracts more or less 
under the variations of moisture in the atmosphere, the 
pieces glued at an angle of 60 degrees can expand and con- 
tract to a certain extent without tearing themselves apart . 
the case when glued at an angle 01 90 degrees. The 
60 degTee glue joint simply pulls the object outl of place a 
little and disturbs its shape, while the 90 degree glue joint 
pulls things all in pieces in its effort to accommodate 
itself to climatic conditions. 

One of the paradoxes of our quarter of the century. 

as stated by Chauncey Depew, is that every artisan and 

mechanic and the laborer in every department to-day. 
with shorter hours of labor, receives 25 per cent, and in 
many cases B0 per cent, more than he did thirty years ago, 
While he receives thus one-third more than he did thirty 
years ago his dollar will buy in clothes and food twice as 
much as it would thirty years ago. One would think that. 
the laborer ought to be supremely happy when he com- 
pares the past with the present, and that beyond his living 
he ought to be laying up in the savings bank the fund 
which would speedily make him a capitalist. And yet he 
feels a discontent which his father thirty years ago with 
one third the wages and his dollar buying only one half -as 
much, never knew. 

A recently invented lamp-wick of fiiay is sajd to give 

twenty-five per cent, more light than the ordinary cotton 
wicks. The wicks are made capillary by incorporating 
with the clay, while soft, unspun vegetable fiber which ds 
burned out in making. According to The Popular Science 
Xnrs. the inventor has endeavored to provide an inde- 
structible wiek with all the qualities of an ordinary cotton 
wick, but able to burn an indefinite time without renewal 
or trimming. Owing to the perfection of the combustion, 
the flame is white and without odor. The burning out of 
the fiber leaves capillary tubes through which the oil is 
raised to the flame. 

A transparent mirror glass recently introduced in 

Germany reflects light on one side, from which it is practi- 
cally opaque, while from the other side it is transparent. 
It is proposed to use this type of glass for glazing windows 
in city residences, for, while it will not cut off light or 
vision from the interior, it will prevent outsiders from see- 
ing into a room. 

It is stated that Dr. Bertillon, inventor of the famous 

Parisian method of identifying criminals by.exact .measure- 
ment, has discovered a new method for .identifying hand- 
writing by enlarging the letters by photography and 
measuring the alterations due to beating of the pulse. 

An innovation in yachting is now being talked of, 

according to the Murine Record, being; nothing less than 
sails made of compressed paper. The sheets are cemented 
and riveted together in such a way as to form a smooth 
and strong seam. 

THERE is a prospect of an agreement among the heirs 
;to test the validity of the Pair will trust. In case it 
is dealaced illegal, there will be a splendid opportunity for 
the 'lawyers to distribute a handsome portion of that forty 
millions among themselves. There may be some public 
benefit derived from that immense estate yet. It is a 
tempting morsel for the legal profession. 

" El Monte " Hotel, Sausalito, is now open for the summer sea- 
son, at prices to suit the times. Hot and cold salt water baths are 
connected with the hotel. 



SOMEWHERE TO DINE. 



( hildren cutting teeth, and suffering from the various disorders 
incident thereto, need Steedman's Soothing Powders. 



Large Demand. Pioneer Brand Desiccated and Shredded Cccoauut is 
now wanted everywhere. The demand is larger than can be tilled. 



wi 






tttut. 

. .! mark It 

When tin. boat i- el hand. 

Sulla ns and ri ■ California Marfeet- 

'..iii. i ij strr Stand. 

look far for ins reason 
Whj ihe patronage paye In thi 

l-'ur lln-y nerve all Iho v'iwmI linn 

And tho dollcate, Miooulont oyBter 

is over in greatest demand 
in Hun pleaaant, ootrrnnlent cloister 

nforagban's OyBter Stand. 

" Caltrornlana " or " Easterns," they all are 
Put up in the dalnt lest i\ te. 

Ami It'fi MTV urll spriil Is II ilnlllir 

iii sampling those bivalves a while; 
For the epicure ne'or nmis an oyBter 

In any lay nut in the Ituul 

Tiuit tempts iiiin to revel anil royster 
Like Moraghao'a Oyster stand. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Challenge Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco. Cal. Location of 
works— Gold Hill. Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 11th day of Juue, 1895, ao assessment (No. nit of Five Cents (5c.) 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the olllee of the 
company, room 35. Mills Building, northeast comer of Montgomery and 
Bush streets, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
16TH DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on TUESDAY, the 6th day of August, 
1895, to pay the delinquent assessment,' together With the costs of advertis- 
ing and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

C. L: McCOY, Secretary. 

Office — Rooms No. 35, third floor Mills Building, northeast corner Mont- 
gomery and Bush streets. San Francisco, Cat- 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works — Storey county, Neyada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a tnoeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the twelfth day of June, 1895. an assessment, No. 58, of 25 cents per 
.share, was levied on the capital stock or the corporation, payable im- 
mediateiy in United Stales gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
.company, room 33, Ne.vada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
18th DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction and unless 
payment is made before wilibe sold on Thursday, the 8th day of August, 
1895, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses qf sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

M. JAFFE. Secretary. 

Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
Ca liforni a. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Bullion Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 12th day of June, 1895, an assessment (No. 45) of 10c. per share, was 
levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately in 
United States guld coin to the Secretary, at the office of the company, room 
21. 331 Pine street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
17TH DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
will be delinquent, and advertised fur sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on WEDNEDAY, the 7th day of August, 
1895, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. R. GRAYSON. Secretary. 

Office— Room 2D, 331 Pine street, S, F.,Cal, 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 19 

Amount per Share 10 cents 

Levied June 25, 1895 

Delinquent in Office July 30, 1895 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 21, 1895 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Curr/ Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 76 

Amount per Share ■ 15 cents 

Levied July 2, 1895 

Delinquent in Office August 6, 1895 

Davof Sale of Delinquent Stock August 28, 1895 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco. Cal. 

nD RirTlRD'C; RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genn- 
Ur\. nlWnu O i ue — A specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the' medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States 
J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco! 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, $1 25; of 100 pills, »2; of 200 pills, 
$3 50; of 400 pills, $6; Preparatory Pills, $2. Send for circular. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 6, 1895. 



THIS has been a decidedly off week in society circles, for 
the majority of its members have gone out of town to 
spend the national holiday. But though one. could readily 
detect the absence of familiar faces upon our promenades, 
the streets have been well filled with visiting strangers. 
mostly people from the country come hither to spend the 
glorious Fourth and take in all the sights of city life, which 
this year have been unusually attractive, extra prepara- 
tions having been made for the celebration of the nation's 
birthday. 

Those indefatigable entertainers, Mesdames Peter Dona- 
hue and Eleanor Martin, have again distinguished them- 
selves in giving one of their handsome dinners in honor of 
Father Varsi, who was chief guest. The table was daintily 
set and ornamented florally, and the mam, as usual, was 
unexceptional. Miss Susan B. Anthony and Miss Anna 
H. Shaw have also been mildly fSted, Mrs. Cooper's tea 
and Mrs. Blinn's luncheon having been two of the gastro- 
nomic events of recent date. Otherwise, the week has 
been a particularly dull one, the motif for many of the re- 
rent luncheons and teas, Mrs. Field and her sister, Mrs. 
Smith, having betaken themselves to Del Monte, leaving 
an aching void behind them. However, there is the pros- 
pect ahead of some lionizing being done, for the Secretary 
of War and his party, that is, if any of our hostesses will 
admit that they are in the city and not enjoying the dust 
and heat of the interior resorts. 



The pretty bride, Mrs. Norman Lang, rile McKee, was 
the motif for several gatherings of recent date in Oakland, 
the scarlet luncheon, at which Miss Nellie Chabot presided 
as hostess, and the sweet pea dinner of Mrs. George Mc- 
Near's, being especially notable for their elegance. Miss 
Carrie Nicholson's luncheon had four brides among the 
guests, and was a pleasant affair. 

Life at our gay watering places should now be in full 
swing, Fourth of July week having of late years been the 
date set by fashion for its commencement, but as yet we 
do not hear of anything at the majority of them that can 
be considered festivity. San Rafael has had a crowd 
11I guests this week to witness the tennis tournament, 
which, though not so much talked of as of yore, proved a 
great attraction when the time arrived, and the tennis 
ball on Thursday evening was largely attended and much 
enjoyed. All the residents of both San Rafael and Ross 
Valley have had parties of friends stopping with them, 
luncheons, dinners, and driving parties taking place daily. 
The arrival of the von Schroeders has been hailed with de- 
light, and the Baron has already been largely in evidence 
with the ribbons in his hands. To-day there will be an 
amateur theatrical performance for the benefit of the 
King's Daughters, when My Turn Next will be given, be- 
sides a number of pretty tableaux, some of our prettiest 
maidens bring among the participants. Miss Jennie Blair 
has been one of Mrs. Newhall's guests, and Miss Hobart 
has been staying with Mrs. George Boyd. The Winslows 
and Oxnards are domiciled with Mr. Stetson pere in Ross 
Valley, Mr. and Mrs. Avery McCarthy are among those 
visiting the Marcus Gerstles. 



_ Luncheons are the favorite form of entertaining at Bur- 
lingame, and scarcely a day passes without one or more 
taking place at the club house or the pretty villa homes 
thereabout. The Will Crocker's new villa is now ready 
for occupancy, and the Coleman's villa is going forward 
with rapid strides. Mrs. Richard Sprague will soon be 
among the missing, and she will be a very decided loss if it 
be true that she and Mr. Sprague are anticipating a 

lengthy absence abroad. Talbot Clifton and Harry Simp- 
kins are off for a visit, to Alaska. Polo will, it is said, be a 
prominent feature on Saturdays and Sundays hereafter 

during the summer. 

The latest in Fashionable Note Paper, "Florentine Mosaic." at Cooper's. 



Mrs. Newhall and her two step-sons, George and W.alter, 
are occupying the Louis Parrott cottage at San Rafael 
and making life pleasant for a number .of their friends. 
Mrs. James Cuningham and family are visiting Lake 
Tahoe. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Moore and the Hall 
McAllisters are among the cottagers at Blythedale. Mrs. 
Joe Austin has accompanied her brother, W. T. Sesnon, to 
Yosemite. Lieutenant Strother and Lieutenant Faison 
have exchanged quarters, Strother going to Benicia and 
Faison is at his old camping ground, Angel Island. Mrs. 
Fred Low and Miss Flora reached New York last Sunday, 
en route to Europe. 

Del Monte also had a large arrival of guests for the 
Fourth, and between concert music, dancing, driving 
parties, tank parties, fireworks, etc., there has been en- 
joyment ml HI', for all who there congregated. Mrs. 
Schmieden and Mrs. George Howard are among those who 
will remain the rest of the season at Del Monte. The 
majority of the Four Hundred at present at San Rafael 
will come bodily to Del Monte in the course of another 
week, and from then on till after the shoot takes place 
there will be little room to spare. 

At Santa Cruz salmon fishing has been the fad, and some 
wonderful catches have been reported. The Phelans are 
entertaining friends at Phelan Park this week, and the 
other cottagers are not behind hand in that respect. The 
presence of the yachts hi the bay has made it very lively, 
and the little village is full to overflowing. 



The yacht Lurline has carried John D. Spreckels with a 
select number of guests down the coast, the party expect- 
ing to spend some time atCoronado, where Mrs. Spreckels 
and family are passing the summer months. The H. H. 
Sherwoods are spending the summer at Belvedere, where 
they are occupying the Rix cottage. Mrs. S. B. Living- 
stone, of New York, nfe Rich, who is spending the season 
with her relatives in San Francisco, will be "at home" on 
Wednesdays at 1(18 Oak street. 

We may soon expect to hear of a wedding in Honolulu 
which will be of interest hereabouts. The steamer Monowai 
carried away the groom-elect, Joseph Cooke, of Oakland, 
who will on the 18th of July wed Miss Maud Baldwin, who 
for many years has resided in the Hawaiian Islands. Mr. 
Cooke was accompanied by several members of his family, 
who will '"assist" in the bridal festivities. 



Our young society will no doubt greatly regret the loss 
of Lieutenant Strother, who has been one of its most pop- 
ular beaux for several years past. He has been ordered 
to Chicago as Aid on General Merritt's staff. 



The Fields and Condit Smiths will soon be at Del Monte; 
for a stay of some duration; the Charley Keeneys and the 
Blankmans, who are at present at Santa Monica, will 
spend August at Del Monte; so also will Mrs. Southard 
Hoffmann and daughters, W. F. Goad and daughters, etc. 

Professor Adelstein has returned from his trip around 
the world, and expresses much pleasure at being again in 
San Francisco. 

Dr. and Mrs. Clyde S. Payne, of Sutter street, are 
spending the summer at Mackinac Islands, Northern 
Michigan. 

Mr. Ashton P. Stevens leaves to-day for a short vacation 
at Cazadero. 

THE Wenban building, corner of Sutter and Mason 
streets, will be completed August 15th. There are a 
few of the office rooms still '.eft in this elegant building, 
suitable for professional men. Easton & Eldridge, who are 
the agents, will have one of their own men continually in 
the building to oversee the employees and see every detail 
carried out that will insure the building being kept first- 
class in all respects. 

The trip to Haywards Park is a delightful one, and every Sunday 
afternoon it is crowded with people from this city who go there for 
recreation. Regular Sunday concerts, music and dancing at the 
Club House is enjoyed by visitors. The Club House furnishes ex- 
cellent refreshments. The Oakland, San Leandro and Haywards 
Electric Railway runs direct to the Park, and the scenery is beauti- 
ful, with shade trees and gardens on every hand. 



July 6, 1895. 



>.\N FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE WEARY SINGER. 

THK .Ireani l* ilnne. Thr »nmc M»fl fragranre h< 
•it the hill* where wr were wont to stray 
In those gU.I days when she and I were lovers, 
Hefore »he went away. 

Where'er 1 look, I see the sweet fared flowers 
That grace the rujqrad riopm ahofc the sea . 

Th.y smile while yrt the sunbeams light the hours 
As she once smiled on me. 

The strong old winds their bolstorona hymnsare singing. 

The songbirds carol gayly in the trees; 
l"pon the rocks each wave ils spray is flinging— 

Nunc mlfla her, none of these. 

Were I as wise, I, loo, wouhi cen>e repining 

For that one face I ne'er can see again ; 
But all seems dark ; the sun no more is shining, 

* \l shines on me in vain. 

Ami as my way each weary day I follow 

Across the fields or on the noisy street, 
The sounds of life are indistinct and hollow. 

And all seems incomplete. 
The sights I loved— the little children playing 

In quiet fields; the lovers, twain yet one; 
The while-haired wife, 'twist earlh and heaven straying. 

Ah, well, the dream is done. 
And though I mourn, the one my heart desires 

Will find true peace in her allotted tasks ; 
To watch the sick and quench their fevered fires, 

.For love's sweet sake, she asks. 
Her gentle step will tread the dreary city, 

Her tender smile will ease the dying's care; 
And men shall think, when she moves near in pity, 

God's dearest angel there. 
My dream is done. I weave the threads, all broken, 

In this poor song to sing throughout the night ; 
I see the Cross — the everlasting token — 

And thus await the light. 
Ban Francisco, July 6, 1895. Howard V. Sutherland. 



OBITUARY. 

JH. WIDBER, City and County Treasurer of SanPran- 
i cisco, died very suddenly of pleura-pneumonia at his 
residence, 737 Ellis street, on Tuesday night last. Mr. 
Widber was one of the pioneers of -19, and belonged to the 
Society of California Pioneers. He was a man universally 
respected and has served the people in an official capacity 
as a member of the Board of Education, and was filling his 
third term as Treasurer of San Francisco. He was a 
native of Maine, where he learned the drug business, and 
was successfully engaged in that business in this city up to 
the time of his death. He was an enterprising citizen 
whose integrity could not be called in question, and he had 
the confidence of his fellow-citizens to a remarkable degree. 
He leaves a widow and two sons, the latter grown to man- 
hood and engaged in business, one being his deputy in the 
office of County Treasurer. At a meeting of the Board of 
Supervisors on Wednesday his son, August Widber, who has 
been his faithful deputy, was chosen as his successor to fill 
out the term. 

« STREET-CAR cable seven miles long has been made 
in this city for the Presidio and Perries line. San 
Francisco is fast developing superior manufacturing 
facilities. The reduction of duty on coal, as has been 
shown, has greatly benefited our manufacturing industries 
and the entire abolition of the duty will be a further aid to 
progress. 

The expensive and elaborate work necessary for the erection of 
the building and procuring a supply of fresh sea water daily for the 
Lurline Baths has been highly appreciated by the citizens of San 
Francisco. Here they can be accommodated with hot and cold salt 
water at any time in the day and enjoy a tub bath or a swim with- 
out going to the beach. Entertainments are given every Tuesday 
and Friday evening. The baths are situated on the corner of Bush 
and Larkin streets, in the very heart of the city. 

Those who want a fine quality of liquor for medicinal purposes or 
for home use will find the Jesse Moore AA whisky superior to any 
other brand. Sold by all druggists and the principal saloons. 

Bibles, Prayer Books and Hymnals in Stationery department, 
Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 




Max Abraham, 

Caterer. 



SAL \l' 

ill slmrl DOl loo W ■ 

nor*. Private Picnics, ■ to., .»i 
tended lo. 



428 Goru St. 



Telephone I 



Furnished House for Sale. 



Iflccni murine riew, One garden, large yard; 45x120 
reel; well furnished; * rooms and bath; bllUard table; 

modern iTiipnivrniruts; enliven i en 1 In I \vc..i cable lines; 

For further particulars see owner at 



606 MERCHANT ST. 



GEORGE FAIR, 



LATE ACCOUNTANT IN THE GRANGERS' BANK 
OF CALIFORNIA. 

Auditing and exporting books of corporations, banks, and 
mercantile firms attended to. office: Merchants' Ex- 
change Building, California St.. Room 27. 
Advertiser is a member of the Sun Francisco Produce Ex- 
change and Call Hoard Association. Correspondence with 
grain ware housemen and country merchants solicited. 



NEW LOUVRE; 



8-14 O'FARRELL ST. 



We have removed the " Louvre " from the old basement un- 
der the Phclan Building, and now occupy the finest quar- 
ters above ground iu the city. 
RUDOLPH HAGEN. FELIX EISELE, Proprietors. 



Pacific Towel Gompanu. 



No. 9 



Lick Place 



Furnishes clean Towels at the following low rates: Clean hand 
towels each week, $1 per month; 12 clean hand towels each week; 
$1 50 per month; 4 clean roller towels each week, $1, 6 months, 
6 clean roller towels each week, SI 25 per month. 



Neglected 



FHuratinn An el(lerI y .gentleman will attend to "read up" with 
Luuwiiuiii anyone requiring his services, by the day or hour; or as 
tutor in a private family, town or country. SENEX, 93 Flood Bl'd'g, S. F 

ANNUAL MEETING- 

Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Union Consoli- 
dated Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 
room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal., on 

MONDAY, the 15TH DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the election of a Board of Directors to serve 
for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other business as may 
come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Thursday, July 11, 
1895, at 3 o'clock p. m. A. P. SWAIN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 4. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Savage Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Savage Mining 

Company will be held at the office of the company, room 50, Nevada Block, 

No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on THURSDAY, the 

18TH DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m. , for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
to serve for the ensuing year, and for the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Monday. 
July 15th, at 3 o'clock p.m. E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Merrimac Mining and Milling Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Merrimac Mining 
and Milling Company will be held at the office of the company, room 
23, Nevada block, San Francisco, Cal., on 

MONDAY, the EIGHTH (8th) DAY OF JULY, 1895, 

at the hour of 12 o'clock m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other business as 
may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Saturday, 
July 6, 1895, at the hour of 13 o'clock m. AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, S. F., Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Best & Belcher 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 33, Nevada 
Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal., on 

MONDAY, THE EIGHTH (8th) DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Wed- 
nesday, July third (3), at 3 o'clock P. M. M. JAFFE, Secretary. 

Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Moatgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR. 



July 6, 1895- 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

(Pacific System.) 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

Leave. \ From -Inn, li, 1895. I Arrive 

*6:30 A Sao Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 9:15 A 

7:00 a AtlantloExpress.Ogdenand Bast io:50p 

7:00 a Beniola, Vaeaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, and Redding, via Davis 7:15 p 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Napa. Cal- 
ls toga, and *8antaRosa 6:15p 

7:30 a San Leaudro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 10:I5A 

8:30a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Red 

Blurf, and Oroville 4 :15 P 

*8:30 A Peters and Milton *7:15p 

9:00 a San Leandro Haywards and Way 

Stations 1 1 :45 A 

3:00 a New Orleans Express, Raymond, 
(for Yosemite), Santa Barbara, 
Dos Angeles, Deming, El Paso, 
New Orleans and East 5:45F 

{1:00 a Martinez and Stockton 10:45 A 

10:00a San Leandro, Haywards, Niles... I:45P 
18:00m San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 3:45 P 

1:00 p Niles, San Jose and Livermore. . . B:45A 

*l:0OP Sacramento River steamers *9:00p 

4/1:30 p Port Costa and Way Stations — t7:45p 

3:00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 5 :45 P 

4:'i0 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 6:45 P 

4:00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Vurano and 
Santa Rosa 0:15a 

4:00 P Beuicia, Vaeaville, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, Marysville, 
Oroville, and Sacramento 10:45a 

4:30 P Niles, San Jose, Livermore and 

Stockton 7 :15 p 

5:00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 8:45 P 

5:30 p Los Angeles Express, Fresno. 
Raymond (for Yosemite), Bakers- 
Beld, Santa Barhara, Los Aiij*rles 10:45 A 

5:30 P Santa Fe Route, A thin l if Express, 

for Mojave aud East Mi: 15 a 

8:00 p European mail, Ogden and Easl 0:45 a 

tt:0Up Haywards, Niles and San .lost;-.. 7 : 15 A 

(7:00 p Valleio t7:45p 

7:00 p Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, l 'or Maud, 

Pugel Sound and East 10:45 A 

7:00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 10:50p 

8:00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

StattonB ttl2:00 a 

f|ii:i5p San Leandro, Haywards aud 

Wa y Stations *7 : 15 A 

Santa Citu/. Division iNarn* w Gauge). 
t7:45A Sunday excursion for Newark, San 
Jose, Los Gatos, Feltou, Santa 

Cruz 18:05 P 

8:15A Newark, Ceuterville, San Jose, 
Felton, BoulderCreek, Santa Cruz 

and way stations 5:50 P 

*2:15p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
New Almaden, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 

way stations *11:20A 

4:45 P Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos 9:50 A 

Coast Division ( Third and Towusend streets). 
♦6:45 A San Jose, New Almaden and way 

stations *1:45 p 

J7:30 A Sunday Excursion for San Jose, 
Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, and 

priucipal way stations 18:35 P 

8:15A San .lose, Tres Piuos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
Luis Obispo and principal way 

stations 7:05 P 

J9:47 A Palo Alio and way stations (1:45 P 

in: to a San Jose and way stations 5:00 p 

II ; ir. v Palo AltO and way si at ions 3:30 P 

*2:30pSau Jose., Gilroy, Tres Piuos, 
Santa Cm/,, Salinas, Monterey, 
Paclflo Grove '. .*10:40a 

♦3:30 p San Jose and principal way sta- 
tions ' 9:47 A 

*4:30f San Jose and Way Stations *8:06 A 

5:90 (' San Jose and way stations *8:48 A 

6:311 p San .lose and way stations 6:35 A 

tll:45pSau Jose, aud waystations ft'AQF 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From San Fit anhisco— Foot of Marketstrcct 
(Slip 8). 

*7:00, 8:00, 0:00. *10:00and 11:00 a. m., *l:>:30 
(1:00, *S:00, 8:00, f4:00,5:00 and *6:00 p. m. 
From OAKLAND— Foot of Broadway. 

*6:00, *7:00. 8:00, *9:00, 10:00 and *H:Ooa m 
112:00, *13:80. 2:00, *3:00, 4:00 aud *5:00p. m, 

a for Morning. p for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. fSaturdays only. 

({Thursdays only. JSundays only. 

tt Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will eall for 
and check baggage from hotels and residences. 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 



WISE AND OTHERWISE. 

No wise man ever wished to be younger.— 
Swift. 
The greatest medicine is a true friend.— 

Sir W. Temple. 

Fortune gives too much to many, but lo 
none enough. — Martial. 

Between two evils choose neither; between 
two goods, choose both.— Tryon Ktli<<rtrds. 

Clap an extinguisher upon your irony, if 
you are unhappily blessed with a vein of it. 
— Lamb. 

He that has never known adversity is but 
half acquainted with himself or others. — 
Collon. 

There are no rules for friendship. It must 
be left to itself; we cannot force it any more 
than love.— Hazlitt. 

The passion of acquiring riches in order to 
support a vain expense corrupts the purest 
souls.— Fmclon. 

It is difficult to believe that a true gentle- 
man will ever become a gamester, a libertine 
or a sot. — Chapin. 

It is meet that noble minds keep ever with 
their likes; for who so firm cannot be se- 
duced. — Shakttpeare. 

Wise kings have generally wise council- 
lors, as— he must be a wise man himself who 
is capable of distinguishing one.— Diogene.a. 

If you have great talents, industry wi I 
improve them ; if m<> lerate abilities, indus- 
try will supply their deficiencies. Nothing 
is denied to well directed labjr; nothing is 
ever to be attained without it.— Sir J '. Rey- 
nolds. 



Oakland, San Leandro & Hauwards 
tleGtriG Railway. 

Connects with the broad gauge local at Fruit- 
vale every hall b ■ for San Leandro, San 

Lorenzo, and Haywards. 

Classic and popular music every Sunday from 11 
A. M. to 5 r. m. at Haywards Park. 

The Club-house cuisine excellent. 

ft. BUSWELL, 

BooUbinder, Paper-Ruler, Printc 
and BlanU Book Manufacturer. 
516 Commercial St., S. F. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 A. m., July 5, 9, 19, 24; August 
3,8. 18; September 2 17. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound ports, July 5, 9, 14, 
19, 24, 29, and every 5th day thereafter. 

Fur Eureka. Areata, and Field's Landing 
(Humholdt Bay), Steamer "Pomona, "every Tues- 
day a! > p. M. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
July 4,8, 12, Hi. 80, 21, 28, and every fourth day 
thereafter at 8 A. m. 

For San Diego, slopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Purl Los Angeles, Kedondo, (Los 

Angeles), ami Newport, July 2, 8, in, i i, ih, 22, 88, 

30. and every fourth day thereafter, at 1 1 A. m. 

Steamer " Pomona,*' Saturday to Monday ex- 
cursion t<> Santa Cruz and Monterey, leaves 
Broadway Wharf 1, Saturday, 4 p. M. 

For Ensenada, San Jose del Cabo, Mazatian, 

La. ['a/, Altata.and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer 
"Willamette Valley,* 1 10 A.M.,25th of each mouth. 
TICKET OFFICE— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery sine I. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO.. Geu'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street. San Francisco. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

For .Japan and China. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST AND BRAN- 
NAN STREETS.jal :i p m, for Yokohama and 
HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
steamers for SHANGHAI. 

COPTIC (via Honolulu).. Wednesday, July 8, 1895 

Gaelic Tuesday, July S3, isos 

Bhlgic ... Saturday, AugusiS4,iS95 

Coptic (via Honolulu).. Thursday, Sept. IS, 1895 

Round Tkip Tickets at Reduced Hates. 
For freight or passage apply at Company's 
office, No. 425 Market street, corner First. 

D. D. STUBBS, Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

TmuRoN Fkkry— Foot of Market Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:40, 9:30, 11:00 A m; 13:35,3:30 
5:10, 5:30 p U. Thursdays— Extra trip at 
11:80 i' m Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 
aud it:;*) p m. 

SUNDAYS— 8:00, 0:30, 11:00 A m; 1:30. 3:30, 5:00, 
fi :20 PM. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:25, 7:55, 9:30, 11:10 A m; 13:45, 
8:40, 5:10 P H. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :S5 
and 6:35 P M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 0:40, 11:10 am; 1:40,3:40,5:00, 
6:35 pm. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 
same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. | In Effect 


Arrive in S. F. 


5L e ys k »»»*>»■■ dksti'tion. 

7:40AM 8:00AM | Novulo. 
3:30PM 9:30am Petuluma, 

5:10 pm. 5:00pm ' Santa Rosa. 


Sundays. 

10:40 am 
11:05 p M 
7 :30 p M 


Week 
Days. 

8:50AM 
10:30AM 
6: 15PM 






Fulton, 
Windsor, 

Hcaldsburg, 
GeyserviUe, 
Cloverdale. 




















3:30 pm 


8:00AM 


7 :30 p M 


11:1 5PM 



7:40 AMI 
3:30 PM 



Pieta. Hop- I 
land, Ukiah.l 



1 10:30 AM 

I 6:15PM 



7:40a Ml 
3:30PM| 



8:00am Ouerucville 7:30pm 



|l(i:4DAM 
|6:05pm 



7:40AM| 8:00AM 
5:111PM 5:00 pm 



Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 



10:40 am 18:50 am 
6:05pm |6:15pm 



7:lil A Hi 8:00A J 

3::*)pm| 5:O0ps 



Sehastopol, 



|10:40am 110 30am 
I 6:05pm 8:15 pm 



Stages connect at San Rafael for Bolinas. 

Stages connect at GeyserviUe for Skaggs 
Springs. 

Stages oonneol al Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Staffs i'niiiiir.1 al I'ict a fur Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville, Soda Bay, and Lakeport, 

Stages connect at Hopland for Lakeport and 
Bartlett Springs. 

Slaves connect at Ukiah for Vichy Spriugs, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Upper Lake, 
Mooneville, Greenwood, Orr's Hoi Springs, Men- 
docino City, Fori Bragg, Usal, Westport, Lay- 
tonville, willitts, Capefia, Porno, Potter Valley, 

John Day's, Llerley'S, Gravelly valley, Harris, 
Blooksburg, Brldgevllle, Hydesville, and Eureka 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rales. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at 1. vlf rates 

TICKET OFFICE— Corner New Montgomery 
and Market streets, under Palace Hotel. 



H. C. WHITING, 
Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN, 
Gen. Passenger Agent. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. 

SAILINGS— AT NOON. 
From Company's wharf, First and Brannan Sts. 
S. S. "Acapulco." July 8, 1895. 
S. S. "City of Sydney," July 1H, 1895. 
S. S. '-San Bias," July 29, 1895. 
S.S. "San Juan," August B, 1895. 
Japan and China Line for Yokohama and 
Hongkong. 
Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 
Shanghai, and at Hongloong for 
India, etc. 
SAILINGS AT 3 p. M. 
S. S, "China," June L (895. 
s. s. "Peru/ June 84, 1895. 
s, s, "City of Rlode Janeiro,' 1 July 18, 1895. 
S. S. "City hi Peking," via Honolulu, August 3. 
Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freighl or passage apply at tho Company's 
office, No. 425 Market street. 

ALEXANDER CENTER. 

General Agent. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Coolgardie gold-Held s. 
(Freemantle) Australia, 

$230 tirsi class, W10 steer- 
age. Lowest rail's to Cape- 
town, S. Africa. 
O. S. S. Co.'s steamers 

' 'For HONOLULU, S. S. 

"AUSTRALIA, " 
July Bth, at 10 A.M. 
For HONOLULU, APIA, 
AUCKLAND, and SYD- 
NEY, S. S. ALAMEDA, 
July 25th, at 2 P. M. 
For passage apply to 138 Montgomery street. 
For freight apply to 827 Market street. 
J. D. SP RECKELS & BROS. CO., General Agts. 







Aummal Smbteriptum, ti.OO. 




Net| si, HTER 




KoJ. Z/. 



iUtf FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1895. 



Number 2. 



frimlmtmtl rOHrtnf >»n > "nf»i if.i» fn WBBtt VAK 

#«-«w»-*j. ' Fraiuiteo. 

PoslnJKrr an - Mnlt'r. 

The of tWS LBTT8R I v. i For* W/» ''* •" '>'■ 

■ ... ^noM I. »rV/v iitt'.trmiitioii may 
: >i'tr/rti*tttij I 

HENRY Mayer's minority report from the Grand Jury 
came a little late, but as an example of absolutely 
impartial taffy it is clearly entitled to the bun. 



SN irreverent depreciator of San Francisco architec- 
ture says that the prevalent style of wooden -house — a 
dry goods Ixix with big bay windows fastened on — reminds 
him of a large breeding cage. 



THERE seems to be a disposition to cast slurs on a 
1 steeple-climber who has left his creditors in the 
lurch at Stockton. The people there did not think he 
would have come down so low. 



THERE can be no objection to the placing of a revolv- 
ing statue of Diogenes with his lantern on the dome 
of the New City Hall providing the features of the old 
Greek crank philosopher are carefully modelled from a 
bust of the present chief executive of this city. 

THE report of Chief Engineer Sullivan, of the Fire De- 
partment, shows the urgent necessity of more 
hydrants. The needed facilities should be supplied at once. 
The safety of the c'ty is at stake, and the Supervisors have 
a grave responsibility on their hands. 

WHERE are the fireworks which did not work on the 
Fourth of July ? It will be of interest to see whether 
the Committee pays for them or not. Presumably the 
whole matter will end in smoke — that is, all except the 
fireworks which ought to have ended in smoke and did not. 



THE Bulletin is authority for the statement that ladies 
will in future wear corsets while bathing. We are 
glad to hear it, as ladies of late years don't seem to have 
been wearing anything at all in particular during their dip 
in the ocean, and the step is at least in the right direction. 

THAT was a very sad story of Denis Kearney's that 
the Call published last Sunday, "Astride a Frozen 
Anchor in a Gale. " The readers could not help thinking 
what an opportunity was missed when the crew of the res- 
cuing craft failed to let that anchor go, instead of hauling 
Denis on board. 

EVERY week or two the gratified reader of the daily. 
paper stumbles across fubulous stories of petroleum 
finds and coal veins and as this has been going on for 
several years without any appreciable millionaires being 
added to our ranks, it is getting about time to imagine 
that there is considerable gas about the petroleum and 
that the coal discoveries have been located by the seven 
lost tribes. 

THE Healdsburg woman who left $5 to her husband, out 
of an estate of $10,000, thereby signified a poor opinion 
of her spouse. But her piety was manifested in various 
bequests to churches, which amounted to upwards of $800. 
It is rather a curious sort of religion that disposes of 
worldly goods in this fashion, particularly as the woman's 
husband is an old man and had deeded to her all Ms prop- 
erty at the time of their marriage. 



ASSURANCES om Healdsburg thai the crop of 

rattlesnakes is uncommonly large in the mountains 

north of that place, I me oi the oldest residents, who look 

a jug of whisky to his ranch for antidotal purposes, was 
greatly surprised a few days afterwards to find it full of 
snakes. 



MA. YOB Sutro lias displayed his customary thrift in 
drawing out the two-and-a half gold-pieces from the 
City Treasury. He gave other coins in exchange at par 
value. The two-and-a-half gold-pieces are now scarce, 
and command a premium of about thirty cents each among 
collectors of coins. 



FA. HYDE, ex-President of the School Board, has 
, again declared himself in favor of cutting the salaries 
of the substitute teachers. He has also put himself on 
record against granting leave of absence. The opinion of 
the teachers concerning Mr. Hyde was pretty well mani- 
fested when that gentleman was retired from service on 
the Board. 

IT is said that a number of Englishmen, disposed to buy 
land and settle in California, have been deterred from 
coming to the State by fear of the passage of laws against 
alien ownership of land. There is no danger, however, 
that the rights of any resident alien can be injured. There 
is a Constitutional guarantee to the contrary. No one can 
be disturbed by the passage of laws subsequent to his pur- 
chase of land in California. 

NEWSPAPER headlines announce that the Kiel Canal 
is a "failure." But there seems to be no warrant, in 
fact, for such a statement. It appears that the new 
waterway needs to be deepened in order to prevent the 
grounding of the largest war vessels, but that is a thing 
easily accomplished. The Suez Canal gave much trouble 
after it was first opened, but dredging soon corrected the 
tendency of the channel to fill up. 

S WHISKEY laden politician went gunning for Governor 
Budd in this city the other evening, but was arrested 
before he had a chance to do mischief. The man's grievance 
was that he had been disappointed of an appointment to 
office. If all the people who have experienced a like dis- 
appointment at the hands of the Governor should follow 
the example of this person, something like an armed insur- 
rection would soon be in progress. 

NOW that the rails have arrived for the San Joaquin 
Valley road, the prospect of its early construction 
may be said to have crystallized into certainty. And it is 
pleasing to note that there is a revival of the project for a 
railroad up the coast to penetrate the timber belts and in- 
terior valleys of Sonoma, Mendocino, and Humboldt Coun- 
ties. There are extensive coal deposits in the region which 
this road will open up, and by means of the new line a large 
supply of cheap fuel may be brought to this city. The 
coal is of the lignite sort, and excellent of its class. 



THE shippers who sent California fruit to London a few 
days ago knew what they were about. They were 
not taking a hop in the dark, for it now appears that they 
were aware that the fruit crop in Europe promises to be 
this year a dismal failure. This fact has been established 
on the authority of reports from Covent G-arden market. 
London, and those reports prove that the fruit crop in 
Europe will be so small as to amount in some places almost 
to a famine. It looks indeed as if California was intended 
by nature to supply the deficiencies of other lands. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895. 



RETIRE DR. D1LLE. 

THE objects for which the Civic Federation exists — the 
cleansing of politics and the bettering of public mor- 
ality in San Francisco — are such as to interest the 
sympathy of all reputable citizens. Indeed, these objects 
are of such consequence to every good man that those who 
conspicuously devote themselves to their advancement are, 
and should be, jealously watched, lest they harm and not 
help the cause. Something more than zeal is needed to 
make a reformer. Unless enthusiasm be tempered by 
discretion and guided by good sense, the reformer becomes 
a nuisance, and an extremely hurtful one at that. To per- 
mit a man who is deficient either in intelligence or honesty 
to take the lead of a movement is to discredit it and give 
aid and comfort to the enemy. That is the danger which 
the Civic Federation is inviting by allowing the Rev. Dr. 
Dille to gratify his hunger for conspicuousness at its ex- 
pense — and the expense of San Francisco likewise, which 
is of more importance. Dr. Dille is an exceedingly fluent 
gentleman, with a weakness for making phrases, and 
doubtless deserves the prominence which he enjoys among 
the clergy of his sect, but he is hardly of the order of mind 
which inspires respect among modern men, or that fits 
him for leadership in secular affairs. A few evenings ago, 
in the Metropolitan Temple, for example, he lectured on 
the Camera Club's photographs. The following extract is 
taken from the Ehmniner « report : 

Speaking of Washington's victories Dr. Dille held that the prayers 
of the great General made the American victories possible. After 
this statement a colored picture of Washington was shown, kneeling 
in prayer by a tree at Valley Forge. " Here is the Father of his 
country," said the speaker, " imploring God to aid the just cause of 
the colonies. God did not neglect the appeal, and that teaches us 
that the weak colonies could not have succeeded without the aid of 
prayer." 

Perhaps Dr. Dille believes that. If he does, he should 
not leave the comforting calm and dusk of his pulpit to 
emerge into the light and bustle of nineteenth century 
life. If he does not believe it, why did he say it ? We know 
there are clergymen whose views of the government of the 
universe have been affected by the discoveries of science, 
who know that law reigns, and who yet affect to hold to 
the old belief that everything is subject to sudden, arbi- 
trary, and capricious intervention from Heaven, which was 
formerly on the other side of the sky, four miles up. They 
talk, as Dr. Dille talks, with a cool front to audiences 
which they are aware do not believe this, and which know 
that the clergymen do not believe it themselves. These 
pretenders to faith in a theory of the world that has be- 
come preposterous to the intelligent are bullies. They 
speak not for themselves but for a mass of pious ignorance 
behind them, on which they feel they can rely to shout 
down and punish dissent or contradiction. They count on 
the cowardice of mankind to protect them. If," their 
attitude says, " you deny what you and I know to be un- 
true, but what I nevertheless assert, you will offend re- 
spectable prejudice ; and because you don't dare to do 
that I can insult your knowledge with safety." It is nearly 
three hundred years since Bruno was burned at the stake 
for defending what are now the commonplaces of astronomy, 
yet even in his day he encountered the pretenders to a 
faith not held. "He was," we read, "perpetually de- 
claiming against the insincerity, the impostures of his per- 
secutors — that wherever lie went he found skepticism 
varnished over and concealed by hypocrisy, and that it 
was not against the belief of men, but their pretended be- 
lief, that he was fighting ; that he was struggling with an 
orthodoxy that had neither morality nor faith." 

If the prayers of Washington gave victory to the soldiers 
of the Revolution, as Dr. Dille asserts, then it follows that 
had Washington omitted his petitions, the United States 
would not have been born — which is to say that it was the 
original intention of the Almighty to defeat the Revolution, 
but that he was persuaded to alter his purpose by George 
Washington. According to the Dille view, that war must 
have been a trying time, to the Deity, since daily for years 
His ear was assailed by the prayers of the whole Church 
of England and by the American Tories in opposition t<> 
the representations of the American commander of the 
forces. Washington was undoubtedly a highly meritorious 
person, but Dr. Dille's God could not have been blind to 



the facts that George III., notwithstanding impaired 
faculties, was of superior devoutness ; that there were in 
the Church of England many thousands of deserving peti- 
tioners, and that the Tories of the colonies embraced most 
of the wealth and respectability of the era. It is true on 
the other hand, that it was fashionable in the highest 
circles of France to pray for the success of the rebels, but 
that, it may be surmised, did not count for much in Heaven, 
as the French aristocracy of that generation were a loose- 
living, careless lot. Still, a prayer is a prayer, and when 
the petitions are equally fervent on both sides of a contro- 
versy it is obvious that irresolution must afflict the Decider. 

Why, if Dr. Dille really believes that the Creator takes 
a personal and minute interest in the affairs of men, docs 
he trouble himself with stump-speaking in behalf of reform ? 
Why does he concert, himself with such feeble instrumen 
talities as the Civic Federation ? If Dr. Dille is sincere he 
will do the logical thing — retire from the profane political 
platform, go to his knees, and by prayer induce the 
Almighty to prevent the appointment of Dr. Levingston 
as Health Officer, to put an end to police corruption, to 
abolish the scarlet woman, abate political bosses and cheat- 
ing at primaries, make contractors honest, eliminate 
boodle from politics, and grant all the other ends for which 
the Federation is battling by mere worldly means. The 
Doctor's modesty may cause him to reply that he is not as 
great a man as Washington, which is doubtless undeniable ; 
but in point of goodness the Doctor, being a clergyman, it 
would be offensive to institute a comparison. Moreover, 
Washington asked for a good deal more than the Civic 
Federation desires. If Dr. Dille is not sincere, he is not 
the sort of man that it is well to have as a commissioned 
officer in the army of reform, for it is apparent that, with- 
out sincerity, he is but a fraud. 

The question of the efficacy of prayer, which Dr. Dille 
by his lecture has injected into San Francisco's practical 
affairs, is not likely to interest greatly the average voter. 
Nineteenth century men are entirely willing to admit that 
one who prays may derive much benefit from the exercise 
in the way of spiritual uplifting and strength of purpose 
to exert himself for the attainment of his wishes, but no- 
body above the intellectual grade of a Salvationist any 
longer supposes that the weather, the crops, wars, or 
stock quotations, or elections, or lottery drawings, re- 
ceive the personal supervision of the Most High. Time 
was when it was natural to believe otherwise. That was 
before science had taught us something about the ball on 
which we live and the laws of its existence. Dr. Dille's 
assertion that God changed His mind or had His sympa- 
thies enlisted by reason of Washington's importunity, 
would have fitted in very well with the state of knowledge 
when Halley's comet flared into the heavens and scared 
mankind. That was in 1450, and Pope Calixtus III. 
ordered all the church bells in Europe to be rung and the 
faithful to add each day another prayer to their tale, so 
that the harbinger of pestilence might be driven from the 
skies. It did disappear, and people then gave the credit 
to the Pope, just as now Dr. Dille gives the credit to Wash- 
ington for having won American independence through his 
influence with Heaven, Halley, being a presumptuous per- 
son who studied the laws of heavenly bodies, predicted 
that the comet would return in 1759, and back it came, 
according to schedule. There were plenty of Dilles left in 
1759 who took the same view of the comet as their ances- 
tors had taken in 145b', but their prayers did not excite 
the respect of the intelligent any more than the prayers 
of Dr. Dille for municipal reform would now awe the people 
of San Francisco. 

The Civic Federation owes something to San Francisco, 
It should ask for Dr. Dille's resignation. If his brain is so 
formed that he was in earnest as to his explanation of the 
cause of the triumph of the Americans and French over 
the English, he has not the sort of brain that the Federa- 
tion can safely make use of ; if he was merely impudent 
in venturing to affect a belief that affronted his modern 
audience, he is not the sort of man to be trusted. And, 
besides, he talks a great deal too much for a grown-up 
man, and does not talk well. His penchant for using lan- 
guage that to him and his parishioners sounds strong and 
striking but which to the worldly is forcible-feeble, offends. 
He is a bore. 



July 13, 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



M>u F»ir - » To be known t.. the world, to 1 
Trumphs Dam mouths, to be spoken of 

and Meaning. With 

doings chronicled in i>rint. and the chronl- 
8 liei-s will n by 
ring (treat victories en by leading in the 

adopt rvs, authors by writing great 

1I1 accompanies fame. There are for- 
tunate beings who receive all these rewardsoffine achieve- 
ments without doing anything to earn them, and these 
lucky ouea are commonly revered more than ail others. In 

olilcr countries they are kin;.-- and noble-. ; in this republic 

1 hey are rich persons. 
The other <lay our newspapers published, under a blazon 

of headlines, the news from New York that Miss Virginia 

Pair had " broken Mrs. Henry Clews's bicycle record." 

She hail ridden ten miles in fifty live minutes, a speed about 
half of that reached by common bicyclers when they try. 

This news was Bashed by wire. One of the dailies built a 

heading on the dispatch considerably longer than the dis- 
patch itself. That journal recognized news when it en- 
countered it — knew what would interest the public. A few 
days later a picture of Miss Fair's ear was printed among 
the ears of a dozen heiresses, and the verdict given that 
her ear took the prize for beauty. 

We are triad thai Miss Fair rides the bicycle so well and 
that she has an ear of superior prettiness. But what of 
it ? Who is Miss Fair and what has she done in the world 
thus to be made a public character, as if she were a Bern- 
hardt, an Ouida. a Susan B. Anthony, or a royal princess 
next in succession to a throne '! She is, from all accounts, 
a nice girl, but her sole claim to distinction is that she is 
the daughter and heiress of the late millionaire, James G. 
Fair, who was not specially remarkable during life for 
either the brilliance of Ms intellect or the worth of his 
character. Were Miss Fair poor she still would be nice, 
still would have a superior ear, and still could ride a 
bicycle, but who would think of putting into print these 
charms and accomplishments ? Miss Fair is merely rich. 
Otherwise she does not differ from the ordinary American 
girl of her age. 

We are a Nation It is not the young woman's fault that the 
of Snobs. press has given her national fame — for it 

is fame, and not notoriety merely. She is 
honored as well as celebrated. Doubtless her fame is not 
disagreeable to her any more than like renown is to other 
young ladies equally rich and equally destitute of real right 
to prominence. But that is neither here nor there. The 
point is that the press in lifting her and her kind to an 
eminence reached only by the moneyless when they possess 
exceptional talents, caters to a real demand. The news- 
papers know their business. The butler does not draw the 
corks of bottles for which his master has not shown a 
relish. If the press feels no degredation in its service to 
such a public, that is because the press is harmonized, in- 
tellectually and morally, to its environment. The cause is 
in the public, and behind that is another cause. Money 
buys all that is to be had socially in the United States. 
That is why money is worshiped here as nowhere else. We 
are the most vulgar people on earth — a nation of snobs. 

No doubt we are well rid of kings and nobles, a heredi- 
tary aristocracy. Nevertheless in getting rid of them we 
have got rid, too, of some incidental things that are desir- 
able. Where birth is above money, and the military caste 
above it, and the Government is linked with and part of 
both, money is kept in its place and does not rule. If an 
aristocracy of birth gives rise to servility in classes below 
it, at least the aristocrat is himself likely to be a gentle- 
man, and his women to be ladies, whose station imposes upon 
them the obligation of doing something a little more ardu- 
ous than riding bicycles and having ears. Money is neces- 
sary to such an aristocracy, but it is not everything. 
Socially speaking, a lord is preferable to a millionaire. 
Something is expected of the lord in the way of gentleman- 
hood and service ; nothing is expected of the millionaire, 
except that he shall serve himself by making more money. 
If he will but do that we of this simple republic are ready 
to bow down before him and worship him, and his children 
after him, provided they do not separate themselves from 
his money. And this will continue to be so until one of two 
things shall happen — the growth through time of a leisured, 



ornamental, edi D Other countries, or the 

development of a republican, an American, aristocracy, 
which shall understand the value and grace of simplicity 

and the vulgarity of imitation. In such an aristocracy 

there will be wealth, of course, for there cannot be 
elegance or the cultivation and gratification of refined 
tastes without it. but the possession of riches will not be a 
passport of admission. The Qnited States, when it shall 
have evolved an aristocracy of that kind, will not hi 
press which will chronicle the triumphs on the wheel of a 
Miss Fair, or make respectfully admiring pictures of her 
meritorious ear, because there will lie a public superior to 

the peasant slavishness of paying for and enjoying such 
news. Meanwhile, the paper that prints most tattle >>! the 
kind gets the largest circulation anil pays best. Thai is a 

solemn fact which the sociologist is not at liberty toignore. 

The public of the present has the taste of the servants' 
hall, and the press's function is to come down from where it 
has been waiting on t he gentlefolk, the rich folk, and re- 
tail what il has heard and seen in the upper regions. Self- 
respect should be taught in the public schools. 

Shall We The estimates of city expenditures for the 
Improve coming year were submitted on Monday to 
Or Stagnate ? the Board of Supervisors; they indicate 
that if the Auditor's recommendations are 
carried out, there will probably be an increased tax levy 
this year without any corresponding increase in improve- 
ments. The Auditor contemplates a city administration 
on the usual lines; the increase this year is made up of 
small augmentations all along the line. The rate of tax- 
ation will be fixed on the third Monday in September, in- 
stead of this month, as has been the custom heretofore. 
There is one point which it behoves citizens to consider 
more closely than the details of the Auditor's estimates; 
that is whether the time has not come for the inauguration 
of a system of city improvements commensurate with the 
possible future growth of the city. In all the great com- 
mercial seaports of the European world — London, Liver- 
pool, Havre, Amsterdam, Hamburg, Glasgow, Marseilles 
— a time came when the citizens had to decide whether 
they would spend money in improving the commercial facil- 
ities of their home, or allow it to stagnate. In a number of 
cities whose names we have not mentioned, public opinion 
was opposed to borrowing money for public improvements, 
and a regime of decay set in, whose fruits are still visible 
to the naked eye. In the seaports above enumerated, and 
in others which might be added to the list, a public spirit 
was developed which led to the construction of great sys- 
tems of improvements — miles of granite docks, great 
water works, railroads and tramways, electrical works, 
municipal canals, smooth streets and avenues; these have 
attracted so much traffic to the cities that at the present 
time they are almost out of debt, and have the improve- 
ments to the good. The question for San Franciscans to 
decide is — which example shall we follow? There are 
scarcely more public improvements in San Francisco than 
are found in a country village. Our streets are badly 
paved with the most primitive sort of pavement. Our 
water mains are so small that they do not furnish enough 
water to extinguish fires. Our drainage system is so mis- 
erable that periodical epidemics of zymotic disease supply 
doctors with a living. All forms of municipal service cost 
more than in cities of corresponding size in other parts of 
the country. The Harbor Commissioners are improving 
the water-front, but they are very slow about it; at the 
present time it presents the appearance of a wilderness; 
not a step has been taken to abolish the death trap at the 
foot of Market street by the construction of a bridge. All 
these shortcomings, which are merely inconveniences and 
annoyances to residents of the city, are substantial ob- 
stacles in the way of its progress. The question of the 
hour is whether it would not be sound economy to spend 
fifteen or twenty millions in improvements which would pay 
for themselves twice over before twenty year bonds 
matured, and which at any rate would make the city com- 
pare decently with Sydney, New South Wales. 

THE activity of Labor Commissioner Fitzgerald is in 
shining contrast with the torpor of his predecessor in 
office. Mr. Gottwals was content with the exertion of 
drawing his salary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895. 



Discontent With characteristic persistence and ag- 
Among gressiveness, David Lubin of Sacramento 

The Farmers, is carrying on his crusade for an export 
bounty on wheat and other agricultural 
staples. He is trying hard to get the farmers of the 
" Great West" aroused on the subject, and declares that 
hi' will make it figure in the next national campaign. He 
appears to be a thorough-going protectionist, and has the 
courage of his convictions, though some persons have 
fancied that he was cunningly attempting to bring the 
doctrine of protection into ridicule by reducing it to an 
absurdity. His argument is that the farmers get none of 
the benefits of the protective system, under existing ar- 
rangements, and that, since they have to contribute to 
the protection of all other domestic industries, they 
should be compensated by means of export bounties, see- 
ing that there is no other way in which they can get a 
fair share of the "fostering" which home industries are 
assumed to deserve. Thus Mr. Lubin is sowing the seeds 
of discontent broadcast through the huckleberry districts 
of the political area, and a great harvest of wrath may be 
expected to spring up in due time. Had a rampant Demo- 
crat and free trader undertaken to convince the Republi- 
can agriculturists of the United States that they have 
been used as the monkey in the fable used the paws of the 
cat, for the purpose of raking out the chestnuts from the 
fire, they would have refused to give ear to such heresy. 
But when an ardent Republican and protectionist advances 
the new doctrine, farmers of the same political faith will 
be disposed to listen attentively. Now that there is a 
general revival of manufacturing industries, and wages in 
the iron and other trades have advanced ten per cent, or 
more, the growers of wheat and corn may well inquire 
why it is that they have all along been paying excessive 
prices for implements and machinery, despite a falling 
market for their staples. They may logically insist upon 
either an export bounty or the removal of protective 
duties from all articles which they are obliged to buy for 
use upon the farm. With wool free of duty, they can see 
no reason why large protective duties should still remain 
upon woollen goods. And, while competing in the foreign 
markets with the labor of India, Russia and South 
America, with wheat at desperately low figures, they 
see no reason why they should pay tribute to favored in- 
dustries in the shape of excessive prices for their harvest- 
ing machines, their plows and shovels, churns and, in 
short, everything of a manufactured nature essential to 
their calling. 



A Blatant San Franciscans are now realizing that the 
Fraud. election of officials is a serious business, and 
not by any means a frolic, to be conducted 
with a guffaw and a hoop-la. Last November botli the 
Democratic and the Republican Conventions presented as 
candidates for the Mayoralty reputable, high-minded men, 
who would have discharged the duties of the office with 
credit to themselves and advantage to the city. Instead 
of taking either of them, the voters picked up a personage 
who is a cross between a Jew adventurer and a clown at 
a circus. As the elder Harrison was wafted into the 
Presidency on the foam of a can of hard cider which was 
drunk to the tune of "Tippecanoe and Tyler too," Mayor 
Sutro became the idol of the multitude by proclaiming that 
the railroad was our Octopus. Few people, knew what an 
octopus was; even Sutro himself would have probably been 
surprised to hear that it is acephalopodmollu.sk; but it 
had been called by such names as devil-fish, and squid, and 
kraken, and the voters thought that a man who could 
apply such terrifying appellations to their bete noire, the 
railroad, was just the man for the city. So he was elected, 
and, large as is the variety of the men who have filled the 
Mayor's chair, it. is safe to say that we never had before 
such a crank and such a blatant fraud in that station. 

See what lie did last week! Treasurer Widber having 
died, his son, who had been his deputy, was appointed in 
his place and filed the usual bond, which was approved 
by Judge Murphy. Mayor Sutro saw a chance of making 
a little cheap capital. He raised objections to the bond. 
His proper adviser, by whose opinion he was bound to be 
guided, was City and County Attorney Creswell; he was 
consulted and gave it as his opinion that the bond was 



good and sufficient. But the Mayor was not to be balked 
in his purpose of parading as a vigilant guardian of the 
city funds. He said he would consult another attorney. 
Auditor Broderick, wdio is a type of strict interpretation, 
and would rather be burned alive than audit a demand to 
which any plausible objection could be made, interposed 
with the statement that, in his opinion, the bond was good. 
But Sutro insisted on submitting the. case to ex-Judge Mc- 
Kinstry. That sound and learned lawyer politely informed 
the Mayor that he was utterly wrong. The blatant fraud, 
thus beaten from pillow to post, still refused to yield, took 
exception to the statements of the bondsmen, and finally 
announced that he would not allow the Treasurer to pay 
out a penny till he had personally counted every coin in 
the Treasury. So the Treasury doors were closed, and 
two thousand warrant holders, depending for their Sunday 
meal on their faithful redemption by the city, went home 
with empty pockets, sad eyes, anct wrath in their hearts. 

The Coming In ten days the first of the races of the 
Yacht Race, year for the America's cup will be sailed; 
nautical sharps are already coming to con- 
clusions to guide them in the betting. The Valkyrie III. 
had her trial trip on July 6; the Defender had hers on the 
day following. Both showed that they were good boats. 
At the English trial attention was chiefly directed to their 
capacity to carry the enormous sail area which is spread 
on modern yachts; American spectators thought that the 
Valkyrie was a trifle more tender boat than the Defender, 
while Englishmen expressed fears that in a strong wind 
the latter would be liable to keel over. On her own trial 
trip the Defender stood up well. Captain Hank Hoff said, 
at the close of the day: "Her ability to stand up in a 
breeze and carry that great spread of canvas was the only 
thing I was in doubt of; now I know she can carry it." 
The club syndicate came to the conclusion that in a breeze 
in which she is able to carry three lower sails, a club top- 
sail, and a jib topsail, she can beat the fast boats of last 
year a minute in every mile. If she can do this the cup is 
safe for another year. The utility of these yacht races, 
and the conscientious endeavor of shipbuilders in both 
countries to improve, the science of naval architecture, are 
well illustrated by the pictures which are appearing of the 
rival yachts. When the races for the cup were first in- 
stituted, some years ago, the only thing in common between 
the American and the British yachts was that they were 
both boats built to sail in the water. The Englishman was 
a narrow, deep, knife-blade craft, cutting through the 
waves like a long, sharp fish; the American was a soup 
plate with a moveable keel, which skimmed over the sur- 
face of the water and offered little resistance below the 
water line. Now, when you set pictures of the Valkyrie III, 
and the Defender side by side, it is hard to tell which is 
which. Each nation has been borrowing from the other; 
English and American types have been assimilating, and 
the result will be a mutual agreement upon a definite type 
which shall combine the excellencies of all previous experi- 
ments. The Valkyrie III. is more like an American yacht 
than the English boats of ten years ago. She has twenty- 
six feet beam, and carries eighty-five tons of ballast. Her 
single stick is enormous — the longest Oregon pine ever im- 
ported into England, and on its top stands a tremendous 
topmast. This implies a head rig which is American, not 
English; but designer Watson is reported as saying that, 
if it is necessary to copy American methods to win races 
in American waters, he will do it. It has even been stated 
that the Valkyrie III. lias a centreboard. This, of course, 
is untrue, but she seems to carry some contrivance to 
deepen her draft in light winds with a rolling sea running. 

THE sale of bonds lately negotiated by the Directors of 
the Paso Irrigation District of Kern County, will have 
the effect to strengthen the market for like securities all 
over the State. The fact that all irrigation bonds are a 
first lien upon the lands within the districts has operated 
against their sale, bankers and capitalists having taken 
exceptions to this feature of the law. These extensive 
enterprises have been seriously retarded by this one 
feature, and there has been considerable damage done to 
farmers by a failure to sell bonds and complete the various 
systems of irrigation inaugurated and partly built. 



July 13, 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Good Malarial The Southern I'aeitie Company Ikis done 
tor the State a good service in making very 

Road Making, low rate- of Freight on crushed stone 
from Polsom for road purposes. By an 
stature the Prison Directors were em- 
powered to set up at Foisom a plant for the crushing of 
rock, in ease the railroad company would make "reason 
able rates " for the transportation of the macadamising 
material. On the showing that the material would he 

used for the Improvement of streets and highways, the 

company has fixed the freight rates at merely nominal 
figures, and the Prison Directors have accordingly taken 

the necessary steps to provide for the rock crushing. 
Prom Foisom to Sacramento the charge will be but 26 
- B ton; to Oakland Pier, 80 cents: San Francisco. 
B5j Marvsville. and Napa. 55; Woodland, 
id to other points proportionately. It is estimated 
that the cost of getting out the rock at Foisom will not 
exceed 20 cents a ton, so that the crushed material, ready 
for use. may be landed here at a total cost of but $1.05 a 
ton. or $lo. ail a carload. The material may be used to 
great advantage on surburban roads, but it would be a 
mistake to employ it anywhere within a radius of two or 
three miles from the City Hall. The city has had enough 
of macadamizing, so far as residence streets are con- 
cerned. The bad condition of Van Ness avenue, which has 
long been an eye-sore, is attributable to the so-called 
macadamizing, particularly as the material used was of 
inferior character. Nothing short of bitumenizing should 
be permitted on streets well within the city limits. But 
for roads leading out into the country, and which would 
otherwise be nothing better than dirt roads, macadamiz- 
ing is a great improvement, where good material is used. 
The soft red rock that has commonly been employed in 
this city for macadamizing is wholly unfit for the purpose. 
A top-dressing of such stuff is not real macadamizing at 
all. It is an improvement over earth, of course, but is far 
from conforming to that system of road making which 
takes its name from Macadam. His method consists in 
the application of hard stone, broken into angular pieces 
of a size small enough to pass through a ring not exceed- 
ing an inch or an inch and a half in diameter. He spread 
a layer of such broken stone upon a road bed suitably pre- 
pared, and then compacted the surface evenly and 
smoothly by means of heavy rollers. A road thus mac- 
acamized has a smooth, hard surface, which never becomes 
muddy, and with proper repairs will last for fifty years. 
With abundance of excellent material from Foisom, at 
merely nominal cost, the highways leading out of our towns 
and cities may be vastly improved, and at a small outlay. 
Nothing is more needed than good roads, not only for the 
pleasure of those who like to ride in buggies or on bicycles, 
but also for the more substantial benefit to the producers, 
whose profits are sensibly curtailed by the high cost of 
hualing over the ordinary roads, full of ruts and dust in 
summer, and in winter deep in mud. 

WE grow selfish as we grow old. Time was when Cuba's 
struggle for independence would have roused the 
people of the United States to helpful sympathy. Now 
we take little more interest in the conflict between the 
patriots and old Spain than we would in a dog fight. Per- 
haps our own discovery that the possession of free politi- 
cal institutions does not make everybody wealthy and 
happy has something to do with the decay of American 
enthusiasm for the sacred cause of liberty elsewhere. Still, 
it would look better if this republic evinced some concern 
for the Cubans. And we may some time have to do our- 
selves what they are trying to do. Spain has no business 
on this side of the world. Neither has any other monarchi- 
cal power. 

THE competition for circulation in the Santa Clara 
valley, between two or more of our dailies, has had 
the effect of bringing the prune into greater prominence 
than it has ever before enjoyed through the efforts of 
metropolitan journalism. It is pleasing to learn that the 
fruit growers are receiving good prices this season, and 
that the crop will be large, with no fears of over-produc- 
tion. And this seems to be true of other parts of the 
State in which fruit growing is a leading industry. 



La Belle Creole 



CIGARS 



10c. Straight 

2 for 25c. 

3 for 25c. 

Manufactured by 

S. Hernsheim Bros. & Co., New Orleans, La. 

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Because we are still 
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Of Imported 14-ounce 
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Pants trom $3 Up. 

TD6 Piumoutti Rock Go., 

(Successors to the Plymouth Rock Pants Co.) 
JOS. PINCUS, Agent, S. F„ Cal. 



fl. D. 1900 

Will have retired 
all of the "lift and 
peek" typewriting 
machines. 

The Williams is the first 
standard typewriter to adopt 
visible writing. Writes in 
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ribbons. Quickest learned. 
Easiest operated. Does the 
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The News Letter's new dress was cast by Pacific States Type Foundry 



) Washington St., 

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wwmaawgw 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895. 




British Politics The political situation in the British 
Beginning to Islands has clarified itself considera- 

Show Their Course, bly during the past week, and, 
though many things still remain in 
a condition of embarrassing obscurity, the ordinary ob- 
server can grope his way about with some little degree of 
certainty. It is not yet certain whether the dissentient 
Liberals have become Tories or the Tories have become 
dissentient Liberals in their general political sentiments. 
It is perfectly clear, however, that Mr. Chamberlain has 
succeeded in grasping a fair share of the loaves and fishes 
of official station. There is a presumption that he has 
done so at a very considerable expense of political princi- 
ple; exactly how considerable is purely a matter of con- 
jecture, for it is a curious fact that the new Ministry has 
made no declaration of policy which gives any idea of what 
its course will be in dealing with the public affairs of the 
nation in an administrative and legislative capacity. What 
basis of understanding has been arrived at between the 
two political groups of which the new Cabinet is composed, 
as to whose views are to dominate, remains a secret. The 
Duke of Devonshire was originally a Liberal of the old 
Whig variety; he was, indeed, more of a Whig than a 
Liberal, and his metamorphose into a Liberal Conserva- 
tive, in a Cabinet dominated by Tory Conservatives who 
are disposed to modulate their Toryism so as to meet the 
exigencies of existing conditions, was an easy and natural 
process of political evolution. With Mr. Chamberlain the 
situation is different. He was originally a Radical Liberal 
of the most pronounced type, and it is difficult to under- 
stand how he can join with the Tories in a general policy 
for the management and direction of the public affairs 
which does not embody an abandonment of fundamental 
principle on either one side or the other. Whether such 
an abandonment has actually taken place appears, how- 
ever, to be still a matter of speculation. The new Minis- 
try appears to have gone before the country upon nothing 
more tangible than a policy of opposition to the policy of 
the late Ministry. It has put forth no affirmative policy 
of its own. This concealment has a curious look about it, 
and one is justified in assuming that it arises from one of 
two causes. Either Lord Salisbury was afraid to admit 
before the people that he had made any compromise with 
his life long convictions for the sake of office, or there has 
been no definite and complete adjustment of the minis- 
terial policy, and the whole matter has been left partially 
open until the result of the election is known. The last al- 
ternative seems to be the most likely. If it is correct, 
then the matter stands thus: If the Tories carry the coun- 
try and secure such a parliamentary majority as will enable 
them to do without the support of Chamberlain and his 
followers, then we will have a genuine and true-blue 
Tory administration and policy; but if, on the other hand, 
the lines are drawn so tight in Parliament that the Minis- 
try can only hold on to power with the assistance of the 
Chamberlain faction, then we will have a Tory policy modi- 
fied so as to meet the idiosyncrasies of the former Radical. 
It is a curious situation. 

What the Outcome By this time next week the 

of the first batch of the elections 

General Election Will Be. in Great Britain will have 
taken place, and, unless the 
results be very close, will have given an approximate indi- 
cation of what the political complexion of the next House 
of Commons will be. It is a significant fact in this connec- 
tion that those remarkable men, the correspondents of our 
daily press, are beginning to hedge. They have been tell- 
ing us for months past that the Roseberry Ministry was 
holding office upon the suffrance of the Tories, but, when it 
came to a show-down, the Liberal Cabinet retired, not be- 
cause its supporters were outnumbered, but because they 
were quarreling among themselves, and the Tory leader 
would only accept office upon condition that his opponents 
would support him and grant him supplies until a new Par- 



liament could be elected. In the same strain these same 
correspondents have been telling us for more than a year 
past that a general election was sure to result in an over- 
whelming victory for the Tories. Now that the general elec- 
tion is at hand these prophets are beginning to qualify and 
explain. They are not quite so sure of the result. If the 
election had taken place when the change of Ministry oc- 
curred, one fellow solemnly averred the other day, there 
would have been no question as to the result, but in the 
interval the. Liberal prospects have improved. Now it- 
would be difficult to conceive of anything more, absurd than 
that statement. There has been no time since the last 
general election that the Tory clubs have not professed to 
be quite sure of an overwhelming victory if given another 
chance; there has been no point in all that interval when 
the political conditions gave any unbiased observer reason 
to believe, that such a result wasexceedingly likely, much less 
absolutely certain, to occur; and there never was a moment 
since the last general election when the political conditions 
looked more favorable to the Tories than they do at the 
present moment. The indications are that they will win 
by a small majority, and they will win not because there 
has been any marked revulsion of public feeling toward 
Liberal policies and sentiments, but because the Liberal 
party is leaderless and divided into discordant factions. 
The signs of the times in British politics, as we read them, 
are that the ensuing election will be a very close one and 
that the resulting Parliament will be a troubled and short- 
lived one. If the Tories are obliged to carry Chamberlain 
they will find the burden a very onerous one. 

France Roped In The news is that the Chinese loan, as 
on the guaranteed by Russia, has been floated 

Chinese Loan. in Prance. This is another triumph of 
Russian diplomacy. Practically it 
means that French financiers are pulling Russian chest- 
nuts out of the fire in great shape. This is the price which 
France is paying for a secret treaty with Russia, which 
the Czar has so little respect for that he has actually de- 
nied its existence. The truth is that the newspaper ru- 
mors of what was termed an Anglo-Russian entente which 
were set in motion at the time of the last Czar's death, 
seem to have rattled the French statesmen so that 
they have lost their heads more completely than the 
newspaper correspondents did. As a consequence they 
have since been cultivating Russia's good graces with 
more assiduity than the most ardent lover ever exhibited 
in the wooing of his sweetheart. The Russian diplomats, 
who are a cool and crafty lot. have not missed the oppor- 
tunities which the excessive eagerness of France has pre- 
sented to them. As a result the French government seems 
of late to be playing the role of "Me Too." It is observ- 
able, however, that all the tricks which are taken go into 
the Russian stack. 

The Survival of the Fittest. 
Furniture moved, stored, packed, and shipped at low rates by Morton 
Special Delivery. Only experienced men employed. Equipment flrst- 
class. Offices— 31 Geary street, and 408 Taylor street. 

For visiting cards, envelopes, writing papers, in fashionable tints 
and shapes, and all ladies' stationery at reasonable prices, go to San- 
born, Vail & Co.'s, 741 Market street. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 



For sale by all first-class Wine 
Merchants and Grocers 

W. B. CHAPMAN, sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 123 California St 



July 







SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THI Pourth was the wettest day we have had 

weeks, and, consequently, was ;> melancholy 
damper upon all the out-of-door plans made tor the day 
- and the like w< crtven up in ihi> 

section of the country on ai the heat, bul the idea 

of suffering from a torrid temperature might well have 
been abandoned long ago, as the South for four or five 
- has not been nearly a> hoi as Decoration Day. The 
matter did not interfere with tl e yacht races, but all other 
tainments were interrupted. Clay Greene had a party 
of guests at his beautiful home at Bayside, Long rsland, 
Mr. Lake had a number of guests at lii> place on the 
Hudson, amongst whom were Mr. and Mrs. "Willie" 
Brown, Mi-> Ferrer, and Bugo Toland. all of San Fran- 
Mrs. D. C. Nichols was expected, but has gone to 
La Crosse, Wisconsin, on account of her mother's severe 
and. in fact, dangerous illness, she will visit Galena and 
Chicago before returning to New York in the autumn. 
Lieutenant John Chamherlin is visiting his father and 
mother in South Livonia. New York. Captain Dillenbeek 
is on his way to the Berkshire Bills with his battery. 
Lieutenants Oyster and Bailey accompany him. Miss 
Caroline Hamilton (nee Milzner) is organizing a quartette 
and intends singing at the watering places during the sum- 
mer. Miss Hamilton will rejoin the Bostonians in the au- 
tumn. The Loaizas have just sailed for Germany. Miss 
Marie Burroughs went on the same steamer, also Mrs. C. 
A. Baldwin. Harry Hall is one of the old Californians 
whom I see now and then in New York. He is growing 
handsomer constantly, and is a very attractive and clever 
man. Mrs. Hall and her sister, Mrs. Hinchman, are in 
the Adirondacks. Mrs. and Miss Behrendt are at the 
West End. Long Branch. The Gilligs are entertaining 
largely on their yacht. Mrs. Gillig is as enthusiastic on 
yachting as her sportsmanlike husband. Mrs. and Miss 
Foltz, of your city, are at Newport. The Stanley Dexters 
have gone to Oyster Bay for the summer. Mrs. Atherton 
is, I hear, making a great hit socially in England. She 
is so clever that it is not difficult for ber to impress Eng- 
lishmen, who are used to the slow-witted women of their 
country. The Reverend M. C. Levy, of San Francisco, is 
in London for the season. Lady Hesketh is at the Wal- 
dorf. Arthur Sime is visiting his mother at New London. 
Miss Frances Jolift'e is off at a friend's country house for 
a month; when in New York she has a pretty studio in 
Carnegie Hall. Miss Olive Oliver, a California girl, has an 
important r6le in the new play, Horace, to be produced by 
the Hollands at the Garrick Theatre Dext month. Hugo 
Toland is also in the cast. '"Johnny " Doyle is at the St. 
James Hotel. He has been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Jack 
O'Connor at Yonkers. Mr. and Mrs. George Goodrich 
have gone to the Hotel Castleton, Staten Island, for the 
summer. Mr. and Mrs. Billson (Mrs. Billson was Miss 
Juliette Kitchen) have taken a cottage at Saratoga for 
the season. Mr. and Mrs. Gunter are also there for the 
summer. Colonel Trumbo has been in town for a few days, 
and has just left for the West. I understand we are to 
see his genial countenance again in the autumn. Mrs. 
Hearst and her son are in Paris, and going on to Germany. 
Richard Ferrer is on a concert tour through England. 

Passe-Partout. 
New York, July 5th, 1895. 

Afcer a trip of three months' duration through the marts and art 
centers of Europe, Mr. S. Gump has returned to this city. His 
many years' experience as a connoisseur in art has resulted in gath- 
ering some of the choicest at tides de vertn from the Old World, and 
the firm of 8. & G. Gump, on Geary street, has just received a por- 
tion of the beautiful goods he has selected. The bronzes, cloisonne 
ware and statuary that has arrived are the most exquisite that could 
be selected. We congratulate the firm on securing such gems of 
art. Mr. Gump realizes that the buyers of these goods here want 
the best, and he has certainly secured them. 



"El Monte" Hotel, Sausalito, is now open for the summer sea- 
son, at prices to suit the times. Hot and cold salt water baths are 
connected with the hotel. 



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Pacific Coast Agents, San Francisco, Portland, Los Angeles 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1895, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four and eight-tenths (4 8-10) per cent, per annum on term deposits, 
and four (4) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after MONDAY, July 1, 1895. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Office— 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1895. a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four and eight-tenths (4 8-10) percent, per annum on term deposits, 
and four (4) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and afte^ MONDAY, July 1, 1-895. Dividends not called for are 
added to and bear the same rate of dividend as the principal, from and 
after July 1, 1895. CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier, 

Office— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending June 30th, 1895, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four and eight-tenths (4 8-10) per cent, per annum on Term De- 
posits, and four (4) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday, July 1, 1895. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office— 526 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, June 28, 1895. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four and one-quarter (1M) per cent, per annum on 
all deposits for the six months ending June 30, 1895, free from all taxes, and 
payable on and after July 1, 1895. ROBERT J. TOBTN, Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895. 




"We Obey No Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

NEARLY every evening since the opening night, the 
Columbia Theatre has been crowded, and the efforts of 
Mr. Frawley's Company have received the most flattering 
encouragement. On Monday evening next the first pre- 
sentation in San Francisco will be given of Bronson 
Howard's greatest comedy success One Of Our Girh. 
The play will be produced here under the personal direc- 
tion of Miss Helen Dauvray from tlfe original manuscript. 
A New York girl, Kate Shipley, the daughter of a banker, 
goes to visit in Paris some of the noble relatives of her 
dead mother. She is, in a sens a , betrothed to a French 
Duke, who wants her simply because he understands that 
she has a handsome dowry. But the American girl pays 
no attention to him and begins by falling in love with an 
English captain whom she meets ir. a society which is 
shocked by her free and unconventional manner. She can- 
not understand the customs that forbid her to go through 
the streets of Paris in broad daylight and her people can- 
not comprehend the character of the semi-savage who 
sets at naught, the idea that a young girl shall never be 
seen alone with a young man. But in the meantime, the 
girl's cousin, Julia, is married to a count whom she loathes; 
her parents having adopted the French system of uniting 
her to a man of their choice and not of hers, while in 
reality she loves some one else. The Count perceives the 
affection of his wife for Henri St. Hilaire, and a duel is 
arranged between them, which is put off by the offices of 
a mutual friend. The lover is about to depart when the 
young wife visits him in his rooms and wants him to take 
her away. At this moment the American girl steps in to 
prevent the dishonor of the wife when the Count arrives. 
The two women conceal themselves, but the Count de- 
mands to search the rooms of the house to find his wife. 
The lover denies and they light then and there. At this 
critical moment the American girl appears and is over- 
come at the arrival of the man she herself is engaged to. 
and who sees her issuing from the bedroom of his friend. 
But she consents to take the obloquy on herself to save 
her cousin, the wife of the Count, who is still within. Then 
the English captain challenges the French Count, and they 
fight, the Count of course is worsted, not in the fight, but 
in the fact of having another wife. Thus all ends happily, 
and the good nature of Kate Shipley is shown. 
* * * 

The Baldwin Theatre will open its doors for the season 
Monday evening and will offer on that occasion the first 
thoroughly high-class attraction which has been seen in 
in our city for some time. Daniel Frohman's Lyceum 
Theatre Company is beyond doubt one of the foremost 
organizations visiting this coast and the class of plays it 
has always offered here during the eight years it has been 
in existence were the best obtainable in the market of the 
world. The engagement of this organization is for three 
weeks and three new plays will be offered during that time, 
each limited to a single week. The opening play will be the 
(.omedy, T.< Case of Rebellious Susan, by Henry Arthur 
Jones, the author of The Middleman, The Dancing Girl, and 
Tin Miixijiiiriuli rx. The second play will be The Amazons, 
by Arthur W. Pinero, and the third the recent English 
comedy success, An Ideal Husband, which is still being pro- 
duced in London. Mr. Herbert Kelcey, W. J. Le Movne, 
Mr. and Mrs. Walcot, Fritz Williams, Elizabeth Tyree, 
Mrs. Thomas Whiff™ and Ernest Tarleton are still on the 
roster of the Company, which comes to the Baldwin 
Theatre on its eighth annual tour on Monday evening. Of 
the new faces, Miss Isabel Irving, Annie Irish, Maud 
Vernier and Messrs. Stephen G-rattan, Walter Hale, 
Ferdinand Gottschalk, Edward Wilkes, and Wilfred Buck- 
land represent the prominent additions during the past 
two years. 

* # * 

It is now definitely settled that Rose Coghlan, Maurice 
Barrvmore, and Henry E. Dixie will appear in the cast 
with L. R. Stock-well and a company of well known actors 
and actresses, following the Frawley Company's engage- 



ment at the Columbia Theatre. Miss Helen Dauvray's 
first appearance upon any stage was in this city as Eva 
in Uncle Turn's Cabin. She scored an immediate suc- 
cess, and became attached as child actress, to the 
regular company, which, at that time, comprised many of 
the noted and eminent actors and actresses of the world. 
The souvenirs to be given to every lady attending the per- 
formance on Monday evening next at the Columbia Theatre, 
are being specially gotten up in Sau Francisco and will be 
quite a surprise to those who come to witness One of 

Our Gir/s. 

* * * 

A Black Sheep conies to the California Theatre next 
Monday evening, and will be presented under Mr. Charles 
Hoyt's personal direction. For .welve weeks just passed 
the Grand Opera House, Chicago, has been crowded 
nightly to witness this latest and funniest play by Mr. 
Hoyt. Every performance was given in a whirlwind of 
applause and laughter, and songs and dances were rede- 
manded time after time. Mr. Hoyt has been peculiarly 
fortunate in securing people to interpret his work. How 
the part of " Hot Stuff" could be played better than by 
Otis Harlau it is difficult to conceive. His spirit, his dash, 
his overflowing humor and quaiut methods are exactly 
suited to the character, and he sings the songs allotted him 
with admirable expression. 

# * * 

Balfe's melodious opera, Satanella or The Fower of Love, 

will follow the splendid run of Tar uml Tar'.ar. When 
originally produced at this house this work had an ex- 
tended run of over nine consecutive weeks. New scenery 
has been designed and painted by Oscar Fest, new pro- 
perties, accessories, and novel electrical effects have also 
been prepared. Miss Louise Royce will enact and sing 
the title role. Laura Millard, Alice Neilson, Martin 
Pache, who makes his first appearance with the company, 
Ferris Hartman, John J. Raffael, Arthur Mesmer, W. 
H. AY est, andSignor O. Napoleoui will appear in the cast. 
The beautiful tones of the harp will be heard through 
Balfe's celebrated aria, Tin Power of Love. 



Berkshire Typewriting Paper is the best. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 
Tit Market street, sole agents. Liberal discount to large consumer. 

Bl J ' T*L J Al. Hayman & Co.. (Incorporated) 

aldvVin I neatre- Proprietors: 

Monday, July loth — Opening of the season. Eighth annual tour Of 
DANIEL FROHMAN'S 

LuGGum Theatre Company. 



Herbert Kelcey 

W. J. LeMnyur 

Charles Walcot 

Annie Irish 

Mrs Thos. Wbiffen 

Edward Will; 



THE PLAYERS: 

Fritz Williams 
Stephen Grattau 
Walter Hale 

Elizabeth Tyree 

Maud Veuuer 
Wilfred Buckluud 



Ferd Gottschalk 
ErneSl Tarletou 
Isabel Irving 
Mrs. Chits. WalOOt 

Katherlne Elorenoe 



The play for the first week only will be the new comedy, 

THE GMSE OF REBELLIOUS SUSAN. 

By Henry Arthur Jones 

Second week— THE AMAZONS, by Arthur W. Pinero. 

Third week— AN IDEAL HUSBAND, the new English comedy. 

G| 1 ' T'L J_ The "Gem' 1 Theatre of the Coast. 

OlUmDia I nea"tre- Friedlauder. Gottlob&Co., Lessees 
and Managers. 
Week July loth. Special and important engagement of Miss 
Helen Dauvray, who will appear with the Frawley Compauy in 
Bronson Howard's greatest comedy success, 

ONE OF OUR GIRLS. 

The banner play and record-breaker of all New York comedy 
successes. Elegant and costly souvenirs presented to every 
lady attending die opening night's performance. No udvauee 
in prices. 

July 22d— Another great comedy, " THE JILT." 
Our popular prices— Night, ISO., 25c, Sue. 75c. Saturday mati- 
nee, 15c. 25c, 50c. 

Al,. Hayman & Co.. (Incorporated) 
Proprietors. 

Beginning Monday, July 15th First presentation in this city 
of HOYT'S latest and greatest success. 

A BLACK SHEEP. 

Direct from its triumphant run of more than one hundred nights 
at Chicago. Otis Harlan as "Hot Stuff ,? 



California Theatre 



July 13. 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



LETTER FROM CASTLE CRAGS. 

TH! - 1 ttiink the fact of 

to the fa< I 
d has Bent us its 
.ind they furnish their share of the 
amusements. Mr>. Will .it the bead of every- 

thing. She and Willy Gwin arc the - originators 

the fun and frolic. They finrt led the german, which 
na a grand Boocess. They, with Bomeof the others, went 
to Dunsmuir and ransacked the town, to the joy as well 
ostentation of the shopkeepers. They bought a num- 
ber of straw hats, grangers at that, which wen- trimmed 
by the young ladies with raveled rope and tufte of pine. 
They made a most unique figure when worn by the girls, 
ones, carrots, fire-crackers, and must funny of all 
was faces of the "Ha Ha" family cut out of bark. Tin- 
next was a sheet and pillow case party, which furnishes 
amusement not only to the participants, but to the spec- 
tator?-, each one trying to find out "who was who." Then 
Mrs. Clark Crocker sent out invitations to a Clover Tea. 
the idea evidently taken from the News Letter of a few 
weeks ago. When the company were assembled at the 
cottage all were decorated with bunches Ol clover tied with 
green or pink ribbon, and were sent forth card in hand to 
gather four-leaf clover. It was a most lovely sight, the 
ladies in their pretty light gowns and hats and the men in 
white trousers and black coats, or light suits. After 
searching for half an hour they were called in and the re- 
turns were announced by Judge Van Fleet with Mr. Glass- 
cock, of Oakland, assisted by Mr. Frank and Mr. Talbot. 
The prizes were beautiful and appropriate; the first ladies' 
prize was a photo frame, clover leaf shape, and decorated 
with clover, the second a green paper box with clover on 
the top and filled with candy; the consolation prize was a 
pickle fork with clover top. The first prize for men was a 
clover pin of green enamel, the second a pen-wiper with 
silver clover; the consolation prize a paper knife with 
clover on the blade. The refreshments were beer, crackers, 
Saratoga coolers and tea. All pronounced it a grand suc- 
cess. Mrs. Clark Crocker has done a great deal in the 
way of pleasure for the young people as well as old, having 
given several afternoon euchre parties. The next in order 
will be a play gotten up by Mrs. Taylor and Willy Gwin, 
which is to be given at The Cottage. Horseback riding, 
dancing, playing cards, and fishing keep everybody busy 
and amused. Barring a few accidents every one is well 
and happy. Many of the guests left after the Fourth, but 
many others are coming, who have been kept waiting for 
lack of room. The Oakland contingent go down Sunday 
night, having a whole sleeper for their accommodation. 
There have been a few rattlesnakes killed, but as there is 
plenty of good whiskey at the club house no one need suffer. 
Castle Crags, .July 10, 1895. Hannah. 

THE BORDEAUX WINE EXPOSITION. 

President Faure Visits the Wine Palace. 

The banquet on the occasion of the President's reception by the 
exhibitors of wines at Bordeaux was arranged by a special commit- 
tee composed of eminent experts and epicureans, and was acknowl- 
edged to be a chef d'azuvre of modern times as regards the excellence 
of the dinner, as well as the judicious selection of wines. Four 
hundred guests were present. Monsieur Eugene Buhan, director of 
the wine commission, expressed in a happy vein the appreciation 
and gratitude felt by the 450 exhibitors of France's best products at 
the President's presence, who was frequently and heartily cheered. 

Following is the list of wines served: Chateau Yquem, 1890; 
Chateau Ausone, 1877; La Mission, 1877; Leoville-Poyferre, 1878; 
Chateau Margeau, 1877 ; Mouton-Eothschild, 1877; Chateau Lafitte, 
1875; Xeres Sandeman— champagne, Pommery Sec. 

The banquet was pronounced to be the most successful, affair dur- 
ing the exhibition. Vinicole de la Gironde, Bordeaux. 

El Campo Sunday playground has provided the people of San 
Francisco with a most delightful place for recreation during the 
present season. It has become a popular resort, where music and 
dancing, and all sorts of social games, as well as athletic sports, are 
indulged in. It is close to the city, offers a delightful trip across the 
Bay, and has been fitted up in the most attractive style for the ac- 
commodations of those who seek pleasure for a day. 



The Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. F. reads all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies clippings on all topics, business 
and personal. 




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BOTTLING CELLARS-Larkin and McAllister Sts., S. F. 
VINEYARD. WINERY, and CELLARS— Livermore. Cal. 

Mrs. Ernestine Kreling. 

Proprietor and Manager 

Last nights of the glorious American comic opera, TAR AND 

TARTAR. 

Next week, Balfe's melodious spectacular open" 



Tivoli Opera House. 



SATAN ELLA, 

or, THE POWER OF LOVE. 
New scenery, effects, costumes, and accessories 
Popular Prices 35c and 50c 



EL GAMPO, 



THE POPULAR BAY RESORT, now open every Sunday dur- 
ing the season. Music, Dancing, Bowling, Boating, Pishing, 
and other anmsemenls. Refreshments at city prices. 
Fare, round trip, 35c: children. 15c, including admission to 
grounds. 

The steamer UKIAH will leave Tiburon Ferry 10:30 A. M., 12:10 
2:00, and4:00P.M. Returning, leave El Campo 11:15 A. u., 1,3, 
and 5 P.M. 

Rankin, Thomas X Go., 

THEATRICAL BUREAU AND AGENTS, 
916 MARKET ST., Columbian Building, Room 46. 
Professional talent for private entertainments furnished at 
short notice. Entire charge taken of same. Plays, sketches, 
etc., for sale or rent. Wanted, at all times, dramatic and 
vaudeville artists. Agents for C. D. Hess, Grease Paints 
and general stage make up. 

1 II I 1AM DCnnARR Tlie En & lisn actress, coaches ladies and gentle- 
LILLIAN DCUUnnU. men for the dramatic professton; appearances ar- 
ranged. Shakespearean classes Wednesday eveniDgs. SHAKESPEAR- 
EAN ACADEMY, 913 Hyde street. San Francisco, Cal. 

ASK YOUR GROCER FOR 



UPS'MCAKEMEAL"^ 

,s" ^T THETHINC fob r 

CampeRS 



30-32 California St., S. F. 



FRANK B. PETERSON & CO., Agents, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895. 






THE General Henry Mclver, ex-Consul to some place in 
Spain, whose charges against the Cleveland Administra- 
tion tilled columns of all the leading papers in the country 
this week, is one of the most remarkable men living. From 
boyhood he has been a professional adventurer: a soldier of 
fortune, probably without an equal to-day in the world. He 
is a Scotchman by birth, and he served in the East India 
Company's service during the Indian Mutiny in 1857. From 
there he went to join Garibaldi, and served through the 
Sicilian campaign. He came to this country during the 
early stages of the Civil War, and he joined the Confeder- 
ate Cavalry, where he remained until the surrender of Lee. 
Once more free, he went to New Orleans and joined in the 
attempt to raise a corps of ex-soldiers to fight for the 
Mexican Republic against the French, in which, however, 
he failed. He next turned up in the East, where he ob- 
tained a position on the staff of the Pasha of Egypt, and 
he remained there until the breaking out of the Franco- 
German war, when he left for France and by some means 
got a Lieutenant-Colonel's commission on the staff of a 
General in the Army of the North. From France, it is 
said that he went to Spain, where he fought with the 
Carlists, but on that point we are not sure. We know, 
however, that when the war between Servia and Turkey 
began, Mclver was again in the field, this time in the Ser- 
vian Cavalry, and we know, too, that he received the mili- 
tary order of the Tekova for his services during that war. 
This ended his active military career, although it is also 
said that he served in Cuba and South America, but here 
again we are in doubt. But the ending of his military career 
did not end his adventures, for he next appeared in Eng- 
land, where he ran away with a highly connected young 
lady, from the Isle of Wight, from whom he has since been 
divorced. About six or seven years ago he sailed for 
Queensland, and, while there, he succeeded in getting the 
Government of that Colony to promise material aid if he 
would organize an expedition to conquer New Guinea. But 
this, too, fell through, and he next appeared in New York, 
where he published a book, Under rmtrteen, F'ags, and so 
we trace him down to 1893, when he was appointed by 
President Cleveland as Consul at Denia, Spain, which posi- 
tion he resigned, and returned to this country and then 
made his serious charges against the Consular Bureau. It 
has often been said of General Mclver that he "lived 
sword in hand," and while this may be an exaggeration, 
yet one knowing his career sometimes wonders that he 
has lived so long. 



All San Franciscans who can look back as far as even 
1870 remember Smyth Clark, Bohemian, gentleman, 
wit, and the inseparable companion of George Bromley. 
So closely were the two affiliated that on the occasion of the 
Dickens Fancy Dress Ball at Union Hall, twenty-one years 
ago, the pair went dressed as the Cheerybel Brothers. 
Smyth Clark used to live exactly opposite St. Mary's 
Cathedral, on the northwest corner of Dupont and Cali- 
fornia streets, and one Sunday morning when he was un- 
able to sleep, he got up at five o'clock and went to mass. 
To use in substance his own words as he used to tell the 
story , he would say : "The infernal bell woke me up, so I 
dressed and went into the church. I found my way to the 
front and got into D. J. Oliver's pew. There was a mission 
going on and such a crowd that I couldn't get out until I 
had heard two masses and a sermon about the Saints. 
Then I had breakfast and I thought I'd take in all the 
churches at one dose, so I went to Trinity. There I heard 
a sermon about the Apostles, and I went to lunch at the 
club. In the afternoon I struck a Methodist Church with 
a sermon on miracles, and in the evening I went to a 
Presbyterian church and listened to a discourse on the 
parables. But poor old God! I did not hear a word 
about Him all day long." Smyth Clark did not mean to be 
irreverent, and he probably came as near the truth as if he 
had used more delicate language. 



San Rafael society is much distressed over two prospective 
duels, and the Kittle boys have been chasing all over the 
country for their brother-in-law, Basil Heathcote, the past 
week. Heathcote is the well known liquor merchant, for- 
merly the partner of Harry Dexter. He is also the scion of 
a distinguished country family in Wiltshire, England — 
Forests of Deane, if I mistake not. But of late his friends 
have been consulting the physicians concerning his mental 
condition, and the climax occurred on the night of July 
4th. at the ball in the Hotel Rafael. 

Heathcote. it seems, had been for an outing with his 
friend McMillan, of the Bank of British North America, at 
Lagunitas Lake. What happened Mr. McMillan vividly de 
scribes, but he vows he'll never risk his skin again in a 
small boat with Mr. Heathcote in it. 

But, Fourth of July, Ward McAllister gave a dinner to 
twenty guests, among them Baron and Baroness Von 
Schroeder, Baron Von Bolverin, Mr. and Mrs. Boyd, Mrs. 
Heathcote and others. With his accustomed urbanity, Mr. 
McAllister selected a popular champagne — just a little 
sweet, because of the ladies. This displeased Basil Heath- 
cote exceedingly, and he manifested his displeasure, so the 
other guests declare, in a rather odd fashion. 

" Wardie." he is said to have said, "this is the vilest 
wine I ever drank. Change the brand, for the love of 
heaven! I'm ashamed of you. Get me a dry bottle! Hi, 
there, waiter, bring me a dry bottle! " 

To say the least, the table was "paralyzed." The ladies 
looked the other way, and the gentlemen were dark with 
anger. 

'• Bring a bottle of Brut Imperial for Mr. Heathcote," 
said McAllister, quietly, to the waiter. 

"And hurry up! " exclaimed Heathcote, brushing his 
glass off the table in such a manner that its contents were 
emptied over the gown of the lady at his side. Instantly 
there was a row, in which Baron Von Schroeder led. There 
is no need of explaining the particulars, but suffice it to 
say the imported Heathcote was persuaded to go to his 
room and cool his heated brain. Yet they say that Baron 
Von Schroeder is still implacable. 

# * * 

The evening was not over yet, for after the dinner there 
was a cotillion in the Hotel parlors, in which many young 
people took part. In the middle of one of the figures there 
appeared the disheveled figure of Mr. Heathcote, to the 
consternation of the revellers. Approaching Baron Von 
Bolverin, who is a Hollander of noble birth, he exclaimed 
in tones of thunder: 

"You have tried to steal my two books!" 

The Baron could not gather his senses for a moment, but 
stared in blank amazement. Finally he found his tongue: 
"Vat pooks?" he gasped. 

"Two years ago," roared Heathcote, "I loaned you two 
books, and when vou sent them back my name was rubbed 
out!" 

Just as the Baron was issuing a general challenge to re- 
sent the aspersion, W. W. Davidson, of the Nevada Bank, 
stepped between the two and gently but forcibly persuaded 
Mr. Heathcote to go to bed again. And now San Rafael 
is all agog over it. 

* * * 

Around the corridors and in and out of the glittering 
Baldwin may be seen the slim form of the junior George C. 
Gorham, cool, calm, and self-poised. When not engaged in 
his duties as an attorney for the Kern County Land Com- 
pany, he leaves the heat of the San Joaquin Valley and 
spends his vacations at this splendid hostelry. His pres- 
ence suggests an incident in the politics of the State in 
1868, in which his more dashing and brilliant father took a 
part in company with Judge W. T. Wallace. They were 
engaged in a joint discussion on the political issues of the 
period, visiting all parts of the State, and although differ- 
ing in politics, they were good friends. Among other 
points visited was San Jose, at that time not so regal in 
proportions and population as the Garden City of to-day. 
By some misunderstanding, no public notice had been given 
of the meeting, either by the committees of the two parties 

Prof, Doremcs in his chemical analysis of champagnes declares G. H. 
Mumm's Extra Dry the purest and most wholesome. Its importations 
during 1894 aggregate 80,778 cases, or 4!,7<H cases more than any other brand. 



July 13. 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



or thi 

■ i with a dilemma y under such eircuro- 

11 dispensed with. l>ut 
rom N'iiiL.' ■> man of commanding ability 
(1 a fuinl of dry humor, and it being 
on. In' >nw an oppor- 
tunity acuity. He Insisted that 
tin' programme should be arried out. They had been 

tmed by the landlord of the Auserais House, the hotel 
clerk, the porter, and the hostler, ami when the hour for 

;ing arrived they wer nfronted from the balcony 

of the hotel with an audiei eed of these four men 

and one other gentleman who happened to be passu 
The Judge opened the meeting with a half-hour's speech, 
and was followed by Qorham. who occupied an hour in a 
most vigorous and eloquent reply, and the five men chei red 
lustily. All this time the Judge >at watching the Bicker- 
ing embers of a bontire that had played its part and was 
subsiding, but the ridiculousness of the scene was too much 
for his Kentucky dignity, and when the time came for him 

-.• the discussion, he arose and said: "Fellow-citizens: 
I am deeply impressed with the solemnity of this occasion, 
and I now move that we adjourn and all take a drink." 
The motion was carried with three cheers and a tiger, and 
the Judge was the lion of the evening. 



When the Bohemian Club files in long procession through 
Meeker's Grove on August 3d, the memory of the Rev. Dr. 
Mackenzie will not be drank in a bumper. For that rev- 
erend gentleman, while holding a prayer meeting under 
those solemn and majestic trees, took occasion to comment 
upon the midsummer high jinks of the Bohemian Club. 
His discourse was to the eft'ect that while he, Dr. Macken- 
zie, was addressing the faithful, the spirit of sanctity hung 
even as a cloud over that woodland congregation. " But," 
continued the preacher, ' ' when the spirit of the Lord de- 
parts from here, Satan, in the shape of the Bohemian Club, 
will enter into those grand woods and profane those sublime 
surroundings." Much more to this effect did the worthy 
doctor deliver himself of. But why he should have selected 
the Bohemian Club as the target for his clerical arrows 
remains a mystery among that reputable organization. 
Indeed, steps have been taken to carry in with incense and 
acolytes at the opening of the midsummer jinks, St. John 
of Nipamuck. the patron saint of Bohemia, with the object 
of dissipating the Mackenzie atmosphere. 

* * * 

The Bohemian Club gave a welcome-home dinner on 
Friday night to Charles Warren Stoddard. The poet, 
though showing in a small degree the hand of time, was 
still the same Stoddard whose genial disposition and high 
intellectuality had endeared him to the old-time Bohemians. 
Mam- warm greetings were interchanged and speeches 
made. Mr. Dan O'Connell, who is a life-warm friend of 
Stoddard, wrote an original poem welcoming the poet back 
to the shores of the West. 

* * * 

Governor Budd has had a varied experience since he was 
elected. He has had occasion to exercise his native genius 
in reviewing the military and inspecting matters that were 
as foreign to his education and experience as the frigid is 
to the torrid zone. But he shields his ignorance by the 
exercise of his wit, and retains his dignity with the art of 
indifference coolly applied in the presence of experts. The 
other day he was called upon to inspect the Swatara at 
Mare Island, to be used as a naval training ship, and after 
the usual official formality, he suggested that the hold be 
well stocked with Wieland's Extra Pale, as it might be 
ordered to Bering Sea. 



Visit Laundry Farm, 
the terminus of the California Railway, Alameda County, for a pleas- 
ant day's outing. It is one of the most picturesque spots around the 
bay. No Sunday dancing and no liquors sold on the grounds. 



After dinner try Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum. You 
will find it admirable. 



Valises and Telescope Bags and Baskets for the million. San- 
born, Vail & Co. 741 Market street. 




©Q°®0© 




•Play" for 
..mil' women- 
hard work for 
others. Perhaps, 
for most women, more or less of both. Fix it 
to suit yourself. More play anil less work — 
that's when you wash ami clean with Pearline. 
Mori.: work and loss play — that's when you wash 
with soap in tin: old back-breaking way. Better 
work, too, with Pearline. Little or none of the 
rubbing that wears things out. It's something 
to think about, whether you do your own work, 
or have it done. Easter, quicker, better, cheaper 
— and absolutely safe. Facts about Pearline 
known by millions of women. 

Beware of imitations W5 TAMES PYLE, New Vork. 



NEW YORK. 



LONDON. 



The HARASZTHY 



CHAMPAGNE. 



BRUT, The Clubman's Wine 
CARTE BLANCHE, Society's favorite 
ECLIPSE, Extra Dry, The Convivial 



PHILADELPHIA. 



ARPAD HARASZTHY, 

G rower. 



CHICAGO. 



J. W. Stevens. Frank Sperling. 

SPERLING & STEVENS, 

Executive Specials. 
Bonds, Consols, and Income Investments. 

MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., Mutual Life Building, 

of New York. California and SansomeSts. 

A. B. FORBES &. SON, General Agents. 



EUREKA GARDEN HOSE. 




Goodyear Rubber Company, 

R. H. Pease, Vice-President and Manager. 
577-579 Market St., S. F. 73-75 First St., Portland, Or 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895. 




RUMOR is very busy assigning couples in pairs, begin- 
ning with the gallant, distinguished-looking General- 
in-Chief, whose devotion to the cavalry has made it a 
feature. But as gossip seems unable to definitely fix upon 
which widow is the favored one, nothing positive is said in 
that quarter. Lieutenant Summerall is, however, reported 
as having yielded to the charms of one of our sweetest 
buds, and Lieutenant Winston is also talked about as a 
victim to Cupid's darts. Strother will be greatly missed 
by the girls and matrons alike, being a general favorite. 
Faison is too indifferent to please all, but when Sam does 
put in his work he plays havoc with the belles, sure enough. 
The girls say Benjamin is too lixy ; but query : Can a man 
be too neat ? Croxton is a terrible flirt, and Burgess is 
more fond of the cuisine than the dance. The civilian chaps 
realize that the soldier boy is in the lead, and either con- 
tentedly drop into the background or hie them to B'ling- 
ham for consolation from the stand-bys of that paradise of 
belles of many seasons and matrons gay. 

* * * 

Really it is too much fun to watch Hubbard walk across 
the court when in leggings and knickers. If bicycling is a 
pedal extremity developer, out of sheer charity some one 
ought to present him with a wheel. He and Wardie Mc- 
Allister make a team in that respect. Some one did sug- 
gest anti-lean or malt to this young man while the travesty 
of Romeo and Juliet was in progress, but he declined all 
suggestions with thanks; and, had it not been for the de- 
termined efforts of the dresser that evening, the gallery 
gods might have heaped ruin, instead of success, on the 

play. 

* * * 

Why is Dr. Harry Tevis so hard to capture? is a puzzle 
which many girlish brains have been trying in vain to 
solve. The handsome doctor is devoted to so many pretty 
maids in turn no one. can feel either slighted or preferred 
for any length of time ! His widower brother Hugh, they 
say, is much more likely to wed. Andrew Martin is another 
of the gilded youth who seems deeply smitten and intent 
upon wedlock. 'Tis said Harry Simpkins left an aching 
heart behind when he set sail for Alaska last week with 
Talbot Clifton. 

* # * 

The two sisters-in-law (the Mesdames Crocker) are ap- 
parently as far apart as the poles, though the distance in 
reality lies between Castle Crags and Burlingame. The 
old saw which says, "two of a trade never agree," was 
not more true than that in a small circle two women, am- 
bitious of social distinction as leaders therein, cannot hope 
to do so. The result will be that separate cliques will form 
and "sassiety'' will rush into both. 

* * * 

On dit, the Hobart wedding will not take place until the 
Christmastide. so that the uewly-wedded pair may enter 
the new 3'ear together. Many of the young lady's friends 
hoped that during the visit here of Walter Hobart at this 
time a brilliant society wedding would help to enliven the 
summer season, but those on the inside say otherwise. 

# * * 

Since Miss McKinstry snubbed officious encroaches at 
San Mateo and cast her spurs over on the Burlingame re- 
serve, all are wondering if Jack Casserley was the attrac- 
tion, or was that only pro inn. in order that the Santa 
Cruz millionaire should come to time. 

* * * 

Among the transplanted California girls enjoying the 
present season in London is Miss Eugenia MeLane. one of 
our fairest native daughters, the young lady having first 
seen the light of day when her father, the late Charles 
MeLane, was a resident of San Francisco. 

* # * 

The many friends on the Pacific Coast of charming Miss 
Anna Ruger will hear with interest that she is enjoying a 
tour of Europe under most favorable auspices. 



Miss Holbrook had a narrow escape from death a few 
days ago at Castle Crags. Winding her way along a steep 
and narrow mountain road, her horse became frightened 
and unmanageable, and backed to the brink of a steep 
ravine, when, with great presence of mind, she withdrew 
her foot from the stirrup, gathered her habit up, and 
jumped, just in time, from death. Her horse fell thirty 
feet below, until caught by staunch trees. When found he 
was past recovery. There was great rejoicing upon her 
return to the Tavern, and she has since enjoyed being the 

heroine of the season. 

* * * 

Notwithstanding the rain there were good times enjoyed 
by several of the house parties over the Fourth. Down at 
San Mateo the Lents had bushels of fun for their friends, 
Tera MeGrew proving a host in himself. Mrs. Jimmy 
Robinson's hay party and charades afforded an opportun- 
ity for a delightful time. The Van Winkles had their big 
house crammed with pretty girls, and an engagement is 
about to be announced as a result of the Tompkins's hospi- 
tality. Grandma Hort has now an excellent opportunity 
of entertaining her friends on the veranda. 
# * * 

The beautiful Williams sisters quite carried off all honors 
at the Charity Tableaux given at the Mount Tamalpais 
Academy. While of Eastern birth, California has claimed 
them as her own from infancy, and would indeed be loath 
to give them up. So that charming Eastern man had bet- 
ter move along unless he wishes a torrent of abuse heaped 
upon his head. At the Portrait Exhibition the photo- 
graphs of these two beautiful young women created no end 
of admiration among the critics. 

* * * 

On dit that Birdie Rutherford, Mrs. George Crocker's 
daughter, will be a debutante this coming winter, and that 
the big mansion on the hill will be the scene of many a 
brilliant entertainment. Mrs. Crocker's past entertain- 
ments have left such pleasant remembrances that those 
who were fortunate in having been her guests will look for- 
ward with delight to those next winter. In the meantime 
Birdie is nowhere, and mamma still holds the reins of belle- 
ship. 

* * # 

Pretty Edith Findley is having no end of fun down at 
Del Monte, as the guest of the Will Barnes ; her's is in- 
deed a case of sweet amiability holding ' its own against 
many odds. By continual perseverence she has become 
quite an adept at swimming, and bids fair to being a rival 
of Mrs. George Crocker in that line. 

Don't fail to chew Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum after 
meals. Indigestion fades before it. 

There is no purer or better brand of Kentucky Bourbon Whisky 
than the Argonaut, kept by E. Martin & Co.. of 411 Market street, 
who are the Pacific Coast agents. It is a favorite for medicinal pur- 
poses, and is said to be the finest in the market. This firm is also 
agent for the celebrated J. F. Cutter brand of Kentucky Bourbon, 
which h:is stood the test of years. 



Boord & Son, 



LONDON, England. 




■ Cat and Barrel" Brand 

has i„, ,, h< ust '"/ Boord 



OLD TOM GIN, 
ORANGE BITTERS. 

ROYAL HIGHLAND WHISKY, 
IRISH MALT WHISKY, 
LIQUEUR GINGER BRANDY, 
OLD JAMAICA RUM, and 



London dogk Fale Sherry 

Iij tiises of li Bottles 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

Sole Agents. 314 Sacramento street, S. P. 



Jul;. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«3 



Heald's Business Gniieae 

GRADUATES 
Year Ending June 30, 1895. 

;. nrTtoua year- 
numb. - 

unit men abli 
band and as»l«>t 'in bookk, partleu- 

I s who, 
from various ho tinal 

-..ry (,>r graduation 

marked with 
■ mploymt-nt 

Business Department. 

Jerry C. Snyder Wabnska, N.v. 

Samuel W. Hannuiu College City, Cal. 
•Jacob Weil. ... Modesto. Cal. 

Leonardo. Rentier Forest Hill. Cal. 

Kalph K. Wright City 
•Samuel flitter ... Sutter Creek, Cal. 
•Kitiie Campbell Oroville. Cat. 

•Alice E. Munroe ... City 

Elizabeth Snyder Mason Valley. Nev. 

•Frank .T. Neer San Jacinto. Cal. 

•Win. J. Itohrer City 

Lloyd M. Scott City 

Richard M. Barry City 

Alia Line Williams. Cat. 

■Clarence Hove Newton. Miss. 

•Jos. .1 Bradley Marysville. Cal. 

Ichi Yokovama Kagoshinia, Japan. 

F. F. Gros'si Walnut Grove, Cal. 

•A. W. Newman ...City 

James S Kelley Eugene, Or. 

Rosa L. Kelly " ,. San Luis Obispo, Cal. 

Scott H. Stewart . Citv 

•Geo. A. Riehl San Jose, Cal. 

•Henry B. Ktthls ... City 
•Herbert L. Cook City 

Jose G. Mnnterro Mexico 
nVii. H. Hilton Lvnden, Wash. 

Olive Sanborn City 

•Louisa A. Pierron. . .City 
•Arthur Higgins City 

Geo. C Hansen San Rafael, Cal. 

Ann- Bennett City 

•Frank L. Thompson .Sonoma. Cal. 

Walter G. De Luca. . City 

D. M. Mclntyre Greenville, Cal, 

D. J. Counihan City 

• Burnett Woods Berkeley, Cal. 

Addie J. De Luca — City 
•Ella B. Glazier City 

EHa J. Lamb Franktown, Nev. 

•Frank B. Cavarly . City 

Mary E. Concannon Livermore. Cal. 

Victor A. Boell Oakland, Cat. 

•Colin Wilson Oakland, Cal. 

•Ernest Melius Sacramento, Cal. 

•Annie F. Jones City 

•Bessie B Baxley Oakland, Cal. 

•Frank Messner Oakland, Cal. 

Nellie M. Breslin City 

•Maggie E. Hurley Virginia, Nev. 

Fred C. Waters City 

♦Harla E. Hobbs Marysville, Cal. 

•Wm. Schwartz Napa, Cal. 

Arthur A. Lelevier. . Citv 
•Lillian M. McKibben Oakland, Cal. 

Chas. Learned City 

Martin Salm San Rafael, Cal. 

•Christine Dall City 

Mamie B. Kelly City 

*V. L. Arnaud City 

•Fred W. Roeding . . City 

•Harry Levison City 

•Genaro Woolrich Tehuantepec. Mex. 

•Douglas Ledbetter . .King City, Cal. 

Mamie Sullivan City 

Walter A. Barle Victoria, B. C. 

•Thos. Donnellan City 

•Nora V. Hurley Virginia City, Nev. 

•J. F. Bullwinkel City 

•H. C. Rowley Alameda, Cal. 

Nellie A. Smith Oakland, Cal. 

•Moses M. Getz City 

»G. B. Gianelli Stockton, Cal. 

•Wm. J.Tormey Vallejo, Cal. 

•Lucius Safford Auburn, Cal. 

•Geo J. Dupuy City 

•Rene Dumont City 

•A. P. Anderson Bolinas, Cal. 

•Henry G. Plageman City 

Edw. Lahl City 

David Makepeace Guatemala. C. A. 

W. S Fredericks St. Michael's, Alaska 

•Winifred J. Hilton. Lynden, Wash. 
Maggie L. Murray ... Petalurna, Cal. 



•Eleanor Phillip!! Oakland, Cal, 
Minnie rXafferon Virginia City, Nev. 
Harry K Oonltj Moore's Flat. Cal. 

•!,*onard R Downer Martlnei, Cal, 
■Franklin J. Williams. Vallejo, Cal 
•Newlon Hissmger City 
Emily BaUgDUM) City. 
•Julius Baltnonsohn City 
•Fre.i W. Prifllng Westport, Cal 

'Christina Jorgansen City 
Chas E. Foster uphir. Placer Co. 

•Otto 0. Hess City 

HttgoJ. Hippen Saii Mateo 
Amelia Dumonl City 

Margaret Smith San Kafael, Cul 

"William Bogen . . City 

•James L. Emigb Oakland, Cal 
•William Badgalap] City 
Benjamin Sheyer .. City 
•Chas. Staude ' . . City- 
Mrs c. M. Williams City 
Fred W. Loch . . Oakland, Cal 

William P. Mee City 

■David Britton Wrights, Cal 

Herbert W. Welch City 

Alice Donovan City 

•Charlotte Shine . . .City 
Rebecca Armstrong Byron, Cal. 

B. E. Patchette Fisherman's Bay, Cal 

M. L. Schweinitzer . St. Helena, Cal. 

Manuel Ramirez Guatemala, C. A. 

Chester Hemenway. Winters, Cal. 
•Rose H. Schubert. . . . Half Moon Bay, Cal. 

Robert Gallegos Mission San Jose, Cal 

Fred R. Walker City 

•John Nute City 

•Beuj. Boas City 

Georgia Emerson ..Seminary Park 

Samuel Cereni Bodega 

•Geo. W. Byrnes City 

•John F. Anderson. . .City 

•Lottie Hopper Oakland, Cal. 

Chas. M. Dufficy. . . San Rafael, Cal. 
William Wolf skill.. .Copala, Mexico 

•Mary A. Moore Oakland, Cal. 

FredC. Feudner Dixon, Cal. 

Newland McFarland San Bernardino, Cal. 

Jos. M. Inman Bishop, Cal. 

Alto. V. De Roche. . Belmont, Cal. 
S.J. Domeniconi ...City 

Addison Barret Alameda, Cal. 

•Morris Evans Ohico, Cal. 

Phil. R. Whelan San Leandro, Cal. 

•Frank F. Buettel, Jr. City 

David V. Cuneo City 

Nellie M. Holleran. .City 
•William F. Kutter. . .City 

William E. Nixon Salinas, Cal. 

Jas. T. N ixon Salinas, Cal. 

•Philmoire Renaud. . .Tulare, Cal. 

Royal Cud worth City 

M. F. Burris Traver, Cal. 

Walter Megarry Vallejo, Cal. 

William H. Gray Martinsville, Cal. 

Nelson Freund Napa Junction, Cal. 

Felix Russell Madison, Cal. 

•Mamie L. Doyle Oakland, Cal. 

Dora Cronau Oakland, Cal. 

Percy Lishman Honolulu, H. I. 

Barney Berger Honolulu, H.I. 

Fred Stahl Pleasanton, Cal. 

•Jas. E. Bowe West Berkeley. Cal. 

Katie Cox Alameda Co., Cal. 

Ernest A. Duveneck.City 
Fred Kronenberg. . . .City 

•Jos. Gildmacher City 

•Oswald Mish City 

Emma B. Jenkins Rosendale, Wis. 

Carson C. Hansen. . . .San Rafael, Cal. 
Angelo Bernardasci. .Cayucos, Cal. 
William C. Zinkand . San Rafael, Cal. 
Anna L. J. Lindsay. Oakland, Cal. 

Jos. J. Quale Routier's Station, Cal 

•Jos. Van Winkle Napa, Cal. 

John A. Kettman .... San Jose, Cal. 
Marie E. Ottesgard. Salinas, Cal. 

T. S. Crellin Oakland, Cal. 

•ChasG Montgomery. City 
Bertha L Baumberger.. San Leandro, Cal. 

Ada 1. Newbegin City 

Jos. G. Wagner City 

NellaM. Gore Vallejo, Cal. 

Porter Roberts City 

Wm. B. Hudson Marysville, Cal. 

Chas E. Hilton Modesto, Cal. 

Frank M. Lyle Cloverdale, Cal. 

F. I. Pagnello Cedarville, Cal. 

John M. Ratto City 

Andrew Abrott West Berkeley, Cal. 

Clark Duncan City 

Mathew G. Russi Pacheco, Cal. 

Edward P. Canney . . . Port Wine, Cal. 

Wm. H. Newell City. 

Miss Annie Brown . Redwood City, Cal. 



Minnie Dunning Modesto. Cal. 
I ewolynn F. stark- Modesto, 
Herman It. 0. Quasi City 

City 

', . King Hon. .lulu, II. 1. 

'. de la Idle l'arii 

Lena McKinnon Oakland, Cal. 

Graduates marked witli a star are in 
positions. 

Shorthand Department, 
•j ... u Binning 
i. Bell. 

Balon 

•William i" Crook ... lion, .lulu 
Irani Uklah, Cal 

•Herbert L Oook City 

. .... City 
Qaston .Petalurna, Cal. 

H Oram Fresno, Cal. 

■MuudGets ciiy 

•LvmamB Hall Walnut Grove, Cal. 

•Huilo E Hobbs I lltj 

•Minnie Huns City 

■William W Iiiirir Napa. Cal. 

K Jaeger Honolulu, H. I. 

•I.la Manning Oakland, Cal. 

•Gertrude Murphy Oakland, Cal. 

•Aiiee E Munroe City 

Lillian Oakley City 

Anna w Rutherford. .City 

.1' N.,1,' Hvau City 

Minna IJ Shanks Castlewood, S. D. 

George Schocntleld ...City 

•Ella Solomon..: City 

•otto Scheerer City 

-HI hi Thomas Mohava, Arizona 

•Kittie Tyrrell City 

Daisy Wakelee Long Beach, Cal. 

MaryE. Whelan City 

Ella Finn City. 

•Maggie Hurley Viiginia City, Nev. 

"Nora V. Hurley Virginia City, Nev. 

♦Louise A. Pierron City 

•Christine Dall City 

•William Rattigan City 

•Ray Armstrong City 

•Alex. B. Allison 

*V. L. Arnaud City 

George W- Bryant City 

•David D. Britton City 

•BessieB. Baxley Oakland, Cal. 

Fred W. Birlem San Quentin, Cal. 

•Annie J . Campbell Nevada City . 

*Berdie Cotmreich City 

•Leslie C. Coggins City 

•J B. Didier Alameda, Cal 

•Rene Dumont City 

•Grace R. Gartley Martinez, Cal. 

•Milton M. Getz City 

•Ella B. Glazier City 

•Genevieve Hallinan. . . -City 
•Lottie Hopper Oakland, Cal 

Emily Haughton City 

Nellie M. Holleran City 

•Helena Henderson City 

•Amanda Heusch Sacramento, Cal. 

•Eugenia T. Haley West Berkeley, Cal. 

Minnie Hafferon Virginia City, Nev. 

Mrs. Florence Keith. .City 
•William Kutter City 

Edna Lang Alameda, Cal. 

•Margaret J. McDonald. City 

•Jennie Quigley Tacoma, Wash. 

•Bessie I. Robinson Novato, Cal. 

*H. C. Rowley Alameda, Cal. 

•Wallace Rutherford. . . . 

•Julius Salmonsohn Los Angeles, Cal. 

•Hattie Samuel Wheatland, Cal 

Kate Sullivan City 

•Mabel E. Vance Alameda. Cal 

•Keren Weaver Oakland, Cal 

•Christine Jorgensen — City 
•Charles G. Montgomery City 

Nellie M. Breslin City. 

Edna C. Chadbourne. . .Pleasanton, Cal 

Dora Cronan Oakland, Cal 

•Mamie Doyle Oakland, Cal 

Amelie Dumont City 

Addie D. De Luca City 

Georgia Emerson Seminary Park. 

Fred J. Loch Oakland, Cal 

May McEntee Berkeley., Cal 

Jennie Matthews Gilroy, Cal 

Maggie L. Murray Petalurna, Cal 

Mollie G . O'Neill San Rafael, Cal 

Marie E. Ottesgard .. Salinas, Cal 

Kittie Scanlon City 

Margaret Smith San Rafael, Cal 

May T. Stanford City 

Lettie M . Tucker City 

Florence Younglove .. City 

William C. Zinkand .. .San Rafael, Cal. 

Anne Thing City 

•Graduates marked with a star are in positions 
Telegraphy Department. 

•Arthur Brown Walnut Grove, Cal. 

•F. W. Gale City 

Leslie Coggins Butte Co. 

Fred Birlem San Quentin, Cal 

J. Schmidt City 

Fred Rachenberger City 

Jennie Matthews Santa Cruz, Cal 

Lillian Preston Napa, Cal 

Kate Scanlan City 

*A. L Long Washington. 

J . Gildmacher City 

I. Boydston City. 

•Graduates marked with a star are in positions. 



14 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895. 




A Sale Now Buyers are beginning to crop up for Cali- 

For forma gold mines, and small-priced pros- 

Gold Mines, pects which show up well are taken up 
readily by people in this city, barked In- 
expert opinion, who were never before known to invent in 
this class of property. The success Of others who have 
made legitimate mining the baseof their immense fortunes. 
has commenced to attract attention, and the result is an 
activity in the mining regions almost equal to that which 
followed the arrival of the pioneer gold seekers. Among 
sales to local residents during the week was the Moyle 
Drift Gravel .Mine in Calaveras County. This property is 
considered a highly promising one. and the returns from 
two hundred tons of gravel washed between June 2nd and 
June -23rd. amounted to $1222.33 in bullion, which sold at 
$20 an ounce. This did not include the fine gold which had 
passed into the tailings. The new purchasers contemplate 
equipping the mine with the necessary hoisting plant, and 
a mill which will enable the company to work at all sea 
of the year. Another mine bonded on a working proposition 
is the Rocky Bar. from which some rich returns in gravel 
have been taken. In quartz properties the old Eagle Bird, of 
Nevada County, a rich gravel deposit, and a well-known 
Tuolumne property are now in the hands of Eastern capi- 
talists, with every likelihood that they will be sold. The 
transfer of the interest in the Pioneer Mine owned by 
Mr. Davis, the sale of which was reported in the News 
Letteh last week, has been made. The remainder, be- 
longing to the Fair estate, will pass to the Boston people 
as soon as the Court approves the sale. 

Clarence Smith Something must be brewing in the min- 
im ing line when all the old-time operators. 

Harness Again, conspicuous by their absence for years, 
are turning their steps again toward 
the Golden State. Clarence Smith is one of the latest to 
drop in quietly and then hie himself away without taking 
much trouble to hunt up old friends. In fact it was news 
to a great many that he had been here, and they only 
heard of it when he was gone. It is said that he was only 
taking a peep at the old Hartfeld mine, in Plumas County, 
which was supposed to have been sold a year or so ago in 
London. We should have thought that his old friend 
Senator Jones could have told him enough about the prop- 
erty to have served him without the trouble and expense 
of a trip West, which has not evidently had much attrac- 
tion for him of late. The Senator thought he wanted the 
mine badly enough at one time to send an expert there, 
and that report must be in evidence somewhere yet. as it 
is not so very long ago. Now that both Smith and Janin 
have had their investigation, it will be interesting to hear 
eventually how all the opinions agree, as it is not likely 
that any tyro looked the matter up for the old Comstock 
magnate, who generally knows a good thing when he 
is it. 

Comstock The market opened firm after the holidays, 
Mining and business has been more active ever since. 
Shares. Work is now well under wayon the Brunswick 
lode, acquired by the Comstock companies. 
and two incline shafts arc now going down, while a tunnel 
is being run in that portion owned by Savage. Dealers 
on the street feel very enthusiastic over the prospects, 
and this can be accepted as one of the best signs of the 
times. A stock market is one of the urgent necessities of 
the hour in this city. A good active market on Pine street 
will put millions in circulation, and that means much to 
business men in all branches of trade. The only assess- 
ments levied during the week" were 5 cents on Utah, 25 
cents on Potosi, and 2.") cents on Ophir. It is likely that 
an announcement will be made before long that some new 
work of importance will be undertaken at the south end. 

THE second annual convention of the New York State 
Bankers' Association has just been held at Saratoga 



The California 

Safe 

Deposit Company. 

with the law. The 
which aggregate 



Springs. The 

character. 



proceedings were of a highly interesting 



A Gigantic The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society is 
Banking one of the financial institutions of San Fran- 
Institution. Cisco to which citizens can point with pride. 
It is a proper representative of the wealth 
and prosperity of the community. Managed since tin' day 
of its incorporation by conservative men of wealth and 
brains, its growth has been steady on a basis of solidity. 
which has made the very name of the bank a synonym for 
strength allied with security. The latest statement of the 
assets of this financial gianf shows the astounding aggre- 
gate of $33,597,283.40. Of this amount over $31,000,000 
are accredited todeposits alone Of this sum $23,749,804.25 
is represented by loans on real estate, the bulk of which 
consists of the best class of city property. The large sum 
of $5,852,000 is invested in United States Bonds, and. be- 
sides this, nearly $2,000,000 more of local securities are 
scheduled among the assets. These consist of such gilt- 
edged securities as In H ids of the Market Street Cable, Spring 
Valley Water Works. Sutter Street Railway. City of San 
Jose, and the City of San Luis Obispo. The bank building, 
which is one of the handsomest edifices to be found any- 
where, is valued at $576,224.10, besides which other city 
property is set down al $13,856.26. The cash on hand is 
estimated at $1,261, 675. 62. The reserve fund now amounts 
to $2,504,641.77. James R. Kelly, a business man of ster- 
ling reputation in this city, which has literally grown up 
around him. is now President of the Hibernia. and Robert 
J. Tobin, one of its original founders, is its Secretary. 

The semi-annual statement of the 
California Safe Deposit Company 
showing its financial condition on July 
1st last, is now in file in accordance 
resources in the Trust Department, 
$6,605,976.52, consist of high-class 
securities of all descriptions, a large proportion being se- 
cured by mortgage on city property. The total assets of 
the bank itself amount to $2,924,453.37, of which over 
$350,000 is cash on hand. The real estate owned by the 
bank is valued at $843,99£. The loan account on real 
estate and bonds amounts to 41,570,575.35. 

New York In Wall street securities speculation shows 
Stock the effects of the summer flight of well-to-do 
Market. people from the city. There was a further 
shrinkage in the volume of dealings this week 
and fractional recessions. Loudon was not very noticeable 
in the market, sales from that quarter being represented 
by a few lots of Louisville and St. Paul. The general mar- 
ket continues to bear a tired aspect, but the recessions 
seem so light that they may be recovered in a short time 
should anything encouraging be brought to the front. 
Sugar fell to 105, but has recovered 41 of it. Beading is 
strong on vague rumors of efforts to bring the anthracite 
companies into an agreement. The shares were helped 
considerably by the publication of a statement to that ef- 
fect. Whisky "is holding strong. It is clearly seen that 
somebody is ready to pick up the stock at every conces- 
sion of 5, but the' short interest has been largely increased 
by this week's operation. Over $45,000,000 of new stocks 
and bonds have just been added to the Stock Exchange 
lists for dealings. 

Local Stock The following local dividends will be paid on 
Dividends. the 15th inst. : Bank of California, quar- 
terly, $3; San Francisco Gas. 35c: Edison 
Light and Power, 66sc. ; Oakland Gas. 20c: Pacific Tele- 
phone and Telegraph, 30c. 1 Sunset Telephone and Tele- 
graph, 20c; and the Hutchinson Sugar Plantation. The 
Commercial Publishing Company has declared a dividend 
of 8 per cent. The American Banking and Trust Com- 
pany is now paying a dividend of 2 per cent, for the half 
year. Business in the Stock and Bond Exchange is rather 
quiet just now. as it usually is at this season of the year. 
but prices show no weakness to speak of in any direction. 
A Los Angeles Articles of incorporation of the Big 
Mining Company. Horn Gold Mining Company were filed 
this week in the office of the County 
Clerk of Los Angeles County. The nominal capital is 
$2,000,000, which is all subscribed. The directors are: L. 
W. Blinn. Hon. Erskine M. Ross, Senator Stephen M. 
White. D. D. Ross. W. C. Read. D. A. Macncil. Jam 
Melius, and Frank Moore. 



July 13, 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 




■Hear the Criir" • What thcdertlart thou?" 
Nat w!U play Ibedertl. sir. with > 



FAITH in tin- Huly Scriptures, which record the plagues 
gypt, will be refreshed in Delaware presently. 
.hi Maguire announces that the single-taxers of 

bole United states have determined to move in force 
on the little State, which has only bflU the population of 
San Francisco, and try to win a majority at the polls there 
for their scheme. The single-tax is all right but the 
single-tax is one thing and the single-taxer another. He 
has a large, bright, and earnest eye, an utter indifference 
if the man whose button-hole he captures, 
and it is believed that knowledge of him suggested the 

graph to Eili.son. When he gets to Delaware in large 
numbers and feels that time is too valuable to waste any 
of it in sleep, the inhabitants may be driven to vote for 
the single-tax in the hope of inducing the single-taxers' 
departure, but it is more likely that crimes of violence will 
increase, that riots will ensue, that the militia will be 
called out. and Federal troops ordered into the hapless 
commonwealth to protect the mails and inter-state com- 
merce. 

SURPRISE is felt in the newspaperoffices here because 
a young man named Hinckley, recently a reporter in 
Chicago, has come to California, turned religious, and 
entered the Congregational ministry. This surprise be- 
trays a lack of knowledge of Chicago. The change from 
that city to this is quite enough to make anybody believe 
in the goodness of God, and to worship and serve him 
thankfully evermore. That the convert should be a re- 
porter is still less astonishing. Pursuit of that calling, 
in Chicago, induces an ardent faith in the pit, and, that 
faith once fixed, what more natural than to take every 
possible precaution against falling into it ? The News 
Letter welcomes Brother Hinckley to the fold, and trusts 
that in him it will find an earnest and efficient co-worker. 

HENRY SMITH, described by the newspapers as an 
old and hitherto respected resident of Mountain View 
and vicinity, following the occupation of a rancher, disap- 
peared on Monday last. He vanished on the same day 
that his wife gave birth to triplets. The reporters found 
him, however, and ascertained that he is fifty-five years 
old. but is not feeling very well. As he is a resident of 
Santa Clara county, Mr. Shortridge considers that another 
triumph has been achieved for the Call. Mrs. Smith, 
though younger than her husband, is not a new woman, 
and even the babies are of the same old kind. 

JOAQUIN MILLER, usually one of the least sensori- 
ous of men, broke out in last Sunday's Examiner 
against Bret Harte because the latter, as the poet has 
learned, dresses like a dude and looks like an Englishman 
of the swell sort. Bret L arte has his faults, certainly, 
but one of them is not his abandonment of the high Sierra 
habit of going about like a wild man and shying at the 
sight of a bathtub. Mr. Miller has fallen into the distress- 
ing waters of error. This is no longer '49, and it is not 
necessary now to be unwashed and hairy in order to be in 
the swim. 

EMMANUEL Baptist Church, of which Theodore Dur- 
rant is still a member in good standing, is to be re- 
opeued for service on Sunday next — admission by ticket 
only. Secure your reserved seats early and avoid the rush. 
Pastor Gibson is not much of a preacher, but he has busi- 
ness ability, which is better. As success attends his efforts 
to rehabilitate the church it may be expected that he will 
add to its attractions — say by opening an Eden Musee in 
the library, with wax figures of poor Blanche Lamont 
and Minnie Williams for a starter. 

GOVERNOR Budd seems to be gaming the ill will of the 
reporters. There never was a Governor of California 
who didn't, and there never will be until we have one who 
shall take the reporters into his confidence and let them 
print all his State secrets. Business is business, and a Gov- 
ernor who attends to his interferes with that of the young 
gentlemen of the press. 



TH E death of the sea Ion Men Butler i- more regretted 
in San Francisco than that ol many "a prominent 
citizen " who had no attraction for the multitude. 
Ben saw a good deal of life from his perch opposite 11 

ClitT House, which during his day and general ion was puri- 
fied by lire. And. as the veteran chief of the herd, he died 

full of years and honors. The CW/ says he weighed two 
tons, and the Exnmina says one. but Little discrepancies 
like these creep into the biographies of famous men. and 
the matter of avoirdupois is no longer of any concern to 

THE shaving and hair-cutting contest al the picnic of 
the Barbers' 1 nion promises to be very interesting. 
A number of subjects from Butchertown, Colma, and other 
suburban resorts, who have not had their hair cut for 

months or years, will be specially operated on. and some 

of the toughest beards in the State will be offered to the 

razor. It is not true that Police Judge Campbell will 
occupy one of the chairs,iso the friends of his whiskers 
need not be at all alarmed. 

THE Rev. Mr. Gibson says that "the mother thinks her 
smooth-faced boy knows nothing but what she has 
taught him.'' He must imagine that the mothers teach 
their young how to play craps, hookey, and baseball, and 
how to smoke cigarettes, for what a fourteen-year-old boy 
in San Francisco does not know can be safely put on ice. 
Mr. Gibson, you are not fly, but keep on cultivating "people 
younger than yourself.'' They can give you lots of pointers. 

WITH the peculiar fat-wittedness which is Oakland's 
special glory, that burg has elected a real estate 
dealer to the office of Chief of Police. His special fitness 
so far seems to be that he is possessed of an unholy desire 
to prevent any one from getting a drink after midnight. 
Otherwise he is not supposed to know a handcuff from an 
Oregon boot, or how to button his uniform. 

THEY hobnob in secret. Together they dine. 
Their little political games 
Are fostered 'mid fumes of tobacco and wine 

And cafe noir cognac flames. 
A Damon and Pythias sort of combine 
'Twixt Adolph the guileless, the ever benign, 
And the gubernatorial James. 

THE newspapers have made, at various times, a great 
to-do about the theft of the Fair will. But as Supe- 
rior Judge Slack has said, the original will is by no means 
necessary to the Probate Court. A duly certified copy 
answers every purpose. No doubt the thief thought he 
was making a great haul when he purloined the document, 
and is correspondingly chagrined to find it going begging 
at a small figure. 

THE local Institute of Applied Christianity has been 
considering the question, "Is Socialism Practicable?" 
The Institute may next discuss the practicability of the 
millenium. Just as soon as selfishness shall have been en- 
tirely eliminated from human nature, the millenium and 
socialism may come in, hand in hand. As yet, however, 
the old Adam seems to have a firm grip on mankind in 
general. 

IF the authorities in Texas still persistently refuse to 
allow Corbett and Fitzsimmons to slug on terra Jirma, it 
is believed that a large balloon will be built and that the 
fight, hitherto all wind, will appropriately be brought off 
in the air. There is enough gas in either contestant to in- 
flate the biggest air-ship ever devised, and a knock-out at 
one thousand feet above the earth would probably be de- 
cisive. 

SINCE last Sunday there has been a noticeable falling 
off in the loquacity of the free silver orators. On that 
day a new daughter was born to President Cleveland's 
wife. The connection between this event and the machina- 
tions of Wall street is not yet apparent, but it will soon be 
discovered. Then the eloquence will be resumed, and we 
shall all feel at home again. 

THE genial Mr. Bierce is receiving well-earned congratu- 
lations on the suicide of David Lesser Lezinsky, rival 
poet. 

THE Home for the Feeble-Minded at Glen Ellen is 
crowded, and yet there are many still at large. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895. 







LADY JEUNE continues to surprise London society by 
the frankness of her opinions on the social evil. In an 
article just published by her, she says it is absurd to hold 
man responsible to the same moral code as woman and 
that society should forgive man's transgressions, owing to 
his stronger animal passions, when woman should be 
tabooed if she falls from grace. Woman has, she says, a 
higher ideal of chastity than man and it would be degrad- 
ing to her to place her standard of morality on a level with 
that of her male companion who is, naturally, subject to 
more temptation for which allowances should be made. 

There is a significant and thoughtful article in the 
Nineteenth Century on "The Mussulmans of India and the 
Armenian Question." It is a gentle reminder to England 
that while "advising" the Sultan and insulting him 
generally, it may be well to remember that the Sultan has 
millions of spiritual subjects in India; that those subjects 
have a free press and that they might, some day, resent 
British interferance in Turkish affairs. It is an old threat. 

"Forward House," by William Scoville Chase is a so- 
called "romance" in which pirates, smugglers, fighting, 
and all the old time "properties" of the last century are 
appropriated for incidents to make a book relating to the 
Atlantic seaboard of to-day. The author who could be- 
lieve that praise of such a book was deserved would 
swallow a dose of flattery though it were laid on with 
a trowel. 

"The Elements of Navigation" is a small book that 
ought to be popular in every seaport in the country. The 
value of the book lies in the ease with which it teaches the 
use of the compass, charts, sextants, chronometer, cur- 
rents, and it is just the book that is wanted by ocean 
travelers, amateur sailors, naval malitiameu. and all who 
"go down to the sea in ships" in an unprofessional way. 

In the July Century ProfesserSloane calls Napoleon "the 
great deserter " because he left his army in Egypt for the 
purpose of pushing his fortune in Paris. He also speaks 
of Napoleon's " shriveled conscience" because he abandoned 
Kleber to his fate, and he dwells on Napoleon's alleged 
suggestion to the surgeons that his plague-stricken 
soldiers, whom he left in Egypt, be poisoned by opium, 

The Chinese have another eulogist in the person of Dr. 
6. E. Morrison, an Australian who traveled over much of 
China on foot and dressed as a Chinaman, pigtail and all. 
He agrees with Julian Ralph that the Chinese are 
courteous, hospitable, and uniformly kind. A few 
more travelers like Dr. Morrison and Julian Ralph will 
revolutionize our views of the Chinese character. 

" For Valour" is one of the most authentic accounts of 
heroic deeds ever issued from the press. It is a simple 
record of the achievements by which the owners of the 
" Victoria cross " won that much prized decoration. The 
wearers of the cross rank, the world over, as the most 
exclusive, of the exclusive, of the aristocracy of heroism, 
and the record of their deeds is intensely interesting. 

University and College men will read "Four Universi- 
ties" with a good deal of interest. The "Four Universi- 
ties" are Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and Columbia and all 
are vividly described. It is a skillfully written book and 
it shows the facts, and forces, which have shaped aud are 
shaping the intellectual activity of the Republic. 

" Juliet IrviDg aud the Jesuits," by T. Robinson Warren, 
is the story of the love of a good, and a beautiful Protests 
ant girl for a Catholic priest. The book lacks finish but it 
is chiefly interesting for its religious discussions which 
throw much light on many misunderstood phases of the 
Catholic religion. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Custer, the widow of the famous general, 
has just published a book, "Tenting on the Plains." It is 
vivid, graphic, and amusing, and as a faithful record of a 
soldier's life on the plains, it has never been surpassed by 
any wife, or widow, of a soldier in this country. 

Count Tolstoi has a new story called "Ivan the Fool " in 
the press. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 311 Sansome St. .... gan Francisco, Cal. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE 13 and 46 Threadneedle St., London 

SIMPSON, MACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St.. Liverpool 

FUERST BROS. & CO 3 and 4 Stone St., New York 



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Owners and Proprietors. 



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Office: Corner Grant ave. and 
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Entrance 14 Grant avenue. 



9:30 A m to 12 m 
2 to 4, 7 to 8 P M 



A. G. DEARDORFF, M. D. 

Residence: Baldwin Hotel. Telephone 5400. San Francisco, Cal. 

HENRY N. CLEMENT, 

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Rooms 13 and 14, fourth floor, Mills Building, S. P. Telephone No. 855. 

Dr. F. G. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 819 Market street 



Jul> 



FRANCISCO NEWS I.I TTER 



17 



A BOOK OF THE WEEK.* 



Bi 'KN . -ky. the gifted 

• r in mathemet -tl the si ene 

ning behind her ;i memoir and tbe record of a 

to that of her brilliant country - 
.111 anil child ol tbe - Marie Bashkirtseff. 

itorv of her life, written by herself, has already been 
shed, but added to thi* we now have her biography, 
her intimate friend, Anna Carlotta Lieffler, the 
•' Cajanello. The autobiography of her early 
childhood, published in l s '.in is one of the finest produc- 
ed modern Russian literature; and if this later account 
of her career, from sixteen years of aye to the time ol her 
death, laeks the artistic finish and burning realism which 
lend -11 much pathos to her own words, yet it tills a vacuum 
by holding Sonya Kovalevsky up before us painted in 
- and described by words ii.it her own. And From 
beginning to end this life, as told by herself or by her 
friend, is a sad one. Intensely interesting for all those 
who carefully gauge the development of woman on lines 
hitherto considered masculine, yet the life of this scientific 
pedant is like the wail of a lost spirit or the croon of a ban- 
shee, wailing for the past, moaning for opportunities to 
come no more, or telling the world to — Beware. The 
lightning strokes which lay bare the human soul in Sonya 
Kovalevsky's book, and the vivid portrayal of her life as 
told by the Duchess of Cajanello. reveal the New Woman 
as she has never been revealed before, except when Marie 
Bashkirtseff. almost for the first time in history, had the 
courage to present us with a woman self-revealed, and not 
the woman we read of in the tinsel romances of the past or 
the unreal biographies of the present hour. Unhappy 
from her childhood, this daughter of a Russian General 
grew up favored by fortune indeed, but estranged from 
those endearing expressions of affection which nature 
yearns for and which severe parents denied her even in her 
infancy. In all absence of affection she was the Cinderella 
of the family, and her parents lavished their affection on 
her eldest sister and her brother; and thus, in infancy, de- 
veloped that severity of manner, and spirited resolve 
which come from a belief that a wrong is being done just 
as surely as heat comes from fire. And in the reminiscence 
of her childhood she, in her autobiography, records a fact 
which is well worthy of note as she tells how, when she was 
about ten years of age, her father's house was being re- 
paired, and wall papers were being brought from St. Peters- 
burg. It so happened, however, that there was no wall 
paper for the nursery, and so it was papered with Ostra- 
gradski's lithographic course upon higher mathematical 
analysis, a survival of her father's student days. And it 
was thus that Sonya, or the " little Sophia," first formed 
a taste for those higher mathematical studies which gave 
her a world-wide fame before she was thirty. Victor Hugo, 
in that wonderful sketch of the battle of Waterloo, tells 
us how the fate of Europe hinged on the nod of a peasant 
guide who, on being asked by Napoleon if there was any 
obstacle to the advance of cavalry, shook his head in reply 
and so 2000 horses and 1500 men plunged into the sunken 
road at Ohain, and this was the beginning of the long list 
of disasters which determined the fate of the "Little Cor- 
poral " on that eventful day. And so the accident which 
prevented the father of Sonya Kovalevsky from papering 
the nursery may have helped in giving the 
world a lady winner of the Baudin Prize 
from the French Academy, which prize was 
doubled on account of the "extraordinary 
services " rendered by her to the cause of 
mathematical physics. But how was this 
girl to prosecute her studies of the great 
questions she had begun to learn from the 
papers on the nursery ? How go to school, 
to college, to the university? It was love 
for scientific research, not love of person, that 
solved that question, and she and Viadimir 
Kovalevsky determined to have a fictitious 
marriage — a marriage that would lend her 
his name and protection, but not share his 
bed, agreed to upon such a formula not un- 
common in Russia — and so she broke away 
from her father's latchets and thus found the 



' ir did ber father Rerio 
to the arrangement. I irnnf hisdnugh- 

ing ber and her 
"husband u>). ufl vers pledged to a fic- 

titious marriage. wlni h in Russian eyes is considered emi- 
nently respectable She was wry young. At sixteen she 

was received as a sli 1 at the Heidelberg University 

egan the study ol higher mathematics, and at the 
age "f twenty .•! ■ degrei of Doctor of 

Philosophy. Triumph followed triumph Imth for herself 
and for her "husband, with whom, however, at last she 
fell in love and married in earnest. Her works became the 
talk of the learned mi n of Europe, while his researches 

give him more than a 1 ontinental fame, and yet they were 

both unhappy. He was a kindly gentleman, this Viadimir 
Kovalevsky, but as shi rose to a realization of her fuller 
womanhood his love cooled, and. crossed and troubled, he 
ended his life, while she went abroad, and. still unhappy. 
continued to study with her, little daughter as her only 

companion. But at the zenith of her triumphs she 

said: '" I am wretched as a dog. Indeed, I think dogs, 
luckily for them, cannot be as wretched as people, and 
especially as women are capable of being." What a wail 

of despair this is. c ing from beneath the laurel wreath 

and phyrgian cap of liberty ! What a lesson may be learned 
from the despairing cry, uttered in another place, when 
she says : " In spite of my many successes I have been de- 
feated in my battle for happiness." Like the horizon it 
appeared to fade from her advances, and why ? Her am- 
bition was, like the author of the Cumedie Humaine, to be 
loved and celebrated, but she was celebrated and not loved 
with all her wealth of good disposition and manner. She 
tells us that it is a misfortune to have a talent for science, 
particularly for a woman, for science does not bring happi- 
ness, and to pursue science a woman has in a great meas- 
ure to abandon the one spot on earth where happiness sur- 
vived the Fall — the Home. But disobedient as she was, yet 
Sonya Kovalevsky was gentle and womanly, and while she 
fails to realize our ideals of woman's mission, yet we can- 
not but feel sympathy for her fate, and we prefer to let 
the curtain fall rather than speak unkindly of her memory. 
*"Sonya Kovalevsky." by the Duchess of Cajanello. 

Laughing Babies 
are loved by everybody. Those raised on the Gail Borden Eagle 
Brand Condensed Milk are comparatively free from sickness. Infant 
Health is a valuable pamphlet for mothers. Send your address for a 
copy to the New York Condensed Milk Company, New York. 



Children cutting teetb, and suffering from the various disorders 
incident thereto, need Steedman's Soothing Powders, 



Dr. H. W. Hdnsaker has removed his offices to 114 Geary street, up 
stairs, near Grant avenue. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 
Estate of CHARLES MEHRTENS, Deceased. 

No ticeis hereby given by the undersigned, A. C. Freese, administrator 
of the estate of Charles Mehrtens, deceased, to the Creditors of, and all 
persons-having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them with the 
necessary vouchers, within four months after the first publication of this 
notice, to the said A. C. Freese, administrator of said estate, at his office, 
room No. 9, 319 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal., the same being his place 
for the transaction of the business of the said estate in the City and County 
of San Francisco, State of California. A. C. FREESE, 

Administrator of the Estate of Charles Mehrtens, deceased. 

Dated at San Francisco, June 15, 1895. 

J. D. Sullivan, attorney for Administrator. 




SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jul}- 13, 1895. 



/> 






JUST at present the question occupying the minds of a 
Vast number of cyclists is the summer tour, a diver- 
sion predicted as about to be the amusement most in 
TOgue for this season. Especially among the fair devotees 
of the wheel will this novel and delightful mode of pleasure 
be in high favor. The Boston Globe has a very interest- 
ing article from which we clip the following-, as it is es- 
pecially applicable here and will be read with interest by 
cy.lers. It says: " In planning such a trip the first con- 
sideration is good company. A sensible, jolly married 
pair must be selected to play propriety: the rest of the 
party should be congenial, good-tempered and inured to 
the idea of roughing it. And what opportunities are 
offered on a cycling tour for the youthful masculine and 
feminine fancy to have full play! The coaching tours 
abroad so proverbial as prolific in matrimonial results are 
not in it with the cycling tour. The mounts, the leisurely 
shins, the walks up hill, the long rests in some shady spot, 
the general gaiety arising from the unchecked flow of fun 
and good spirits, as well as from all sorts of amusing ac- 
cidents and incidents happening along the way — every 
condition is favorable to the promotion of that "sweetest 
thing in life," particularly if a tandem cycle is used. 

Too large a party is not desirable. It is wisest to limit 
the number to six or eight. 

The next matter of importance is the choice of a route. 
Shall it be near at hand and of a few days' run, or an ex- 
tended journey in some distant portion of the country? 

Iu determining on a tour it pays to have one member of 
the party join the organization now familiar by name to 
all good cyclers, the League of American Wheelmen. The 
fee is very small, the advantages of membership immense. 
In the first place its "tour book." maps, road books and 
handbooks are absolutely reliable and full of information 
as to tours in various parts of the country, the most 
popular roads, their character and condition, hotel rates 
and accommodations, with numberless other points. All 
members are allowed reduced hotel rates. 

The cost per day and per capita depends entirely 011 the 
purse and requirements of the party. The best hotels, 
with no expense spared on the transportation of machines, 
luggage, refreshments or other comforts, will levy a tax 
of $5 daily. The economical pleasure-seeker can accom- 
plish the same results for si or less. A bed at a small 
hotel or a farmhouse, though not always downy, answers 
the purpose to the tired but happy tourist too placid and 
sleepy to be disturbed; while fresh eggs and milk with a 
"piece of pie" in addition can be had for a song. 

The journey once settled upon, it is well for the feminine 
tourists contemplating it to prime themselves on several 
important points. She should practice going 10 miles 
farther each day. beginning with ten miles for a start. 
The great trouble with women is that they are apt to 
overdo at first. Another item is practice on a narrow 
path, as country roads are often rough, and the side path 
must be res. irted to. She should also be conversant with the 
construction and working of her bicycle incase of accident. 

The next thing iu order is, what shall she wear? If she 
wishes to be a howling swell she cannot do better for cool 
weather than order a suit the exact counterpart of that 
worn by one of the crack wheelwomen of New York's 
Michaux cycle club. 

This was called the smartest costume at the club. The 
skirt is cut from dust-colored English covert cloth, quite 
full, reaching to the shoe tops and lined with scarlet silk. 
The waist is a short, tight fitting Norfolk jacket lined with 
satin, and has a standing collar fastened with a storm 
button. A double row of small round buttons, made of 
the cloth set in horn, extends down the length of the waist, 
one row serving to fasten it. The sleeves are full, but not 
stiffened. 

The undergarments should be of black silk, and a short 
silk petticoat is worn. A smart little tam-o'shanter, with 
a scarlet wing stuck jauntily on one side completes this 
fetching rig, while the gloves should be of heavy kid or 
dog skin, very loose." 



Helical Tube Premiers 



Highest Grade, The Finest, 
Lightest and Strongest 




Depot, Salesroom, and Cycleby. 
East entrance to Panhandle of Park. 



Send all orders to 



BiGijcle in the World 

Racer, 16 lbs 
Ladies, 18 to 21 lbs 
Roadster, 18 to 21 lbs 

All Guaranteed for /,'■■■>•/ f~s, 
ll/E take pleasure in iDform- 
LU iu^ our agents and the 
trade generally that we 
bare perfected arrangements 
whirl) will enable us t 
promptly till all orders for th e 

Helical Tube Premiers 

it is better to wait for a 

"Helical Premier" than to 
break your neck on the ordin- 
ary wheels of other manufac- 
ture. No other manufacturer 
can use the " Helical Tube." 
The only wheel hacked by 
impartial tests Of the Ora- 

nana Departmt »> . U 8 Gov- 
ernment. See thi' Govern- 
ment tests printed in our 
Catalogue. 



PREMIER GYGLERy, 312-314 Baker St., S. F. 

Or to Collins &Co., 1018 Market St.; C. F. Cormaok, 1006 Valenoia St.; G.W. 
Glosser, 1213 Devisadero St.; R J. Harrison, 4'*.) McAllister St. 



Before You Buy Your 
1895 Wheel See the 



Strictly High Grade, 
All Late Improvements. 

Also^*- 

" DEERE" 
Light Roadster 

Best Value 

"DEERE" 
Model "A." 

Lowest Price. 

We can suit You a 



"National." 




*®-Send for Catalogue 



Deere Implement Gompanu. 



805 Market Btreet, 

San Francisco, Cal. 




MARKET ST. 
X.UW NESS AVE. 



AGENTS FOR 



Wffl& altairBICYCLES 

(ALUMINUM BWSJ 

ESSEX SPEQIAL strictly high grade. 
WESTMINSTER medium. 

Rebmrins a Spiggmty, 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



July 13, 1S95. 



SAN KRAXCISCO NEWS 1 .1 I 






SHAKESPEARE AND THE BICYCLE. 

TRD I.Y in. iv Shakespi 

but nil tin). There iv not B topic on 

then the i" 
date _•. for instani 1 is frequently alluded 

irks, not alone the differ -. but 

many of <>iir local riders, their costumes, distinguishing 

ed up one might . 
think they had -at to him for portraiture. 

Hamlet -peak- of his machine In thr 7V" Geatlem 

■ Launce desires to "set the world on wheels." The 

nger who brings war tidings toCommiusin Coriolanm 

complain- that he was forced "to wheel three or four 

miles " out of his way. In l.m, one is cautioned about " a 

great wheel running down bill, est one's neck be broken. 

Richard II. was happy in "the possession of a Royal." 

" The power of Essex " is alluded to in Henry 17.. while 

La Pucelle calls for "the Lordly Monarch." Imogen, in 

■ /ui'. "chose an Eagle." Aaron, in Titus Adronicus, 

tells Demetrius he ean " talk at pleasure of your safety." 

and in Richard III. Lord Stanley recommends Westminster 

to the Duchess of Gloucester. 

In the matter of attire. " those who wear strange suits" 
are touched up in As Yon Likt It. Imogen, in vymbeline, 
orders a riding suit. Pink speaks of "some sleeves, some 
hats," in the Midsummer Night's Dream. Iu the Tempest, 
"straw hats put on" is the order given. Emilia, in 
Othello, talks of "petticoats and caps." " Dainty ducks " 
are mentioned in the Wintt / •'.-• Tale and in Midsummer 
Nighfs Dream. "Serge" is spoken of in Henry VI.; "Suits 
of buff" in the Comedy of Errors ; "Peach colored suits" 
in Measure for Measure, and "Suits of sombre black" in 
Hamlet. Gower, in Henry 1*. surely saw some of "the 
horrid suits" daily seen in our Park, and Falstaff saw sev- 
eral others when he spoke of his "skirted page" in the 
Merry Wives of Windsor. "Use your legs" is advice 
offered in the Merchant of Venice. Margaret, in Much Ado 
About Nothing, "likes the new tire." Pistol is ready with 
"a rim." in Hairy V. "Straps" are spoken of in Twelfth 
Night. Those who "ride through the streets" are met 
with in Henry IV. 

Who can deny that the fat female who infests the main 
driveway of the Park is aptly described in Henry VI. as 
"exceeding the compass of her wheel," and in the Turning 
1,/ tin Shrew the thin-limbed ancient maid must surely have 
been foreseen when " more stocking than leg" is spoken 
of. To use the words of Trine ulo in the Tempest, " legged 
like a man," would fit a score or more of the bloomers who 
congregate near the music stand, and who, as Macbeth 
has it, "dare do all that may become a man." Would any 
of them dare to neglect the caution given in Antony and 
Cleopatra to "brake her wheel?" 



A New Cycle Company. 



The Pacific Coast agency of the Helical tube Premier is in future 
to be handled by the Western Premier Cycle CompaDy, a corpora- 
tion recently organized with a large capital, which will conduct the 
bicycle business in all its branches. They have just completed the 
finest cyclery on the coast, on Baker street, directly opposite the 
East entrance to the panhandle of the Park and will introduce many 
new feature.s Elegant accommodations have been provided for ladies 
and gentlemen, who can have every comfort and convenience. 
Lockers will be furnished for patrons and their wheels carefully 
cared for and repaired, when necessary. A shower bath and dress- 
ing room 9 have been provided, and competent teachers will attend to 
the instruction of new riders. The renting and care of wheels will be 
made a special feature of the establishment. 

This cyclery will doubtless attract the best class of trade of San 
Francisco, as the location is excellent ; there are no saloons or resorts 
in the neighborhood, the neighboring streets all are level aud bi lumen - 
ized, and its close proximity to the Park and the superior accommo- 
dations afforded should bring to it the cream of San Francisco's 
castom. The management is a guarantee of all this. Among those 
interested in the company are ex-postmaster Samuel W. Backus, 
Edward P. Slosson. for seventeen years with Holbrook, Merrill & 
Stetson, ex-mayor L. E. Ellert, L. W. Sanborn, John N. Sherburne, 
with the S. P. Co., and many others equally prominent. The 
Premier Helical Tube is the most wonderful Machine in the world. 
No other Manufacturer can use the Helical tube. See the U. S. 
Government tests published in their catalogue. 




Implements 

in eveQf 

-I 



*0mm 






•StiacstoR to 
AND 



40lMARK£Ttf! 

<SEMDftm cnauwe /loom Wli 




Tribune 

ana Bicycles 

Monarch 

Shelby Steel Tubing. 
Sundries of all kinds. 

BAKER & HAMILTON 

Sacramento, San Francisco and Los Angeles. 



THOS. E. KENT, 

597 Mission St. 

San Francisco, Cal. Cor. Second. 

LADIES and 
GENTLEMEN'S 

BIGUG16 



TO ORDER ONLY. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895. 




't A 



THE very latest thing in Trilbyism is a nightdress in 
pale ecru batiste, trimmed with yellow Valenciennes, 
that bears the name of the wonderful singer of Ben Bolt. 
The batiste is as pallid as cheese cloth and of a veil-like 
fineness, and in shape the gown borders somewhat on a 
painter's blouse and that of the French Pierrot. All the 
fullness hangs from the shoulder seams, and the bottom 
which is short enough to escape the floor all round, is 
turned in a simple hem. The sleeves are bishop shape, 
held short at the inside seam with a narrow insertion of 
the yellow lace, running lengthwise; they fall in a loose 
puff to the elbow, where they are finished with a batiste 
flounce with edging of the lace and insertion let in. About 
the neck and shoulders the Trilby nightdress is adorable. 
First, there is a vast sailor collar of the batiste, made 
vaster with rows of insertion and lace until it falls low on 
the arms like a cape, and inside this again there is a full 
ruche of the wide lace that hugs the throat with true 
clown effect. Wash ribbons in pale ecru fasten the ruche 
at the chin, and the collar is made to hang in heavy points 
at the sides, by being cut extra wide and the fulness 
plaited into the neck band back and front. Altogether 
this dainty specimen of lingerie calls to mind anything but 
the strapping young woman after whom it is christened. 
But it may have been suggested by the chtir de him- song 
Trilby sings, which is all about somebody who has urgent 
need of a pen, and of a hard-hearted Pierrot who won't 
open his door. At any rate it is enchantingly lovely — and 
like most lovely nightgowns, impracticable to a degree. 

Nothing is more sweetly fitting and youthful than a 
white dotted silk grenadine, very sheer, made over blue 
silk taffeta. The white grenadine skirt has nothing on 
the bottom, but a little tissue plisse, but the silk skirt is 
cut in points and trimmed with three little bias ruffles. A 
bouquet of rrvyosotis is fastened low down over the grena- 
dine plisse on the skirt of the gown, left side. These light 
silk skirts, when ruffled, have a charming effect, and 
keeps the outside skirt in lovely line. Simple corsage and 
elbow sleeves of grenadine; white lace bavette laid over 
pale blue velvet. Bouquets of myosotis on both shoulders, 
with butterfly bows of white lace. Entire collar-band of 
myosotis. White satin ribbon girdle, long ends on left 
side, fastened by a bunch of myosotis. White satin straw 
hat, trimmed with ruchings of white grenadine; four white 
wines and full white satin rosettes. The hat turns up 
sharply in the back with half-blown La France buds, 
erect. 

New York shopping and wheel-women are taking up 
pongee under things which are said to have all the cool 
virtues of thinner ones, besides everlasting qualities. The 
faint yellow of the pongee is not objectionable, though it 
cannot be denied that white nether garments, and cotton 
at that, are better taste. Other silk underclothes, with 
the exception of the colored petticoats and ribbed under- 
vests that have somehow grown indispensable, are con- 
spicuous by their absence. 

Fine stitchery marks the lingerie of the elegant woman. 
Ordinary people buy suits of white American lawn, dain- 
tily trimmed with Valenciennes, that seem nice enough for 
anybody ; but the feminine elegante decks her fair body 
with fragile, soft finished cottons, loaded with needlework, 
and is conscious of her superiority. 

The mechanical obstacles that have heretofore operated to prevent 
a constant supplv of sea water for the swimming tanks of the Lur- 
line Baths have been removed, and the company are prepared to re- 
all the tanks in from one hour to an hour and a half. Heretofore it 
was the work of fourteen hours. The tanks will be emptied here- 
after at 10 o'clock every night and refilled forthwith, and the public 
are invited to witness the operation, free of charge. 

The most complete and finest assortment of gentlemen's shirts, 
collars, cuffs, neckties, and underwear is kept by John W. Carmany, 
No. 25 Kearny street. He also keeps the latest patterns of ladies' 
shirts. 

Large Demand. Pioneer Brand Desiccated and Shredded Cccoanut Is 
now wanted everywhere. The demand Is larger than can be tilled. 



Great 
Sacrifice- 



Clearance 
Sale 



NOW IN PROGRESS. 



Everything at 

Forcing-out 

Prices, 



See daily papers for particulars. 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



New Whatcom, 



Washington, 



Is at the head of Bellingham Bay, on Puget Sound. It is the North- 
west City of the State of Washington; population about 10,000. 
It is the third city in size and wealth in Western Washington. All 
its industries are thriviog. 

IT HAS ADVANTAGES possessed by no other point in the State of 
Washington; the country if rich in coal, iron, and other minerals; 
it is rich in agricultural and timber land; the city is lighted by 
electricity; it has two electric street car lines; the water supply is 
from a large mountain lake 316 feet above the city front; the quan- 
tity of water is unlimited, and is used to drive machinery for 
manufacturing purposes. For domestic use it is unequaled. 

NEW WHATCOM is the home of the Bellingham Bay and British Colum- 
bia Railroad, and of the Bellingham Bay and Eastern Railroad; 
it is the American terminus of the Canadian Pacific Railway, an<i 
the Pacific Coast terminus of the Great Northern Railroad; the 
Northern Pacific Railroad is making preparations to enter the city; 
its harbor is one of the best in the world; the steamships of the 
Pacific Coast S. S. Company for the North all go there; steamers 
arrive at and depart daily from New Whatcom for all ports on 
Puget Sound. 



It is the Coming Great City. 



ERNST H. LUDWIG Z< CO., 

The Model 

American 

Caterers. 



1206 Sutter St., S. F. 



Telephone 2388. 



P Ki R BU|LDING 



PAPER. 



Paraffine Paint Co., 



116 Battery St., S. F., Cal. 



pjR. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 



114 Geary St., San Francisco. 



Dentist. 



July 13. 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO SEWS LETTER 



HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 



Di: W n DALY, of Pittsburg, Pa., hu collected .1 
riety of information 1 1 • probable that water 

ilia. !!• -,iys in Modern 1/ 
am finnh I that further investigation will us 

* us t.i the knowledge thai d malaria is. 

• y speaking, ■ water-bom disease, as that we are 
now being led to the right - on by Ernest Hart and 

others thai cholera is also .1 water-born disease, and it is 
our duty to educate the profession and the public, est 
ly those who make up the population of the malarial dis- 
tricts, that it is the water they drink, and not the air they 
breathe, that decides whether theywill suffer from malaria 
or not. I regard the malarial type of fever in the United 
States at least, as clearly preventable as any other dU- 
t hat we have to deal with, and by the simple method 
of drinking only carefully collected and uncontaminated 
rain-water, which, for a simple precaution, might be 
boiled. 

Tk you are going off a little ways, on too short a trip to 
carry a bag full of toilette necessaries — or if it is only go- 
ing to be an all-day excursion, put into you- pocket or 
chatelaine bag a small cucumber and a sharp penknife. 
Then when your face begins to feel moist and grimy, and 
you're sure the light of your countenance is begiuuing to 
shine, cut off a slice of that cucumber and press it over 
cheeks, chin, and forehead. It will not only take off even- 
particle of dust and perspiration, but it is marvelously 
cooling and refreshing, and worth a cartload of face pow- 
der. Besides, you can freshen up anywhere in a moment, 
and without the aid of a mirror, either. And if the vege- 
table be wrapped in a bit of confectioner's oiled paper, it 
can't dampen your pocket. Try it and see if it isn't a real 
comfort on a sticky day 



The English girl looks to her mother for counsel and 
guidance on every point in her life. Does the Ameri- 
can? The life of a French girl always remains a part of 
the being which bore her. Does that of the American 
girl? The Italian girl's life is known to her mother al- 
most as well, even in its most inner thought, as to the 
girl herself. Is that of the American girl? "The gospel of 
the Swiss girl is that of solicitation for her mother, morn- 
ing, noon and night. Is it the gospel of the American girl? 
The Dutch girl never dreams of telling her mother that 
she is going to do thus and so; she asks if she may. Does 
the American girl? In Germany, the daughter's first 
thought, when she reaches proper years, is to relieve her 
mother of every domestic care and thought. Is it the 
thought of the American? — Ladies Home Journal. 



Altogether too few wives realize that novelty and variety 
are as attractive to a man after marriage as before. The 
same gown evening after evening perhaps, the same 
coiffure year in and year out, may not exactly pall upon 
the taste of a devoted husband, but he soon ceases to look 
at his wife with the same interest as theretofore. After 
awhile she will miss the fond little compliments that are so 
pleasant to receive, and one of the most potent of her 
womanly weapons grows rusty from disuse. 

The thumb, according to professional palmists, is an un- 
erring index to the mind, says Current Literature. If a 
person is trying to deceive you, he will invariably draw 
his thumb in toward the palm. On the other hand, if he 
is telling the truth, the thumb will relax and point away 
from the palm. 

Gentlemen who dress well go to J. M. Litchfield, the fashionable 
military and merchant tailor, No. 12 Post street, for a neat fitting 
garment. He always keeps on hand a large assortment of imported 
goods, and in all cases he gives entire satisfaction to his customers. 
He is prompt in filling orders, and his reputation as a first-class 
tailor is established. He has the cream of the trade. 



When you are in need of a pair of neat-fitting and comfortable 
■'hoes leave your order with P. F. McNuIty, No. 139 Post street, first 
fl ;or of the Liebes building. He is the popular shoemaker, and has 
the fashionable trade of the city. He is always supplied with the 
finest and best material, and never fails to give entire satisfaction to 
customers. Call and see him. 



9 



Your husband will notice a great 
improvement in your cooking, 
wlien 



Your house will not be filled with 
the odor of hot lard, when 

V&UUSe©fekENE 

Your doctor will lose some of his 
Dyspepsia cases, when 

YnilttSfi CpffOLZ NE 

Your children can safely eat the 
same food as yourself, when 

Mm use (stfoiENE 

Your money will be saved, and 
your cooking praised, when 

V&uuse@32kENE 

Famous cooks, prominent phy- 
sicians and thousands of every- 
day housekeepers endorse it 
Will you give it a trial ? 
Bold In 3 and 5 pound palls, t y all grocer* 



Hade only by 

The N. K. Fairbank 
Company, 




ST. LOUIS and 

Chicago, IV * \v York* 
Boston. 



California Enterprise • 

American Condensed 
Milk Company. 



Factory, Marin County, Cal 



Main Office, 330 Pine street 



Combine Economy with 
Satisfaction .by Using 



Southfleid Wellington Goal. 



A. F. JOHNS X CO., 

Financial Agents. 

Dealers in Bonds and Securities. MONEY LOANED. 

633 Market street, room 9. San Francisco, Cal. 




For the best value in 



HATS or CAPS 



G. Herrmann & Go, 

The Hatters, 

328 Kearny St., 
Near Pine. (Entire Building) 

The ONLY Retail Hatters 
having their own factory. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895. 




,/■"> -' 



■eMnrfF/c4/s££M 



IT is generally understood that the stings of some insects 
are essentially poisonous in a greater or less degree, 
and must therefore be early and carefully treated, says 
Lancet. Pain alone in such cases will suffice for a danger 
signal. The fact that some species of fly are capable of 
great mischief is not so commonly known as it ought to 
be. No matter how trivial or how great the effect of the 
conveyed poison, it is much enhanced by all conditions of 
weakness or blood impurity existing in the sufferer. A 
mere midge or gnat-bite in one person will prove almost as 
serious in its effect as a septic wound in another. There 
are in the system all the materials for a conflagration, and 
a spark may light it up as well as a firebrand. The habits 
of insects afford a clue to the seeming vagary of their oc- 
casional and accidental virulence. The sting or the 
mandibles, which perhaps were buried an hour previously 
in some putrid sore, excreta, or offal, cannot penetrate a 
living tissue without leaving in it something of the same 
putrid character. It is safer therefore for the medical 
practitioner to regard each and every injury of this kind, 
however slight, as a possible source of illness and at once 
to contrive its relief by poulticing, antiseptic compresses, 
or like means. 

Old Spanish Mission architecture is reviving all 

over the State. This will be welcome news for the lovers 
of the picturesque in buildings and for the admirers of 
what blends with the useful and the ornamental, in the 
history and the climate, in this fairest of fair lands. Who 
that has ever seen the Saint Claire Club at San Jose but 
would prefer it to the Olympic or the University in San 
Francisco, or who that has looked upon the graceful out- 
lines of the station at San Juan Capistrano but would pre- 
fer it to the monstrosities which edge their way, like con- 
verted forges, to the rails of the Southern Pacific all over 
the State. And now we see that the Hospital of the 
Good Samaritans in Los Angeles is to be erected after the 
fashion of the old missions with their wealth of medieval 
outlines, their tiled roofs and their soft colors giving a 
semi-tropical appearance to the scene while sacrificing 
nothing in utility, but gaining all in beauty and effect. 

Gas as a motor for street cars has been successful 

in other places and there is no reason why it should not 
be successful in places near this city also. Practical tests 
have proved that the construction for a double track road, 
twenty cars and everything included, is as follows: By 
gas motor system, cost $28,500 per mile; by electrical sys- 
tem, $36,200 per mile; by horse car, $26,700 per mile. 
Then we find that the net operating expenses are as 
follows: By gas motor, six cents per mile; by electric 
system, eight cents per mile; by horse car, ten cents per 
mile. If all this is true, and we see no reason to doubt it, 
the chances are that gas is the coming motor for our 
street cars. 

If our fishing boats had freezing plants on board 

they could remain out longer and yet bring their catch to 
market in as good condition as they do now, if not better. 
The cost of such a plant would no doubt be considerable, 
but considering the importance of the fishing industry on 
this coast we believe that it would pay to equip our fish- 
ing boats with regular freezing outfits. A great deal of 
time would be spared, for boats would not be obliged to 
come into port so soon, and it is in this running in and out 
that the time is consumed and it is here that the freezing 
outfit would be found to be so valuable. 

When electricity came into use for general lighting 

purposes it was believed the days of gas companies were 
numbered. So far, however, the gas industry has thrived 
more than ever, and instead of electricity having proved 
the destruction of the gas companies it has been beneficial, 
in stimultating them to give every facility for the use of 
gas for heating and other purposes. 

For many years the Original Swain's Bakery has been the fashion- 
able restaurant of the city and the most popular. It is situated at 
213 Sutter street, where business men and ladies drop in for luncheon. 
The cuisine is of the best and the service is excellent. 



BANKING. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 
Capital Paid Up, $3,000,000. Reserve Fund .and Undivided Profits, $1,410,000 

Southeast Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 
HEAD OFFICE .60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan- 
iamo, and Nelson, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Ta- 
coma, Washington. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
Sodth America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of 
Sydney, Ld; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

3AN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits, June 30, 189-1 $24,061,791 27. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,637.053 43. 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B POND, Vice-President 

Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery. George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor sbould accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100.000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class companies, or grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-California Bank. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California St., S. F. 

Capital actually paid up in Cash, $1,00(1,000. Reserve Fund $ 685.000 

Deposits, June 29, 1895, $30,472,837 66. Guaranteed Capital. .$1,200,000 

OFFICERS— President, Edward Kruse; Vice-President, B. A. Becker; 
Second Vice-President, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Muller. 

Board of Directors— Edward Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Shoemann, 
A. C. Heine-ken, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steinhart, 
Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Capital authorized $6,000,000 I Paid Up $1 ,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 f Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART \ „..„.., 

P.N. LILTENTHAL) managers. 

WELLS, FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier | F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eld ridge .Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 



Wm. Alvord 
Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



DIRECTORS. 
Jerome Lincoln 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
A. K. P. Harmon 
J. B. Randol. 



CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN francisco. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid-Up Capital »1,000,000. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. P. Crocker, E. B. Pond. 



July 13, 1895. 



ik ikcisco news 



23 




" I WOULD *en«l you a kiw, pai>a." vroM little I.ury. who was away 
1 odi Tisit. " but I have lnwn eaiinir onions.'' -OUcapO 7&MI. 
N \s -Kittie, I don't hrar you talk aNuit your hntulsntm- employer 

any more. Kitty — No; I don't like him so well. The fact i*. be 

hurt my fevhngs dreadfully. Me told me he was married.— Loni*- 

iille t'ourirr -Journal. 

Kkui.ein Kn.u.ivno antique furniture dealer) — Would ymi say 
this wardrobe wan very .»1.|' "Old; 1 ihoold think BO, indeed. It 
DOBt have been made sometime before you came into the world.— 
JiiiiHttritfiM-hc Blatter. 

"Why is a great nmn like you found begging?" "Ah, madame, 
it La the only profession in which a gentleman can address a beauti- 
ful lady without the formality of an introduction." — Town and 
Country Journal. 

Or all the hearts that you have won 

Of none are you possessed, 
Because in keeping whole your own, 

You've broken all the rest.'— -Truth. 

\\v 1 just introduced >— What a very ugly man that gentleman near 
the piano is, Mrs. Hobson. She— Why, that is Mr. Hobson. He 
(equal to the occasion)— Oh, indeed. How true it is, Mrs. Hobson, 
that the ugly men always get the prettiest wives. — Tit Bits. 

"The trouble with too many women," says the corn fed philoso- 
pher, "is that they regard the marriage ceremony mainly as a 
license to eat onions and wear ill-fitting clothes." — The Journal, 
Indianapolis. 

Mother— Just look, Helene, at those magnificent ruins. Helene 
— 1 wonder why in the old times they built ruins instead of proper 
castles!— Lustige Blatter. 

Jimmy- Do you like your job? Tommy— No; I don't like nothin' 
about it, 'cept sometimes when you have to go and wait for a man 
that ain't in.— Puck. 

Friend (reading)— So this is one of your jokes, is it? Ha, ha, ha! 
Hi murist (testily)— Well, what are you laughing at? Ain't it a 
good one?— Truth. 

Mr. N in'om— He presented a pistol and declared he'd blow out my 
brains if I didn't yield. Miss Shapley— Oh, Mr. Nincom, why didn't 
you yield?— Truth. 

Mrs. Hoshmorb— You'll have to settle up or leave. Summer 
Boarder— Thanks, awfully. The last place I was at they made me 
do both.— Life. 

" A most wonderful bit of work. Those things were painted by a 
blind painter." " What were? " " Those blinds." — Rochester Union 
and Advertiser. 

Somehow we like a woman better who cries when she hammers 
her thumb in driving a nail than one who drives nails as good as a 
man. — Ex. 

" Won't you please take off your hat so that I can see the play?" 
" Yes, if you'll stop talking to your escort so that I can hear it. — 
Life. 

The theory that women dress to please men receives a shock 
every time a woman appears in bloomers. — The Globe, Atchison. 

Artillery Recruit— This constant firing of big guns gives me a 
headache. Sergeant— Shooting pains, 1 suppose?— Judy. 

Bobby— Why doesn't the clock strike thirteen, pa?" Pa— Because 
Bobby, it hasn't the face to do it.— Once a Week. 

She (after a lover's quarrel)— You may return my letters. He 
(editor)— Did you inclose stamps. — Once a Week. 

Peasant (to his wife who sees a steam roller for the first time)— 
Ah, this is the way they warm the streets I— Ex. 

How good a man is to his wife the first day after she has caught 
him do something wrong. — Once a Week. 

"I love and I am loved." "Then you must be perfectly happy." 
"But it isn't the same man!" — Life. 



BANKING. 



The Grand Canon Line '.— To the East ! 



Commencing Nov. 4th the "Santa Fe Route" Popular Overland 
Excursions to Chicago and Eastern Cities will leave every Wednesday. 
Manager in Charge. Through Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleep- 
ers are run to Chicago every day. This is the only Line by which the 
Grand Canon of the Colorado River can be reached. Send for illus- 
trated book giving full particulars. C. H. Speers, A. G. P. A., 650 
Market street, Chronicle Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething. 



CALIFORNIA SAFE OEPOSIT AND TRUST CO. 

I Miiv, g | 

OFFH 
Da) cell Drown - 

under 

Analffiii ind is u logal depoal 

' fumU 

Annuls t.. 1 1. Intoroat, dividends, renu t «te., tor residents 

<>r otnen. 
Aots as Trust orpomllona and Individual! 

for agency and rciotiirj ol stocks 
i;. cclves deposit) | allows Intero i lances, 

issues certificates ol ring Biod rates of interest, Eta 

doposlts in its sal in,'- dcpni 
Wills drawn and taken oare of « lihonl ol 
Information ai n nllng trusl matters oheerfullv given. 

OSIT BOXES to rem in prices from *;> per annum upward, 
■ i valuables ol itorcd ai lofl rates. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital 18,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (Ootober I, 1804). . 8.168,180 7i) 

WILLIAM ALVOKL) President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. .Vlce-PreaM 

ALLKN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

s. Prentiss Smith.... Abs'i Cashier I i, P. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Luidlaw & Co.; the Bank of Now York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremout Niuiuiial H;mk; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— M- sms de Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev.)— 
Agency of The Bunk ol" Culiforuia: Chicago— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Hank; Australia and New Zealand— Bank of 
New Zealand ; China, Japan, and India— Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney. Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Bdildinq. 

Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. Paid-Up Capital, $300,000. 

officers 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President. | S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 
Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Dresler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Mofllt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant,. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Well, Fargo, & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital Paid-up $2,450,000 

Reserve $500,000 

San Francisco Office— 424 California St. London Office— 73 Lombard St., E. 
C. Portland Branch— Chamber of Commerce Building. 
Tacoma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER | Ass't Manager. WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 
LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $800,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y, Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the prinoipal cities of the 
world Commercial and Travelers 1 Credits issued. 



SIG. GREENBAUM1 MQT , „ D „ n 
C. ALTSCHUL J Managers. 



SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS, FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

Corner BUSH AND SANSOME ST. 

Steel safes rented from $5 a year upward. Trunks and packages stored 
at reasonable rates. Absolute security for valuables. Prompt and oareful 
attention to customers. 

OFFICE HOURS: 8 A. M. to 6 P. M. 

CALIFORNIA TITLE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY. 

Paid-up Capital, $25u,(J00. Cash Reserve Fund, $85,000. 
L. R. ELLERT, Manager. 
This company loans money on real estate and transacts a general trust 
business It also makes and continues abstracts of title and issues guar- 
antee policies which protect the holder ugainst loss. 
OFFICE— Mills Building. San Francisco. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President 

ERNST BRAND .' Secretary 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895. 




MY FAITH.— FRAHCIS SALTUS SAITUS IH ORCAMS AFTER SUNSET— C. MOULTON. 



w 



HEN I press unto mine arms with thirst of capture, 
The fond form my yearning senses idolize, 
The pale thought of separation from such rapture, 
Comes to chill me with its terrible surprise. 

As I kiss the loving head so fair, so fragile, 
With its goldeu wreath of luminous soft hair, 

I feel sensuously the young life free and agile, 
That craves naught save utter love to win and share. 

But those glorious eyes imperial of flashes, 
That proud love m which I revel with my trust, 

Must return some day to darkness and to ashes, 
And its loveliness must crumble into dust. 

And that heart that glows for me with such pure burning, 
That great heart of which my amour is so vain , 

Must depart to glooms from whence is no returning. 
And must leave me to my loneliness and pain. 

This I know and feel; and tremble as I cherish 
The frail love-cloyed wonder dreaming in my arms, 

And the thought alone that such a prize might perish 
Elates my senses with the fever of alarms. 

But if she should die and friends knew what befell me, 
They would haunt my woe and poignant grief sincere, 

And with solemn voice beside the corpse would tell me, 
Of eternity and some far better sphere. 

They would tell me that more radiant and immortal, 
She would wait for me despite the fears of tomb; 

And that on the grim, gray threshold of Death's portal, 
We could meet again our transport to resume. 

Taking kisses of white snows from mountains chilly, 
Stealing murmurs from the music of the sea, 

Taking perfume from the rose or from the lily, 
Is like taking her fond memory from me. 

She is all and all to me, love hath no limit, 
And I scorn to bound a passion equal mine, 

It was born of her, and she alone can dim it, 
Until then its flame shall calmly, nobly shine. 

And I need no ministering angel hovering round me, 

To protect me and to turn me from despair; 
For my love has found her out and she has found me, 

And when dead we cannot sympathize elsewhere. 
What care I of after-life when I have lost her, 

What is there that can her loveliness replace, 
What kind germ of hope can my soul ever foster, 

When mine eyes see not the splendor of her face? 

I shall find her, yes, I doubt it not, but splendent, 
And in haloes of great glory and great light; 

But the old, old love, so noble and transcendent, 
Will not rise again to penetrate my night. 

No, if she should die, I need no prayer that blesses, 
And no soothing hymn could cure a wound like this, 

Being reft of all the balm of her caresses, 
And the sott, sad, slumbering silence of her kiss. 

I would sooner fight with Death my unfair duel, 

And live on despite this fatal horoscope; 
For the pain I would endure would be less cruel , 

Than the horrid, bitter promise of such hope. 

For I need her now, when Love all love assuages, 
When our youth and ardor mutually blend; 

And I mock the dim, gray Future of dead ages, 
And I need no life hereafter to befriend. 

Yet, I need her now, with all her grace and splendor, 
With her ebon eyes that beam with love and prayer; 

I am thirsting for the contact of her, tender, 
And the strange, delirious perfume of her hair. 

And should Death essay her gentle breath to sunder, 
1 would hope not, pray not, knowing all were vain, 

That we never more should meet above or under, 
That our spirits ne'er would fuse and blend again. 

I would find new strength and soul should Death bereave me 
No pale tear of pain would glisten in my eye; 

I would love enough to let her spirit leave me, 
And would live without a hope, without a sigh. 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Fireman's Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,000,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California St., S. F. 
Fire Insurance. Fire Re-Insurance. 

SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, OF LONDON, funded a. d. mo. 

Cash Assets, $10,270,535. Oldest purely fire insurance office iu the world. 

THE LION FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD., OF LONDON. 

Established A. D. 1879. Cash Assets, $1,108,095. 

THE IMPERIAL INSURANCE CO., LTD., OF LONDON. 

Instituted 1803, Cash Assets. $0,362,920. 40 years of business on Pacific 
Coast WM. J. LANDERS, Manager for the Pacific Coast. 

205 Sansome St., near Pine. 

PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT Assets. 

WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto $1,642,001.80 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO., **•» 1,504,714.11 
BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE CO., °j Toronto 1,164,196.26 

H. M. GRANT, Manager. C. A. STUART, Ass't Manager. 

Office— 423 California Street. 

queen Insurance company of America, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up » 500,000 

Assets 3,747,551 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,654,489 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 401 Montgomery St. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St. 
AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. Established 1825. 

Capital, $2,250,000. Total Assets, $6,854,653 65 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT: 204 Sansome St., S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, Established^. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. incorporated 1799. 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 
413 California St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 
Capi tal $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 316 California St., S. F. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG. GERMANY. 

V. CARUS DRIFFIELD, Manager for the Pacific Coast Branch. 

213 Sansome St., S. F. 

Assets $2,741,873 00 

Liabilities 923,01m 00 

Surplus to Policy Holders $1,818,873 00 

Cash Assets in United States 684,889 00 

GEO, MARCUS & CO., ABentSCUyDePar,me »icaliforniaSt.,SF. 



Iff HJJb fTrTc v 




REMOVED TO 824 MARKET STREET, PHELAN BUILDING. 




LOCAL APHORISMS. 
"The dog that barks is never a good hunter."— I 

ht. 

■The devil finds no difficulty in catohing a Ian man." 
A nise doctor is better than an anny with banners." 

"When Fortune opens one door, other doors open them 
' "hat. L. friir 

"Never ash a favor of a man until be lias bad his 
dinner.'" — Byron Wah 

"If you do not drive your business your business will 
drive you."— C. P. Huntington. 

" Gentle birth if sent to market will not buy one bushel 
of corn." — Lord Sholto Douglas. 

" 1 am obeying the injunction of the Bible to 'Get thine 
house in order." —Chief Crowley. 

"Physicians' faults are covered with earth and rich 
men's with money.'' — Dr. Boy son. 

"If you play with a fool in the house he will play with 
you in the street." — II". /•'. Goad. 

"There is little use of saving at the tap if we waste at 
the bunghole." — Auditor Broderick. 



M ICHAEL HEVERIX. an old and highly respected citi- 
i V zen of San Francisco, died at his home in Tiburon on 
Monday last at the advanced age of seventy years. He 
was a native of England, and came to California at an 
early day. He was the father of five children, Edward J., 
Charles R.. and Angelo M. Heveriu, and of Mrs. George 
E. Nather and Mrs. T. E. Harley. He was also the grand- 
father of James Emmet, Mary E., and Amelia S. Hayden. 

Those who want a fine quality of liquor for medicinal purposes or 
for home use will find the Jesse Moore AA whisky superior to any 
other brand. Sold by all druggists and the principal saloons. 

SOMEWHERE TO DINE. 

There's many a man, saint or sinner — 

Who knows not the right place to go 
In search of a lunch or a dinner, 

Not too dear, but yet served cemme il faut. 
Now here's the address — read and mark it — 

Where the choice of the best is at hand. 
Stalls 68 and 70. California Market— 

Moraghan's Oyster Stand. 

There's no need to look far for the reason 

Why the patronage pays in the pelf, 
For they serve all the good things in season, 

And the boss runs the business himself. 
And the delicate, succulent oyster 

Is ever in greatest demand 
In that pleasant, convenient cloister 

Moraghan's Oyster Stand. 

" Californians " or " Easterns," they all are 

Put up in the daintiest style. 
And it's very well spent is a dollar 

In sampling these bivalves a while; 
For the epicure ne'er finds an oyster 

In any lay-out in the land 
That tempts him to revel and royster 

Like Moraghan's Oyster Stand. 

nn DiPnRn'Q RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genn- 
Urt. nIOUnU O ine— A specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States 
J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, SI 25; of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills, 
S3 50; of 400 pills, *6; Preparatory Pills, $2. Send for circular. 

CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

CANDIES. 
CANDIES.— Don't leave the city without a box of ROBERTS' Best. 

DENTISTS. 
R. Cutlar, 412»/a Post street. 

DRUGGISTS. 
Evans's Poison Oak Specific. P ositive cure. Sold by all druggists. 

RESTAURANTS. 
Franco-American Restaurant, 521 Montgomery street. F. Hitte. 

VOCAL CULTURE. 
Miss Caroline Shlndler, Soprano. Vocal Culture. Hours, 1 to 3, 2416 Clay 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 

Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CQ 506 Market street. 

Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 



NEWS LKTT1 25 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Otborn Hill Gold M.mng and Milling Company. 

.■ .if ihi< Hoard <>t i ■ 

nl Tweiilj tiro 
- nf ihe corporation, 
hi ibe 
1 ■ 

main unpaid on 
•- OF JULY, irvs, 
will bo delinquent and advert l*pd ,,, and unlets 

payment Is mad , MONDAY, the Twenty-ninth dai 

ol July |MM>. to paj IhcdidltKjuiMtl h COS U Of ad 

remain :, h\ unlernf the Board of Directors, 

u R QR lYSON, Secretary, 

Office— Room 01. :«i piiie N tnvi < o . Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Pototi Mining Company. 

Hlon of principal place ol bus1n6fts~4an Franoisoo, Cal. Location 
,,1 works— Virginia, ,\< 

Notice Is hereby given thai ai a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 10th day of July, 1805, ac assessment. No. 44, ol Twenty live cents 
per share was levied upon tin- inpitai sioeli of tin- onpm-ution, payable 
Immediately, In United States gold cola, to the Secretary, at theoiiiceof 

the company, rmim T'.t, Ncviidii Bind;, 3tfil Montgomery Street, San Frau- 
olsco, Cal. 
Any stook upon which this assessment Shall remain unpaid on the 
14th DAY OF AUGUST, 1895, 

will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction \nd unless 
payment is made before, will he sold on WEDNESDAY, the 4th day of 
September, 1895, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 
Ofllce— Room 79, Nevada Bloclt, 3U9 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Challenge Consolidated Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 11th day of June, 1895, an assessment (No. 19) of Five Cents (5c.) 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 35, Mills Building, northeast corner of Montgomery and 
Bush streets, San Francisco, California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
16th DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on TUESDAY, the 6th day of August, 
1895, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertis- 
ing and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

C. L. McCOY, Secretary. 
Office— Rooms No. 35, third floor Mills Building, northeast corner Mont- 
gomery and Bush streets. San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the twelfth day of June, 1895, an assessment, No. 58, of 25 cents per 
share, was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately in United Stales gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
18TH DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on Thursday, the 8th day of August, 
1895, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors , 

M. JAFFE. Secretary. 

Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Bullion Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 12th day of June, 1.895, an assessment (No. 45) of lOo. per share, was 
levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately in 
United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the company, room 
3.1, 331 Pine street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment, shall remain unpaid on the 
17th DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
will be delinquent, and advertised fur sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will besoldon WEDNEDAY, the 7th day of August, 
1895, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of Lhe Board of Directors. 

R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 20. 331 Pi'iip street. S. F,, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 19 

Amount per Share 10 cents 

Levied June 25, 1895 

Delinquent in Office July 30. 1895 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock ; August 21, 1895 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Offioe— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Curry Stiver Mining Company. 

Assessment • No. 76 

Amount per Share • 15 cents 

Levied July 2, 1895 

Delinquent in Office August 6, 1895 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 28, 1895 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895. 



RAMBLER BICYCLES 



Are Pre-eminent. 




No. 10. weight 15 and 18 lbs 
No. 14, weight 22 pounds 
No. 12, weight 25 pounds 
Ladies' E, weight \9% lbs 
Ladies 1 D, weight 24 lbs 



G. & J. Tires 
Wood Rims 
Steel Rims 
Copper Rims 



tu.. m d WflPMEV 1325 Market Street, San Francisco 
I llOa. M. D. VnlvIlL/, «7 S. Spring Street, Los Angeles. 



Snell Seminary. 



The Fall Term will open 
August 5, 1895, at 

®-^The Merritt Place, 

Corner Fourteenth and Madison streets, Oakland, Cal , the 
residence of the late Dr. Samuel Merritt. 

Pupils prepared for admission to any of the Universities. A 
tine corps of teachers for Advanced, Intermediate and Kinder- 
garten Departments. Send for catalogue. 



Mary E. Snell, Principal. 



1849 Jackson St 



Van Ness Young 
Ladles Seminary 



San Francisco 



Under the ownership and direction of S. H. WILLEY, aided by ft corps o 
twelve teachers. Numbers in the family limited to twenty-five. 

Next Term Opens August 1st. 



Stiiool For Boys, 



The school opens for boarding 
and day scholars on 
AUGUST 1, 1895. 



1012 Gratid Street, near San Jose Avenue, 
ALAMEDA, Cal. 



W. de JUNG, Principal. 



THe Banjo. 

ftshton P. Stevens, 

STUDIO: 20 Montgomery street, 
Room 8. Pupils prepared for Stage, 
Concert, or Drawing Room. A Special 
Class for 
teachers who wish to perfect themselves in the Banjo's harmony and technlc 



Miss Manson's School, 



Boarding and Day School for Young 
Ladies and Children. 1625 San Jose 
avenue, between Grand and Paru Sts. 



Alameda, Gal. 



GEORGE FAIR, 

LATE ACCOUNTANT IN THE GRANGERS' BANK 
OF CALIFORNIA. 

Auditing and experting books of corporations, banks, and 
mercantile firms attended to. OFFICE : Merchants' Ex- 
change Building, California St., Room 27. 
Advertiser is a member of the San Francisco Produce Exr 
change and Call Board Association. Correspondence with 
grain warehousemen and country merchants solicited. 



( lo in the 

"NEW louvre; 



8-14 O'FARRELL ST. 



We have removed the " Louvre " from the old basement un- 
der the Phelan Building, and now occupy the finest quar- 
ters above ground in the city. 
RUDOLPH HAGEN. FELIX EISELE, Proprietors. 




THE Glorious Fourth holiday is a thing of the past, and 
from all accounts those who remained in town during 
that period had quite as "good a time" as the majority of 
those who passed it at any of the resorts. At each and 
all of them there seemed to be a sad lack of "go;" and 
then, too, the numerous house parties took away from dif- 
ferent locales many of the people who have in the past con- 
tributed in no slight degree to the success of the gay do- 
ings of wherever they might have been staying. These 
same house parties were quite a feature of the holidays 
this year, and from Castle Crags to San Rafael, from Clear 
Lake to Monterey every one owning a summer home of 
large or small dimensions had them full to repletion of vis- 
iting friends. Along the line of the San Jose railroad they 
were especially noticeable, the many pretty homes between 
Burlingame and Menlo Park containing among their guests 
some of our best known beaux and belles, and liveliest 
members of our social world. The hostesses included Mrs. 
Moses Hopkins, Mrs. Howard, Mrs. E. E. Eyre, Mrs. 
George Lent, Mrs. Perry Eyre, Mrs. Girvin,* Mrs. Ed 
Eyre, Mrs. Head, Mrs. James Robinson, and Mrs. Selby. 
While among the guests were the Joe Reddings, Hall 
McAllisters, Robert Poremans, George Pinckards, Mrs. 
C. A. Spreckels, Mrs. Bliss, the Misses Hobart, Hooker, 
Woolrich, Casserley, Laura McKinstry, Jennie Blair, Sadie 
Maynard, Kate Clement, Alice McCutcheon, Florence 
Mills, and Laura Bates, the Messrs. Osgood Hooker, 
Lansing Kellogg, Walter Hobart, Eugene Lent, Will 
Heath, Will Page, Beazeley, Williamson, etc. With such 
a large circle to draw from it is surely a matter of little 
wonder that Burlingame was about the jolliest spot in 
the vicinity of San Francisco, and there was an incessant 
round of luncheons, coach parties, polo, golf, tennis, etc., 
and since pigeon shooting has been added to its attrac- 
tions the crowd of men there has increased. 



The Crocker cottage at Castle Crags contained a very 
merry party which included Miss May Holbrook, Nellie 
Hillyer, Ella Goodall, Sam Knight, Ed Sheldon, Harry 
Holbrook, and their entertainers, the Misses Fanny and 
Julia Crocker, who were untiring in providing a variety of 
amusements for their guests. Mrs. Flood and Miss Jennie 
had Major and Mrs. Rathbone as their guests at Del 
Monte; Mrs. Peter Donahue had a party of friends, includ- 
ing pretty Miss McKenna, visiting her at the Hotel Rafael; 
Mrs. de Vecchi entertained Miss Morgan; and the Mc- 
Laughlins, the Phelans, and the J. Philip Smiths also hud 
large parties at the villas in Santa Cruz. 



If the tennis ball at Sar. Rafael did not quite equal ex- 
pectations, the same cannot be said of the entertainment 
at the Mount Tamalpais Academy, which took place on 
Saturday evening. It was a great success, the different 
participants doing remarkably well in the little comedy of 
My Turn Next, and the Living Pictures were so good as to 
elicit the most enthusiastic and prolonged applause, the 
culminating pleasure being the dancing with which the 
evening's entertainment closed. 



Pink and white weddings have been so much of a fad 
this past season, Miss Cutlar decided she would make 
some other combinations of colors, and so pink and green 
were the tints selected and used with charming effect in 
the decoration of the rooms of the Cutlar residence, on 
Broadway, last Tuesday evening. For this green foliage, 
pink roses, and sweet pea blossoms were chiefly in evi- 
dence, a promiuent feature being the pretty arch in the 
bow window, from which was suspended a lovely floral bell, 
underneath which the Reverend O. C. Brown performed 
the marriage ceremony between Miss Olive Cutlar and 
John Hosford Hunt. The bride looked extremely pretty in 
a robe of white silk, made with a court train and richly 
trimmed with lace, a cluster of orange blossoms confining 
the long tulle veil to her hair; her hand bouquet was of 
bride roses. Miss Eugenie Hunt, who officiated as maid 

The latest in Fashionable Note Paper, "Florentine Mosaic," at Cooper's. 



July 13, 1895. 



of honor, was gowned in pink crepe irimmnl with la. 
ornaments, and bm carried .» boaquel of La 1 
The bridesmaids, the M 

■ us. if white tuHeover white sill,. 

and their bouquets were of pink sweel |>.-;iv George II. 

.- the yroom's In'st man. A liir^'o reception 

remony, and then an elegant supper was 

I. The presents, which were displayed in one of the 

rooms upstairs, comprised jewelry, silverware, cut glass, 

. and were of much value, Mr. and Mrs. 

Bunt are spending their honeymoon at Coronado. and on 

th.-ir return will occupy their new house at 2814 Bush 



Miss babel Hoy and John T. Daislv can be named as a 
very patriotic COUple, they having chosen the nations 

birthday for their wedding day. The ceremony, which 

was performed by the Reverend W. A. Buck, of St. John's 
Episcopal Church, took place at the home of the bride's 
father, on Seventeenth street, which was prettily decked 
with flowers and filled with the friends of the young couple, 
the bride wearing a handsome gown of white brocaded 
silk, trimmed with point lace and orange blossoms. An 
elaborate supper followed the service and congratulations, 
and a tour of the Southern counties has been made by the 
happy pair during the honeymoon. 

On Wednesday evening of next week St. Mary's Cathe- 
dral will be the scene of the nuptials of Miss Minnie Munroe 
and Dr. Andrew Maguire, which will be followed by a recep- 
tion at the Munroe residence on Seventeenth street. 

Society is looking forward with many pleasant expecta- 
tions to the wedding of Miss Belle McPherson and Lieuten- 
ant McCracken, which will be the first society gathering 
in town of the late summer, and for which event there will 
be a number of returns to town. 

Among recently announced engagements are those of 
Miss Rose Faull and William Ormsby Wayman, and of Miss 
Hannah Clayburgh and Kauffman Wertheimer. The latter 
couple will " receive " to-morrow and on next Thursday 
afternoon from two to live o'clock, at 1810 Bush street. 



SAN PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



*7 



On Tuesday evening last Dr. Beverly Cole was guest of 
honor at a reception and banquet given by the San Fran- 
cisco Medical Society. Dr. Cole has just received the 
well-merited honor of beiug elected President of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association, and has recently returned from 
an extended tour of the Eastern States. 



Mrs. George Crocker has been made happy by the ar- 
rival from New York of her son, and daughter, Miss Alice 
Rutherford. They went directly to Castle Crags, where, 
after a brief visit, the entire party will go to Del Monte 
for the rest of the summer. Mrs. W. H. Howard and her 
daughter are now at Del Monte, as are Lansing Kellogg, 
Ed. Schmieden, Walter Hobart, and General and Mrs. 
Edward Kirkpatrick, who have recently returned to Cali- 
fornia after a lengthened absence abroad. Miss Pindley 
will be the guest of Mrs. W. S. Barnes for some time to 
come. Next week will see a large arrival of guests at Del 
Monte, among others Colonel and Mrs. J. V. D. Middleton 
and the Misses Juliet and Hannah Williams. Mr. and Mrs. 
W. I. Kip and their two pretty daughters, who returned 
from San Rafael last Monday, will spend a week there, 
and are booked to arrive about Thursday next. 



. The Frank Carolans are the most recent cottage arrivals 
at Burlingame. Judge and Mrs. Morrow and their daughter 
have returned from their trip to Alaska. John Ma.;kay is 
due to-day from the East on one of his periodical business 
trips to the Coast. 

The commencement exercises of The Medical Depart- 
ment of the University of California will take place at the 
Baldwin Theatre this Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock. 



Those who attend the Sunday afternoon concerts at Haywards 
Park are always pleased with the entertainments. The music and 
dancing, and other sports are delightful, as well as the scenery on 
the way to and from the Park. The Club House furnishes excellent 
refreshments. The Oakland, San Leandro and Haywards Electric 
Railway takes visitors directly to the Park. The band engaged for 
the occasions is one of the best. 




Gallons for 25 



Not of tlir prcpnraMons of coloring 
mnUeraud esnonttal oils no often 
sold undor tho numo of rootbeer, 
but of tho purest, tnajst delicious, 
health-giving beverage possible to 

produce One gallon of Hires' Is 
worth leu of the counterfeit kind. 

Suppose an Imitation extract costs 
five cents less than the genuine 
Hires; the same amount of sugar 
aud trouble Is required; you save 
one cent a gallon, and — get an un- 
healthful imitation In tho end. Ask 
for HIRES and gctlU 

HIRES 

Rootbeer 



THE f HAS. E. HIRES CO., Philadelphia. 
fimiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiimiiiiMHiiiiiiiiimiiiifiiiiiiniff 



inn 



ANNUAL MEETING 

Spring Valley Water Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Spring Valley Water 
Works will he held at the office of the President of the company, No. 508 
California street. San Francisco, Gal., on 

WEDNESDAY. THE 17th DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
at the hour of 13 o'clock m., for the purpose of electing Trustees, and the 
transaction of such other business, as may come before the meeting. 

An amendment will be proposed to the By-Laws of the company, chang- 
ing the date of the annual meetings of stockholders from the third' Wednes- 
day of July to the second Wednesday of January of each year, and if such 
amendment be adopted, then the trustees elected at this meeting shall be 
elected to serve until the first annual meeting to be held under said amended 
By-Law, on the second Wednesday of January, 1897. 

WILLIAM NORRIS, Secretary. 

Office— No. 508 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Union Consoli- 
dated Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 
room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal., on 

MONDAY, the 15th DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m,, for the election of a Board of Directors to serve 
for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other business as may 
come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Thursday, July 11, 
1895, at 3o'clook p. m. A. P. SWAIN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 4. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Savage Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Savage Mining 

Company will be held at the office of the company, room 50, Nevada Block, 

No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on THURSDAY, the 

18TH DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
to serve for the ensuing year, and for the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Monday, 
July 15th, at 3 o'clock P. m. E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Virginia & Gold Hill Water Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Virginia & Gold 
Hill Water Company will be held at the office of the company, room 35, 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal., on Thursday, the 

35th DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Trus- 
tees to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. W. W. STETSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 35, Nevada Block, 309 Moatgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

San Francisco, July 9, 18»5. 




Max flDranam, 

Caterer. 

SALADS, Ices, etc., delivered 
at short notice. Weddings, 
Receptions. Breakfasts, Din- 
ners, Private Picnics, etc., at- 
tended to. 

428 Gearu St. 

Telephone 2358 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 13, 1895- 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

(Pacific System.) 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



Leave. \ From June 14, 18!)5. \ Arrive 

*6:30 A San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 9 :15 a 

7:00a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 10:50p 

7:00 A Benicia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, and Redding, via Davis 7:15 p 

7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Napa. Cal- 

istoga, and *Santa Rosa 6:15 p 

7 :30 a San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 10:15 a 

8:30 a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Red 

Bluff, and Oroville 4 :15 P 

*8:30A Peters and Milton *7:15P 

9:00 A San Leandro Haywards and Way 

Stations 11 :45 A 

9:00a New Orleans Express, Raymond, 
(for Yosemite), Santa Barbara, 
Los Angeles, Deming, El Paso, 
New Orleans and East 5:45P 

9:00a Martinez and Stockton 10:45a 

10:00 a San Leandro, Haywards, Niles... 1:45 P 

12:00m San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 2 :45 P 

1:00 P Niles, San Jose and Livermore. . . 8:45 a 

*1 :00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00p 

tl :30 p Port Costa and Way Stations f7:45p 

3:00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 5 :45 P 

4 :'i0 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 6 :45 P 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano and 
Santa Rosa 9:15 a 

4:00p Benicia, Vacaville, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, Marysville, 
Oroville, and Sacramento 10:45a 

4:30p Niles, San Jose, Livermore and 

Stockton 7 :15 P 

5:00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 8 :45 p 

5:30 p Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Raymond (for Yosemite), Bakers- 
field, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles 10:45 a 

5:30 p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojave and East 10:45A 

6:00 p European mail, Ogden and East. . 9:45 A 

6:00 P Haywards, Niles and San Jose. . . 7:45 A 
17:00 P Vallejo t?:45P 

7 :00 p Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 
Puget Sound and East 10:45 A 

7:00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations I0:50p 

9:00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations t+ffl :00 a 

t+ll:15P San Leandro, Haywards and 

Way Stations *7 : 15 A 

Santa Cruz DivrsmN (Narrow Gauge). 
J7:45A Sunday excursion for Newark, San 
Jose, Los Gatos, Felton, Santa 
Cruz 18:05 p 

8:15A Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, BoulderCreek, Santa Cruz 

and way stations 5:50 p 

*2:I5 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
New Almaden, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 
way stations *11 ;20 A 

4 :45 P Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos 9 :50 A 

Coast Divisio n (Third and Townsend streets)! 
*6:45A San Jose, New Almaden and way 

stations *1 :45 p 

J7:30 a Sunday Excursion for San Jose. 
Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove, and 
principal way stations t8:35 p 

8:15 a San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
Luis Obispo and principal way 

stations 7:05 p 

J9:47 A Palo Alto and way stations .. , tl:45P 

10:40a San Jose and way stations 5:00p 

11 :45 a Palo Alto and way stations 3:30 P 

*2:30pSau Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove *10:40A 

*3:30pSan Jose and principal way sta- 
tions 9 :47 A 

*4 :30 p San Jose and Way Stations *8 :06 A 

5 :30 p San Jose and way s tations *8 :48 A 

6 :30 p San Jose and way stations 6 :35 A 

flI:45pSan Jose and way stations |7:40p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From San Francisco— Foot of Market street 
(Slip 8). 

♦7:00.8:00, 9:00, *10:00 and 11:00 A. M., *12:30 
J 1 :00, *2 :00, 3 :00, *4 :00, 5 :00 and *6 :00 p. m. 
From Oakland- Foot of Broadway. 

*6:00, *7:00. 8:00, *9:00, 10:00 and *1 1:00 A.M. 
1 13 :00, *12 :30, 2 :00, *3 :00, 4 :00 and *5:00 P. M. 

A for Morning. P for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

^Thursdays only. JSundays only, 

tt Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

The Pacific Transfer Company wilt call for 
and check baggage from hotels and residences. 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 



WISE AND OTHERWISE. 

Idleness is as fatiguing as repose is sweet. 
— De Levis. 

Next to excellence is the appreciation of 
it.— Thackeray. 

To great evils we submit; we resent little 
provocations.— Hazlitt. 

We reform others unconsciously when we 
walk uprightly.— Mine. Swetchine. 

True wisdom, in general, consists in en- 
ergetic determination. — Napoleon. 

To overcome evil with good is good, to re- 
sist evil by evil is evil. — Mohammed. 

Precept is instruction written in the sand- 
the tide flows over it and the record is gone. 
Example is graven on the rock.— Channinq. 

Would they could sell us experience, 
though at diamond prices, but then no one 
would use the article second-hand. — Balzac. 

To succeed in the world, it is much more 
necessary to possess the penetration to dis- 
cover who is a fool than to discover who is a 
clever man.— Cato. 

Mistrust the man who finds everything 
good, the man who finds everything evil, 
and still more the man who is indifferent to 
everything.— Larater. 

There are many troubles which you can- 
not cure by the Bible and the hymn-book, 
but which you can cure by a good perspira- 
tion and a breath of fresh air.— Beecher. 

No man can ever be noble who thinks 
meanly and contemptuously of himself, and 
no man can ever be noble who thinks first 
and only of himself.— Dolhnger. 

Little oak trees, an inch and a half high, 
are grown by Chinese gardeners. They 
take root in thimbles. 



Oakland, San Leandro & Hauwards 
Electric Railway. 

Connects with the broad gauge local at Fruit- 
vale every half hour for San Leandro, San 
Lorenzo, and Haywards. 

Classic and popular music every Sunday from 11 
A. m. to 5 P. m. at Haywards Park. 

The Club-house cuiBine excellent. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 A. M., July 5, 9, 19, 24 ; August 
3,8, 18; Septembers 17. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound ports, July 5, 9, 14, 
19. 24, 29, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka, Areata, and Field's Landing 
(Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pomona," every Tues- 
day at 2 P. M. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
July 4, 8, 13, 16, 20, 24, 28, and every fourth day 
thereafter at 8 A. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles), and Newport, July 2, 6. 10, 14, 18,22,20, 
30. and every fourth day thereafter, at 11 a. m. 

Steamer " Pomona, 1 ' Saturday to Monday ex- 
cursion to Santa Cruz and Monterey, leaves 
Broadway Wharf 1, Saturday, 4 p. m. 

For Ensenada, San Jose del Cabo, Mazatlan, 
La Paz Altata, and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer 
"Willamette Valley," 10 a.m., 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Coolgardie gold-fields , 
(Freeman tie) Australia, 
$220 first class, $110 steer- 
age. Lowest rates to Cape- 
town, S. Africa. 

O. S. S. Co.'s steamers 
sail: 

For HONOLULU. APIA, 
AUCKLAND, and SYD- 
NEY, S. S. ALAMEDA, 
July 25th, at 2 P. M. 
For HONOLULU, S. S. 
"AUSTRALIA," 
August 3d, at 10 a.m. 
SPECIAL PARTIES— Reduced special rates 
for parties August 3d and 27th. (Cook's Party 
August 3d ) 
For passage apply to 138 Montgomery street. 
For freight applv to 327 Market street. 
J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., General Agts. 




SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

Tiburon Ferry— Foot of Market Street. 
SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:40, 9:20, 11:00 A m; 12:35,3:30 
5:in, 6:30 p m. Thursdays— Extra trip at 
11:30 P m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 
and 11:30 PM. 

SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A m; 1:30. 3:30, 5:00, 
6:20 pm. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:25, 7:55, 9:30, 11:10 AM; 12:45. 
3:40, 5:I0pm. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :55 
and 6 :35 p m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 am; 1:40,3:40,5:00, 
6 :25 p m. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 
same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 



t in Effect 
I Nov. 1, 1894. 



I Arrive in S. F. 



Sayt Sundays. 5^55" Sundays, gg* 



7:40AMi 
3:30 PM 
5:10PMl 



8:00 AM 
9:30 am 
5:00 pm 



Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 



Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyserville, 

Cloverdale. 



7:40 am 
3:30pm 



7:40a Ml 
3:30pm| 



H-rm a m I Pieta, Hop- 
8 -°° AM hand, Uklah. 



10:40 am 8:50am 
6:05 pm 10:30am 
7:30 PM 6:15PM 



8:00 a m I Guerneville I 



7:40AM| 
5:10PM 



8:00A M 
5:00 PM 



Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 



10:40am 
6 :05 p m 



7:40am| 
3:30 pm 



8:00am 
5:00 pm 



Sebastopol. 



110:40am 
I 6 :05 p M 



10:30am 
6:15pm 



10:40am 
6:05 PM 



8:50am 
6:15 pm 



10 30AM 
6:15 pm 



Stages connect at San Rafael for Bolinas. 

Stages oonnect at Geyserville for Skaggs 
Springs. 

Stages connect at Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Stages connect at Pieta for Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville, Soda Bay, and Lakeport. 

Stages connect at Hopland for Lakeport and 
Bartlett Springs. 

Stages connect at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, 
Blue Lakes. Laurel Del Lake, Upper Lake, 
Booneville, Greenwood, Orr's Hot Springs, Men- 
docino City, Fort Bragg, Usal. Westpnrt, Lay- 
tonville, Willitts, Capella, Pomo, Potter Valley, 
John Day's, Lierley's, Gravelly Valley, Harris, 
Blocksburg, Bridgeville, Hydesville, and Eureka 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates 

TICKET OFFICE— Corner New Montgomery 
and Market streets, under Palace Hotel. 



H. C. WHITING, 

Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Passenger Agent. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line-to New York, via Panama, 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. 

SAILINGS— AT Noon. 

From Company's wharf, First and Brannan Sts. 

S. S. "City of Sydney," July 18, 1895. 
S. S. "Sari Bias," July 29, 1895. 
S. S. "San Juan," August 8, 1895. 
S. S. "Colon," August 19, 1895. 
Japan and China Line for Yokohama and 
Hongkong. 
Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 
Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 
India, etc. 
SAILINGS at 3 p. M. 
S. S. "City of Rio de Janeiro," July 13, 1895. 
S. S. ''City of Peking," via Honolulu, August 3. 
S. S. "China," August 13, 1895. 
S. S. "Peru," September 3. 1895. 
Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the Company's 
office, No. 425 Market street. 

ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO 

For Japan and China. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 P M, for YOKOHAMA and 
HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
steamers for SHANGHAI. 

GAELIC Tuesday, July 23, 1895 

beixjic Saturday, August24, 1895 

Coptic (via Honolulu). . Thursday, Sept. 12, 1895 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 
For freight or passage apply at Company's 
office, No. 425 Market street, corner First. 

D. D. STUBBS, Secretary. 



10 Onto. 



Annual StiKnm'iitinn, Si.OO. 




t *N rRANCl*^ 







Vol. LI. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 1895. 



Number 3. 



FriMtrfaul Piblith,,! mm? MtunfOy fry UU proprietor. FISFIt HARRIOTT, 
eo**09-*13 Mtrrhnnl tlr- '- 

Tkt oJR<-< o/ ih* .VA'lt'.s- LBTTBR V )'■"■< n'/y Is Hi 

li'lil'tin'J. mt-tOt BrOOd '■ OH nun/ 

.1. - r'ftnl/ rati I 



T 



BE New Woman needs no chaperon; she is never in 
danger from men. 



IT is high time for some enterprising reporter to ask 
Tom Reed of Maine whether the abandonment of his 
moustache has any political significance. It is of such 
pertinent questions that interviews are commonly made 
up- 

IT is highly becoming in Governor Budd not to take any 
active part in the trial of the Fair will contest. Some 
Governors might want to take charge of the case in the 
court, but our Jim will be perfectly content with the fee of 
$100,000 or less. 

IT is rather odd that our laws make it a felony to sell 
liquor to an Indian, drunk or sober, while there is no 
restraint on the sale of grog to habitual drunkards, if not 
red men. There are thousands of white inebriates much 
more in need of protection than are the Indians. 

THE fact that the Park Commissioners have had the 
spur tracks retained in the park, for the express 
purpose of hauling fertilizing and other material to the 
grounds, has had no consideration from the enterprising 
journalists who "war upon the octopus." Why the 
Southern Pacific should leave those tracks in the park, 
save to oblige the Commissioners, is something that no 
fellow has yet found out. 

SACRAMENTO has good cause to rejoice over the suc- 
cessful inception of the greatest electrical undertak- 
ing in the United States. The transmission of power from 
Folsom, a distance of twenty miles, is accomplished at a 
loss of but twenty per cent, of the original water power, 
converted into electric energy. The triumph of this tre- 
mendous enterprise will lead to numerous like utilizations 
of the water power of the streams that flow down from 
our mountains, a source of prosperity that is almost bound- 
less in its possibilities. 

SOME people think that two dollars and a half is a 
large price to pay for the use of a berth in a Pullman 
sleeping car between this city and Los Angeles. They 
are in the habit of saying that railroad accommodations of 
all kinds are much cheaper in Europe. But the fact is 
that on the Lyons-Mediterranean railway the charge is 
eight or. nine dollars for one night's use of a berth in an in- 
ferior sort of sleeping car, in addition to the regular fare. 
As a whole, the railroad service in this country is better 
and cheaper than it is abroad. 

THE once beautiful Park fronting on Golden Gate 
avenue, between Gough and Laguna streets, has been 
dismantled of its inviting surroundings. For what pur- 
pose those tall shade trees, that served as a wind-break 
from every direction, were removed is not known, but it is 
a species of vandalism that is little short of criminal. This 
butchering business has practically destroyed the beauty 
and usefulness of the park and left it a barren common. 
The city needs all its public parks for play grounds for 
children, and they should be made attractive by shade 
trees and shrubbery. 



ftCCORDING t.. reccnl estimates, the revenue from (lie 
present taxes "ti spirituous and malt liquors and 

tobacco will suffice to run the government of the United 
States, after the payment of the public debt and the ex- 
tinguishment of the pension list. The men who smoke anil 

drink pay half the cost of the governmental expenditures 
for all purposes. 

ft LARGE irrigation enterprise is about to reach 
fruition in San Joaquin County. And it is also an- 
nounced that an irrigation company, with Senator Pelton 
at its head, is making preparations for extensive irriga- 
tion works in the Santa Clara valley. These are among 
the best means to build up the interior, and to make this 
city grow by adding to the population and productiveness 
of the tributary territory. 

IT is to be hoped that Senator White of California is not 
mistaken in his confidence that a Nicaragua canal bill 
will be passed by the next Congress. This canal is the 
chief need of the Pacific Coast, and its speedy construc- 
tion should be urged in all legitimate ways. Germany's 
example, in the case of the Kiel canal, is likely to stimulate 
Congress to a more lively appreciation of the importance 
of the Nicaragua enterprise. 

GOVERNOR BUDD has very properly decided that 
the various private military organizations in this 
State must submit to him copies of their by-laws and con- 
stitutions, and that their members must take the oath of 
allegiance to the constitutions of the United States and of 
this State. Unless they do this, he declares, he will cause 
their charters to be revoked. It is his intention to bring 
these various bodies under such regulations as will permit 
of their employment as adjuncts of the militia, in case of 
need. Another good intention of the Governor is that of 
forbidding the display of foreign flags by any of these or- 
ganizations, while on parade. 



THROUGH mismanagement the Mercantile Library, 
which is one of the finest and most useful on the Coast, 
is in debt to the extent of $75,000. The different Boards 
of Directors who have had the management of it, have 
never done anything to give it standing or make it self- 
sustaining. J. J. O'Brien is now one of the Directors, and 
Chairman of the committee to provide ways and means to 
pay off this debt. Being an active, public-spirited citizen, 
and one of the Directors of the Hibernia Savings and Loan 
Society, as well as a prominent dry goods merchant, he 
will exert his energy and influence to put this library on a 
paying basis and free it from the incubus of debt. His re- 
putation as a business man gives the assurance of success, 
and we would not be surprised to see the debt wiped out. 



THE law passed by the last Legislature governing the 
collection of taxes on persoual property unsecured by 
real estate has proved to be a healthy one for the city, as 
well as for the Assessor, who is entitled to six per cent, of 
the money collected. Assessor Siebe has collected, since 
the 15th of May last, $437,502.42, which he is prepared to 
turn into the city treasury. While he has made quite a 
handsome thing himself, he has performed a service to the 
city in securing so large a sum, much of the character of 
which was never collected under the old law, and he should 
be commended for the energy and efficiency with which he 
has applied his official services. His perquisites amount 
to $26,253.72, out of which he has to pay his army of assist- 
ants. Siebe is, undoubtedly, one of the most capable As- 
sessors San Francisco has ever had. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895. 



WEALTH AND POLITICS. 

THE reason given by Mayor Sutro for not, appointing 
James D. Phelan to the Election Commission was that 
the latter had " the misfortune to be a millionaire." That 
was the poorest of reasons, but it is one that has a great 
deal of practical force in our politics. The mob has to be 
considered in a country of manhood suffrage, and the mob 
docs not like millionaires. Nevertheless, there is no class 
which offers more promising material for office-holders 
than rich young men, especially those who have inherited 
their wealth. Often they are ambitious to gain distinction 
for something besides the possession of money, and this is 
an ambition that could be encouraged with much profit to 
the community. Such young men are, by their circum- 
stances, placed above the temptations to be corrupt which 
assail poor men. Commonly, they are well-educated; and 
if it were the custom with us to call on them to serve the 
public they would, without cost to the public, fit themselves 
for official duty. It is a regrettable, a dangerous fact, 
that the rich in the United States avoid participation in 
politics. The exceptions are few enough to be remarka- 
ble. We have no class analogous to the well-to-do men of 
England, nobles and commoners, who enter upon a public 
career as a matter of course. This is due in part to the 
absorption of American brains in business, and in part to 
the prejudice of the masses against the opulent. But we 
have a younger race growing up, sons of the rich, who pos- 
sess leisure, and do not share their fathers' fervor for 
money-getting, the spur of early necessity being absent. 
These, if they turn to politics, are met by the spirit which 
Mayor Sutro's sarcasm expressed; and it is not wonderful 
that, their patriotism being given such a reception, they 
should turn to lives of selfish pleasure, or find it agreeable 
to fall in with the view of the fashionable that it is not good 
form to be interested in politics. In a republic the ulti- 
mate security of wealth is the good will of the voters, 
and, if wealth shall continue to be associated in the 
popular mind with sentiments of hostility, there will be 
peril ahead. It was because the French nobility had 
divorced themselves from every feudal duty, while re- 
taining every feudal privilege, that the Revolution 
came. In a commercial community such as ours, where 
men make their own money, it is not strange that the pos- 
session of wealth should carry with it little of the old- 
fashioned sense of responsibility. Yet wealth without 
obligation is a challenge to the ill-will of the propertyless. 
That is inevitable. The best guard against envy is service. 
The demagogue is powerless against a rich man like Theo- 
dore Roosevelt, for instance, who works as hard for the 
public as if his livelihood depended upon it. William Wal- 
dorf Astor made a capital start as an American. He gave 
his mind to politics, ran for Congress, served as Minister 
to Italy, and, doubtless, would have made a respectable 
figure in his country's history but for two things — his ego- 
tism and the press. The first could not endure the jibes 
of the latter, which, to please the rabble, assailed with 
ridicule the young millionaire who had the audacity to 
strive to do his duty as a citizen. Astor, in his resent- 
ment, abandoned the United States and sought refuge in 
London. It is a good deal to ask, but the young man of 
wealth and family in New York or San Francisco who es- 
says to enter upon a life which is open to his poorer neigh- 
bors must expect to be the object of the newspapers' jests, 
if not abuse, for the daily newspapers live upon the poor 
and the nickels of the crowd. However, even that martyr- 
dom should not repel the strong. San Francisco has a 
large number of young men to whom fortunes have de- 
scended — young men who have received college training 
and who would not be insensible to the attractions of pub- 
lic honors. If half a dozen such men were in the Board of 
Supervisors — as they might and ought to be — we should 
for once have a rest from the corruption and charges of 
corruption which make the very name of municipal govern- 
ment odious. It ought to be apparent to thoughtful people 
what a tremendous gain it would be for this city if it should 
become the custom to invite young men of wealth to do 
public duty. A class would be created from which the 
best intelligence, the highest sense of honor, the least dan- 
ger of dishonesty, and the smallest tendency towards dema- 
gogy could lie reasonably looked for. So far from it being 
a ' ' misfortune ' ' in an aspiring young man to be a millionaire, 



it ought to be his best recommendation, for it is insurance 
against his being led astray by the influences which trans- 
form so many poor patriots into rogues after they have be- 
come office-holders. As for the old millionaires, that is dif- 
ferent. Their characters are formed, and their interests 
so intimately interlaced with those of other old rich men 
and corporations, that ordinary business interest unfits 
them for unselfish service. Our experiments with million- 
aires in the Senate have educated us as to this. But a 
young millionaire, with the enthusiasm, the ambition of 
his years, is the best material that our society affords. Be- 
ginning in modest stations, gaining promotion to higher, 
and in his maturity reaching the House, or the Senate, he 
would be suited in capacity and habitual purpose to be a 
leader. And leaders in our public life the rich must be- 
come if they are not to go on developing into an envied, 
distrusted, and hated class apart. There should be no 
class apart, rich or poor, in the United States. The exist- 
ence of a caste of the kind is at once unrepublican and an 
assurance of trouble to come. To be rich is not a crime, 
any more than it is a virtue to be poor. But wealth that 
is patriotic, and usefully patriotic, is the only kind that we 
should have — the only kind that is deserving of honor — in 
this free country. 

An Imbecile A newspaper when it tries can make 
Monarch. itself objectionable in a good many ways, 
but few journals have achieved the dis- 
tinction won by the San Francisco Examiner, which 
made use of the Fourth of July celebration to sneer 
at patriotism and, incidentally, to stir up the relig- 
ious animosities of the community. The most charitable 
view of its conduct is that it did not know what it was do- 
ing — that in its silly eagerness to do something unusual it 
fell into a pit dug by its own folly. In any case, no man 
of sense could read its reports of the procession — the best 
San Francisco has had in a decade — and of the literary 
exercises, without feeling an irritated contempt for a 
newspaper whose managers had no more sense than to 
set a lot of young, ignorant, and flippant reporters loose 
to turn the national holiday into ridicule. So gross a viola- 
tion of the rudiments of propriety helped to fix the Exami- 
ner in its place as the least serious and most brainless and 
irresponsible among our dailies. Everybody long ago 
ceased to expect from it journalism of the grown-up order, 
but not many were prepared to see it set about teaching 
the young that the Declaration of Independence is a joke, 
and Independence Day a bore. Doubtless it astonished the 
Examiner to find that its levity was resented in a spirit 
that had no levity in it, and it is gratifying to observe that 
it is scared as well as astonished. In its fright, however, 
it renders itself considerably more amusing than were its 
efforts to take a comic view of the Fourth of July. By way 
of explaining why it did not fly the stars and stripes on its 
office it lays its hand on its agitated heart and sobs out 
editorially that the money which otherwise would have 
gone for bunting had been, with great-hearted generosity, 
bestowed on the poor who were burned out lately. Also, 
in the fervor of its belated patriotism, it starts a subscrip- 
tion for the impoverished grand-daughter of the author of 
the "Star Spangled Banner. " What scares the feather- 
headed Examiner, though, is not the disapproval of that 
large portion of the community whose taste was offended 
by its stupid flippancy. It appears that the A. P. A. 
took it into its head that the paper's jeers at patriotism 
were intended to curry favor with the Catholics — who, 
according to the A. P. A. theory, sit up three hundred 
and sixty-five nights in the year to plot against American 
institutions. A sort of boycott has been inaugurated, and 
to the Examiner's terrified eyes the subscribing woods are 
full of hostile A. P. A. 's carrying vengeful meat-axes. In- 
stead of stiffening its back, man-fashion, and telling all 
boycotters to do their worst, this lily-livered "monarch" 
of the dailies drops upon its unkingly knees and begs for 
mercy. A malicious joker writes to it to inquire if it is 
true that "all Protestants have been discharged from the 
employ of the paper," and it actually answers in an agony 
of editorial earnestness that it requires no religious test 
in its office ! And agents from the paper are — after the 
dignified journalistic custom in vogue here — going about 
from house to house imploring the subscribers to please 



July jo, 1895. 



FRANCISCO NEWS l.l . 



i|ht au'iiin A \. 111 uninor 

to run foul of Father Sconlan, who damaged it-. 
since then it has, Bgura- 
gnnr t<> iiiu-ss .0,(1 , .viih pxcm 

and devotion. Hut for a year to come II 
may be expected to stand bat in hand to the A. IV \ - 
The Examiner spends ;i lot of money for the news, and it 
employs many capable writers, but expenditure and talent 
cannot Bave it from being equally absurd ami contemptible 
in its management, for it is without convictions or courage. 
It is so abject for the sake of nickels that it might be the 
paper of a starveling instead ol the property of a million- 
aire. In its present trouble, bromrbt upon it by its imbe- 
cile desire to do something striking, it is likely to sink far 
deeper in tin- Imiu of distress than it is at present, for the 
Catholics of San Francisco will not !»• apt to take kindly 
to the assumption that in ridiculing the Fourth of .Inly anil 
mocking at patriotism it was seeking to please them. 

Archbishop Riordan will have something to say about that, 
if necessary, ami if Archbishop Kiordan should frown at 

the Examiner Mr. Hearst would faint. 

Our Perfect The report of President Howard, of the 
Water Spring Valley Water Company, at the 

System. annual meeting of stockholders held on 
Wednesday last, was one of more than 
ordinary interest. It gives details of the operations of the 
company during the past year, and shows that the exten- 
sion of the pipe service covers a distance of fourteen miles. 
The prosecution of other extensive and valuable improve- 
ments is still going on, as they are determined to keep 
abreast of the times to meet the needs of the city as the 
law requires. The niggardly policy pursued by the Board 
of Supervisors during the past few years has compelled the 
company to draw heavily upon the great reserve fund, 
built up in 1889-90 by a suspension of payment of dividends, 
in order to meet the six per cent, payment on the capital 
stock. The decrease in this fund amounts to $509,158, so 
that now the profit and loss account has been reduced to 
$186,646, and during the past twelve months $16,540.75 
was withdrawn to meet this six per cent, payment on the 
capital stock. Notwithstanding all this the company has 
continued its policy of improving the service, and states 
that the supply for domestic purposes is adequate, and 
that San Francisco has a better fire protection, so far as 
water is concerned, than any city in the United States. 
This is particularly so as to pressure, the heights of the 
reservoirs being all the way from one hundred and fort}' to 
six hundred feet. Through the wise management of this 
company San Francisco has one of the most perfect water 
systems of any city in the country. 

Some Cant Some of the truly good clergymen of Chicago 
from have been greatly disturbed because Mrs. 

Chicago. Stanford has sold brandy for the benefit of 
the Stanford University. The brandy was 
made on the Vina estate, which is part of the endowment 
of the University. The most valuable part of the Vina 
ranch is the famous vineyard, with its winery and dis- 
tillery. The grapes grown in this vineyard are not suited 
to the production of fight wines, but are well adapted to 
the making of port and sherry. And from the sweet, 
strong wines of Vina a superior brandy is made. The de- 
mand for port and sherry is not such that the entire grape 
product of the vineyard can be profitably converted into 
these wines. There is, on the other hand, a good demand 
for pure brandy of proper age, particularly for medicinal 
purposes. The grapes of Vina cannot be made into 
raisins, as they are not of the variety suited to that pur- 
pose. These are the facts that have controlled Mrs. 
Stanford's decision to convert a part of this year's vintage 
into brandy. The preachers who profess to be shocked by 
this say that she might dispose of the product of the vine- 
yard in the form of " uhfermented juice of the grape." 
This is wholly impracticable. There is no general commercial 
demaud for grape juice. A small quantity of it is sold in 
the East, but its use is exceedingly restricted. The grape 
crop of Vina in a single year would supply the market for 
this unfermented grape juice for an entire century. The 
question narrows down to this: whether the University 
shall derive needed revenue from the sale of brandy, or be 
deprived of needed income and allow a valuable endow- 



""'"' ' . fanatical 

ini'iit against tl m of alcohol in any form. Mrs, 

Stanford, it should !„■ remembered, is merely a trustee in 
tin- matter Even wore she personally opposed to the use 
of wine or brand; -he could scarcely be justi- 

fied In cutting of , tin- University, for thai 

reason, The fact appears to be that unless brandy be 

made at Vino th -1 •. property there cannot t> 

pected to yield any return at all. In the past it has not 
paid expenses Seeing that about one half the revet 

the I nited States Government is derived from lav. sun 
beer, wine, spirits and tobacco, there would seem t,. 
impropriety in the receipt by an educational institution of 

support from the same source. Theory of the Chicago 
preachers is, in fact, mere cant. Not one of them would 
object to an endowment of his own church with monej 

made by the production of wine, whiskey or brandy. 

The Talk The Examiner's flamboyant declaration of 
of a hostility, apropos of a third term for Presi- 

Third Term, dent Cleveland, seems tohave been entirely 
uncalled for. There has been no sign of 
any intention on his pari to seek another nomination, and 
the editorial fulmination was directed against nothing 
more tangible than some vague newspaper gossip, excited 
by the visit, to the Pacific Coast of two officials from 
Washington. It would be time enough to assail Mr. 
Cleveland in this regard should he manifest any disposition 
to again become a Presidential candidate. There is ab- 
solutely no evidence that he cherishes such an idea; in 
fact, it is exceedingly unlikely that he looks upon another 
term in the White House as within the bounds of possibil- 
ity. Public sentiment in the United States was long since 
crystallized in opposition to a third term in the Presi- 
dential office for any man. And, save in some time of 
national peril, this unwritten law, established by custom 
and the force of distinguished patriotic examples, may 
never be suspended. No doubt Mr. Cleveland is as well 
aware of this as is anybody else. Even in his own party 
there is no pretence that liis renomination would be either 
desirable or necessary. And the President's most enthus- 
iastic admirers must perceive that any undertaking to se- 
cure for him another nomination at the hands of the 
Democracy would be to bring trouble and turmoil upon 
the party. Could that nomination be accomplished, there 
would remain the pi-ospect of defeat at the polls. A large 
and influential element of the Democracy would refrain 
from voting, rather than assent to a third term. How- 
ever, until something more definite than mere surmise and 
conjecture, on the part of press correspondents, arises to 
make this matter anything more than purely speculative, 
it is certainly in the worst of taste to make it the pretext 
for abuse of the President. It is entirely beyond the pro- 
vince of fair criticism to attack a public man, and hold 
him up to scorn and ridicule, for a cause which may have 
no existence save in the fertile imagination of Washington 
correspondents and their journalistic imitators on this 
coast. 

A Bonanza An article in one of the morning papers, 
For some days ago, described the dam and 

The Company, water power at Folsom, on the American 
river. It also gave an account of the al- 
leged delivery to Warden Aull of deeds that had been in 
escrow, conveying this valuable property to the State. The 
fact is that the dam and water power are owned by the 
Folsom Water Power Company. The State has nothing- 
more than a right to the perpetual use of a small part of 
the power developed by the dam. This right was granted 
by the company iu consideration of the convict labor used 
in the construction of the dam. It was a big bargain for 
the company, as the dam is worth at least $1,000,000, 
but the State will also profit by the work. In future con- 
tracts of the kind, however, it would be well to see that 
the State obtains a larger share of the benefit. In this in- 
stance a private corporation, possessing only an undevel- 
oped water right and a dam-site, has been provided with a 
property of great value without any large expenditure of 
its own. It is true that the convict labor might not have 
been employed in any better way, so far as the interests 
of the State were concerned, but it is probable that the 
State might have made a much better bargain. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895. 



The Late Society 6hould mourn when a kindly man 
A. N. Towne. dies. Such was Alban N. Towne, the 
manager of the Southern Pacific. He. 
occupied a station which brought him into contact with all 
kinds and conditions of men. He was the representative 
of a corporation which in its day has been unpopular. It 
developed upon him to justify a policy which shippers often 
condemned, aDd to refuse requests which were considered 
reasonable by those who preferred them. He never 
flinched in his duty to his stockholders, nor yielded an iota 
of what he deemed to be their right. Yet when he died, 
he had not an enemy; every man was his friend. 

When the A. R. U. insurrection broke out, a little over 
a year ago, Mr. Towne was the highest representative of 
his company on this coast. Both Mr. Huntington and Col. 
Crocker were in the East. The brunt of the conflict fell 
upon his shoulders. He was angry and indignant, as any 
man would be who saw the property confided to his care 
seized by irresponsible mobs, and the business which it was 
his duty to conduct broken up by bands of savages without 
excuse or pretext. He was very angry, and in the privacy 
of his office, lie expressed his thoughts in energetic Anglo- 
Saxon, but in public nothing ever disturbed his equanimity. 
He received committees of the strikers with a calm, if a 




.i/./;.i V .V. TOWNB 

serious, face, heard all they had to say without moving a 
muscle, and dismissed them with a firm though kindly ad- 
monition as to their folly. 

He had been a workman himself, and understood the 
feelings of workmen. In his youth he had had, more than 
once to choose between his duty and the usurped author- 
ity of a Labor union. His sympathies were naturally with 
his fellows, but his head was too level to admit for an in- 
stant that a gang of hired workmen can control property 
which they do not own. He used to tell a story of a 
younger brother whom he met one day on his way to a 
union meeting which intended to order a strike. "Where 
are you going, Ned?" asked A. N. "To the meeting, of 
course." "You aremistaken, you are not going." "Why 
am I not going?" "Because you have too much sense." 
"I say that I am going." "And I say that you are not." 
The younger brother hesitated; then with a muffled oath, 
turned on his steps and returned to his lodgings. He is now 
manager of one of Wisconsin's most prosperous railroads. 



The Decay Mr. Edgar Fawcett writes to the 

of New York Herald to say that the re- 

American Letters, cent sales of English fiction in this 
country have eclipsed those of like 
work by native authors, that this is indeed a gloomy time 
for the American novelist, and that the magazines, having 
ceased to be literary enterprises to become advertising 
circulars, form a tremendous combine for the discounte- 
nance and suppression of books. There is a great deal of 
truth in this. There is not at this time a single American 
novelist, or even a single writer on any subject who is 
making money enough by his pen to support a family. The 
chief composer of fiction in this country, Mr. Howells, is 
spreading himself all over creation and contributing to 
every periodical that will pay him, from heavy reviews to 
children's magazines; he is writing himself out in fact, 
simply because he cannot live on the proceeds of his novels. 
The audience which he used to address now gives its ear 
exclusively to the poorest and trashiest productions of 
English pens. From present appearances, the American 
school of letters will not last into the twentieth century; 
we shall import our books from London as we import our 
millinery from Paris. 

This is the work of the New York publishers. The 
Harpers, and the Appletons, and the Scribners, and the 
Putnams fancied they were proving their smartness by 
taking advantage of the simplicity of book writers, and 
grabbing the lion's share of the profits of the joint indus- 
try. They lived in purple and fine linen in brown stone 
fronts, and their wives took their airing in the park in 
eight-spring Daumonts; while poor devils of authors occu- 
pied upper back rooms in cheap boarding houses, and their 
wives wore the same gowns for years. It did not occur to 
the bloated publishers that they were killing the goose 
which laid golden eggs, and that people grow tired of 
starvation at last. They are now getting these truths 
into their thick skulls. The decay of American literature 
is involving the ruin of the American publishing industry. 
There is hardly a new firm of publishers that is solvent, 
and the old firms are living on the accumulations of former 
years. The subscription lists of the old magazines are 
falling off; they have degenerated into mere monthly picture 
books. The most profitable of them is Munsey's, which 
sells for ten cents, and is said to yield a cent a copy profit 
to its publishers. But none of them will survive. If we 
import our books from England, why not also our magazines? 

A Recognition In the selection of Dr. John F. Morse as 
of one of the members of the new Board of 

Special Merit. Health, Governor Budd has not dis- 
appointed the best expectations of his 
friends and the people of San Francisco. It was a choice 
eminently fitting, and is one among the many for which he 
has received praise. Dr. Morse is a native California!), 
born in Sacramento, and received his education in the 
schools of this State. He is a graduate of the Medical 
College of the Pacific, but was not satisfied with that. He 
went to Europe and became a graduate of Frederick 
Wilhelm University of Berlin, one of the most famous insti- 
tutions in the world. On returning he was chosen as 
surgeon of the German Hospital in this city, and has had 
charge of it ever since. Dr. Morse is a gentleman who can 
be classed as at the head of his profession, and his success 
in practice has been so marked that he has received the 
most flattering honors from his associates. He has served 
as President of the San Francisco Medical Society and of 
the California Academy of Medicine. He is also a member 
of both the American and State Medical Associations. He 
served for six years in the City and County Hospital. He is 
a gentleman who has sound ideas of reform which he will 
exert all his influence to have accomplished. His ambi- 
tion will be directed to a reform in the ambulance service, 
and every effort will be exerted to provide for the care 
and proper treatment of the unfortunates who may be 
placed in the City and County Receiving Hospitals. Be- 
ing a man in whom the people have the utmost confidence, 
their expectations will be realized. He is possessed of 
fine executive ability and excellent judgment, and his high 
professional standing is a guarantee that he will acquit him- 
self in the most meritorious manner, and urge every re- 
form in the service. 



July 20. 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LEI 



The Oottacle Tin In the way of the 

to rv in business is the 

Busmen Recovery, uncertainty which overhangs the 
•n of politicians. Merchants 
would bo prepared to expand their ventures, and maim 
faoturers to enlarge their plant, and to prepare tor our 
increased output s, if they could Feel certain that 

there would t>e no tampering at the next Congress with 
the tariff or the currency. All the signs |«>int to a revival 
which would ensure to enterprise a due reward Hut no 
one can feel certain that there will not lie some fool-tinker- 
ing by politicians with the tariff or the coinage, and prudent 
men postpone action until this danger is definitely averted. 
Commerce cries with one voire to the Republicans, "Hands 
off 1 " Will they heed the call? The peril arises from the 
exhaustion of the Republican ammunition chest. Of the 
long string of party principles which the party cinl>odiecl 
in its platform thirty years afro hardly one survives. They 
have all been worked out. or carried into effect, or aban- 
doned. Of the affirmative and negative assertions of 
doctrine on which Grant was elected, not one has any living 
force to-day. The Republican party has really no present 
excuse for existence. It respresents a dim memory of a 
dead issue, and appeals to voters on the ground that long 
years ago it was good and it was happy. That is not a 
valid mix,, n il'i in. The calculation of the working poli- 
ticians of the party is that by promising to re-enact the 
war tariff on the McKinley lines so as to swell the profits 
of the privileged class, a large sum of money may be ex- 
tracted from the manufacturers, while an equal sum may 
be screwed out of the silver miners by assurances that, 
under a Republican administration, the nation will buy 
their output at twice its value; that with these sinews of 
war. and a renewal of the ding-dong about protection be- 
ing the mainstay of wages, a sufficiently large vote may be 
captured to give Cleveland a Republican successor. There 
may be merit in the calculation. There is certainly enough 
plausibility in it to put heart into the Republican leaders, 
and to induce business men to go slow in the work of ex- 
pansion. If we could feel sure of Republican defeat next 
year, it would be safe betting that 1896 will be a year of 
great prosperity. As it is business men can only wait and 
watch. 

British Elections The election news from the British 
and Islands seems to have sent our contem- 

Their Results. poraries, both esteemed and un- 
esteemed, into convulsions in which 
they have given way to some very wild and senseless gab- 
ble. At the time of writing the elections which have been 
held only cover two hundred and ninety-nine seats. Out 
of these the Tories have secured two hundred, the Liberal- 
Unionists thirty-one, the Liberals forty-four, the Parnell- 
ites four, the McCarthyites twelve, and the Labor party 
eight. This shows an overwhelming majority in favor of 
Lord Salisbury's government, and would warrant one in 
designating the appeal to the country a veritable Water- 
loo, as it has been done by the daily press, if it were not 
for the fact that the elections that have been held so far 
form only about one-half of the constituencies that have to 
be consulted, and are in no sense representative of the 
political tone of those that are still to be heard from. In 
the general election of 1892 the early returns exhibited a 
Liberal defeat, and yet the new House of Commons con- 
tained a Gladstonean majority of about forty. All this is 
explained by the fact that the configuration of the present 
electoral system of Great Britain is such as to favor the 
Tories in the constituencies that are first appealed to and 
to favor the Liberals in the later contests. There is, 
therefore, at the time of writing, no absolute certainty 
that the new government has won at all, although the 
probabilities point so strongly in that direction that there 
cannot be said to be a reasonable doubt of it. There has 
been no such Liberal rout as the daily papers have sought 
to indicate, however. The trend of political sentiment has 
evidently been against the Liberals, but that is all. The 
present outlook is that the new Ministry will have an easy 
working majority in the new House of Commons, and will 
be able to hold possession of the reins of power for some 
years to come. This, however, is speculative opinion and 
is based upon as assumption of fact that are still to be veri- 
fied. That assumption of fact may turn out to be erroneous. 



Why the Liberal In looking into the future prospects of 

Party ,,••.- a Great Britain, it is 

Waa Beaten. ■•, . in order lobe reasonably ai 

curate, that we should intelligently 1111 
derstand the present situation and the causes which pin 

duced it. The British Liberals have been defeated because 
they were practically without leadership. The Liberal 
party is not in a condition of collapse, and the British peo 

pie have not abandoned Liberal principles. The Liberal 

party is demoralized because it is without a leadership 
that appeals to the popular support, just as it was in the 

early seventies, when Mr. Gladstone retired froi itive 

politics and left his political friends in charge of I. .nil 
Harlington. Nothing could be said against Lord Haiiing- 
ton. lie was a reputable man of marked ability in affairs 
of State, and his Liberalism had up to that time always 
been sound; but neither his name nor his utterances seemed 
to appeal to those who are the mainstay of the Liberal 

party. And so it has I n with Lord Roseberry. He is 

an able, man, and, apparently, an earnest. Liberal, but his 
party accepted him as leader with many mental reserva- 
tions, and his party following does not seem to have ac- 
cepted him at all. He was not, and is not, the natural 
leader of the Liberal party. In the nature of things, that 
position should have passed to Sir William Vernon Har- 
court when Mr. Gladstone retired. The pushing of Lord 
Roseberry to the front set the leaders to quarreling among 
themselves in a quiet way, and this in turn produced party 
apathy in the ranks. The result is shown in the falling off 
in the Liberal vote in the elections that have taken place. 
Men did not know what they were voting for when they 
voted for Liberal candidates, for the party had no pro- 
gramme in the field and the utterances of its three leading 
members showed that there was a lack of accord between 
them. To say, however, that the Liberal party has been 
discarded by the voters of Great Britain because it failed 
to keep its promises is untrue. The Liberal party has 
broken no promises. In so far as it failed to carry out its 
programme, it failed because the House of Lords, which is 
a Tory body, blocked its way, and not because of its un- 
faithfulness to its party pledges. One recent writer says 
that the Liberal party went into power upon " the crest 
of a wave of sympathy for Ireland and a deep-seated dis- 
content with the political condition and action of the House 
of Lords." This is grotesquely absurd. No question in 
regard to the House of Lords arose until after the rejec- 
tion of the Home Rule bill, and the mistake which Glad- 
stone then made was in not dissolving Parliament and ask- 
ing the opinion of the country upon that plain issue. Had 
he done so it is probable that the Liberals would have been 
beaten by a narrow majority, but the party would have 
been left in a better position than it is to-day. It was un- 
derstood at the time of the rejection of the Home Rule bill 
that it was the intention to push other measures embodied 
in the Newcastle programme (which were' of particular 
local interest to the English, Welsh, and Scotch constitu- 
encies) up to the House of Lords so as to have them re- 
jected, and thus accentuate popular antipathy toward 
that body. The whole scheme, however, seems to have 
miscarried, and, when the appeal to the country was taken, 
the acts which formed the basis of the complaint against 
the Lords were almost lost sight of. 



Affairs In The 

Balkans 

Looking More Lively. 



The attempted assassination of ex- 
Premier Stambuloff of Bulgaria is 
an incident of more than local or 
personal importance. The at- 
tempted assassination was undoubtedly inspired by politi- 
cal ambitions and purposes and the fact that politics in 
the Balkans are sufficiently lively to inspire such a crime 
is a very ominous fact. Stambuloff was an earnest op- 
ponent of Russian influences in Bulgaria and it is a recog- 
nized fact that Russian influences are making themselves 
more active in Bulgarian politics for some time past. The 
injured man was one of the ablest and most diplomatic 
politicians in Europe and for many years was the practi- 
cal ruler of Bulgaria. Although removed from office by 
Prince Ferdinand some months ago he was still a power in 
public affairs and was considered a dangerous person by 
the existing government. Whether this had anything to 
do with the murderous attack which was made upon him 
will doubtless appear later on. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895. 




WILLIAM Hounslow, other- 
wise Burglar Bill, followed his 
bundle of swag over the low window- 
sill on to the first-story veranda. Then 
he removed the somewhat warm and uncomfortable mask 
that coyly veiled his features from chance comers during 
active business hours and indulged in a self-congratulatory 
stretch. The haul had been highly satisfactory, but the 
delicacy of his situation and the enforced constraint of 
his attitudes had taxed alike his muscles and nerves. 

His indiscretion was momentary, but it sufficed. There 
was a hand on his arm and a voice in his ear — a woman's 
voice, as he recognized even as his hand went down to his 
revolver. 

"Oh, my gracious! Do come and help me! It's a 
burglar, I know, and I am so frightened! Oh, come, 
quick!" 

"But I — I don't know you, Miss!" stammered Bill, 
" rattled " at this appeal. 

"Goodness, no! Nor I you; but you're not going to 
stand on ceremony, are you? Here's the side door, and I 
want you to go over every foot of the house with me; and 
don't wake the baby, if you can help it!" 

"Trust me for that, Miss," he replied gallantly, falling 
into the spirit of the adventure. "I'm a very quiet and 
light-footed feller, and sometimes it seems as if the kids 
slept sounder'n ever when I'm 'round" — as he thought of 
the chloroform in his kit. 

"Oh, thank you! Would you mind going through the 
dining-room first, please. He's taken a lot; all the solid 
silver, I guess — though how they can tell it from the 
plated, with nothing but a dark lantern and being natur- 
ally in a hurry " 

"Just a minute, Miss, if you please. I know ladies are 
scared of firearms, but this is a ticklish job, and I'd like 
my revolver handy. Of course, it's against the law to 
carry concealed weapons, but I've a special permit, my 
regular business being dangerous like and taking me into 
some rum — excuse me, Miss — some rather queer places. 
There ain't an insurance company that would have me on 
their books. I'm an extra hazardous risk." 

" I knew you must be brave! But do be careful of that 
pistol, if you must have it out. Some men are horrid; 
they'll point one at you just for fun." 

You've no call to worry, Miss; I never fool with a 
weapon. When I point one it means business. But per- 
haps you wouldn't mind getting well 'round to the other 
side. I shouldn't like to have you too near in case of — of 
a row. 

" Oh, I hope you won't shoot anybody! Here's the 
library — you don't suppose he's under the lounge? " 

"Well, no, Miss I should say not. What with ladies 
looking under the bed regular before retiring, and it being 
cramped quarters anyhow — but you can look if you want 
to, Miss." 

" I'd rather you would." 

He regarded her reproachfully. "An' have a feller 
light ker-whack on my back? No, Miss; that's a risk I 
never take in my business. But you might poke this 
window-pole under, an' see what comes of it." 

A number of energetic proddings, accompanied by sup- 
pressed "Shoos!" and "Scats!" brought no response, 
however. 

" You're quite sure he isn't under it. " 

"I'll take my oath on it, Miss. Hullo, that door's 
shut! " 

" Yes, I shut and bolted it myself, behind me. There, 
I've unbolted it; would you mind opening it, please? " 

Very cautiously the gallant William walked up to the 
door, his cocked revolver covering the latch. "You can't 
be too careful, Miss," he observed. "A cracksman — er — 
a burglar, Miss — generally goes armed." 

"The awful wretches! But there! They do take their 
lives in their hands, don't they? And you can't blame 
them for being cautious " 



"Now, don't you get sentimental, Miss. Sentiment's 
always interfering with justice — as I know! " 

"How you must have suffered from it, to speak so 
bitterly! You have had many trials, have you not? " 

"Trials? Well, rather. But I've generally been aquit 
— ahem! Would you mind getting a little farther back, 
and rather more to the left, Miss? " 

One hand is on the door-knob, turning it with an almost 
imperceptible movement of the wrist; the other holds the 
revolver as in a vice, leveled full at the angle between the 
door and the jamb. The door opens half an inch or so to 
his slow and noiseless pressure — suddenly a weight drags 
down his right arm; there is a quick push, accompanied 
by the swish of drapery, and the door swings wide. Strong 
arms pinion his own behind his back, and a patrolman's 
revolver covers his forehead. 

" It's no use, my man. Drop it; game's up." 

This the young lady hears, vaguely, as from a far dis- 
tance, as she drops', fainting, under the patent burglar 
alarm that her fingers pressed ten minutes — or was it a 
year, or a century? — ago. 

****** 

Burglar Bill's sentence was for fifteen years. He gave 
the prison chaplain a full account of his latest misadven- 
ture in cracking a crib; and what he thought of his fair 
captor's proceedings is best told in his own words: 

"I'm not denying that the girl had pluck; all the same, 
sir, I'm glad, for the credit of our sex, that it was a wo- 
man. Of course, a man couldn't ha' done it; but if he 
could, he wouldn't. He wouldn't ha' had the cheek, an' 
he'd 'a 'been above taking in a feller that way. But wo- 
men — a woman's up to any manner of games." — Arthur 
Chamberlain in Vogue. 

Del Monte, Golden West, and Sierra are the three grades that give 
the best values in writing-papers. Berkshire is the best typewriting 
paper, and the Crown is the best fountain pen made. Sanborn, 
Vail & Co., 741 Market St., are the sole agents for all the above. 



La Bene Creole 



CIGARS 



10c. Straight 

2 for 25c. 

3 for 25c. 



Manufactured by 

S. Hernsheim Bros. & Co., New Orleans, La. 



Rinaldo Bros. & Go., 



Pacific Coast Agents, 

300-302 Battery St., S. F. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 



For sale by all first-class Wine 
Merchants and Grocers 



W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 123 California St 



July 20, 1S95. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE BIBLE AND THE AGNOSTICS. 

SUPERFICIAL '•■ currant events may W> 

.ir tliai the growth of agnosticism is 
by the increased ii l< r. -t t.iki'i! in the 
more unbelievers there are. the more Bible 
are round. At • lubs, ami in gatherings of 
intelligent and highly educated men. it i- quite rare to 
find one who confesses that )»• it. a member in good 
standing of a church, or thai he believes the doctrines 
which aro taught from the pulpit Men differ in their de- 
■". but a devout believer, who could honestly 
sign tin' thirty-nine articles, is a >"/■" an*. Simultane- 
the statistics of the publishing trade show that 
3,000,000 copies of the Bible are published every year in 
and alone, and that more than 200,000,000 copies in 
330 different languages are in circulation in the world at 
the present time. The explanation of the apparent anom- 
- that the spread of education increases the number 
■ >f persons who want to acquaint themselves with the oldest 
and. in many rc.-pccts. the most interesting book in the 
world, and that the discoveries of savants who have applied 
the rigorous te>t of historical criticism to the Scriptures. 
while they have disproved certain alleged facts, have really 
drawn public attention to the general work. There is noth- 
ing in ancient or modern literature which is so instructive 
and so interesting as the historical works of the Old Testa- 
ment, embracing the Pentateuch, and the books of judges, 
kin<_'s, and chronicles. Many of the statements therein 
must be dismissed as destitute of proof and impossible of 
belief, but these are not more numerous than the corre- 
sponding class of statements in Livy, or Suetonius, or 
Froissart ; while, after excising these doubtful passages, a 
picture of life remains, more graphic and more obviously 
true than can be found in any of the old historians. The 
Bible was not read as much in the last century as it is now, 
because it was less understood and because the priests, 
by adhering to their cast-iron rule of literal inspiration, 
disgusted readers who wanted to use their natural intelli- 
gence. Liberal churchmen in our day do not insist that 
the writers of the Bible were accomplished astronomers 
and geologists, and that they possessed, centuries before 
Christ, a knowledge of sciences which have only been de- 
veloped in our own times. They do not require their con- 
gregations to abdicate their common sense. And thus the 
number of Bible readers steadily increases and bids fair to 
increase in the future. 



THE survey of the Bay of San Francisco shows that 
from Mission Rock to Black Point there is a tidal cur- 
rent that absorbs and carries close to the shore the entire 
sewage and filth of the city. Any one who follows the con- 
tour of the water front can become familiar with this fact, 
and will understand that the water taken from the shore 
of the bay and used in tanks is unfit for bathing purposes. 
The management of the Lurline Baths, recognizing this 
fact, and to avoid it, have spent $200,000 in machinery to 
pump pure ocean water into the city to provide salt-water 
bathing. Their supply of water is pumped from the 
ocean, a distance of six hundred feet from shore. It 
passes through a sand separator, and, being heated to 
one hundred and four degrees in the tank, is free from all 
bacterial germs. Attached to these baths is a gymnasium 
with all the modern appliances for athletic exercises, and 
it is probably one of the most complete institutions of the 
kind in the United States. 



TO further perfect the Emergency Ambulance service 
inaugurated by the Doctor's Daughters, they have 
prevailed upon the Board of Supervisors to provide an- 
other pair of horses for night service. The Emergency 
Boxes for first aid to the injured, containing antidotes, 
stimulants and bandage, may be had by applying to Miss 
Crocker, 1609 Sutter street. Through the kindness of 
Mrs. Oelrichs and Miss Fair in providing an ambulance 
and horses, they have been stimulated to greater efforts 
in the work. 



Visit Laundry Farm, 
the terminus of the California Railway, Alameda Connty, for a pleas- 
ant day's outing, tt is one of the moat picturesque spots around the 
bay. No Sunday dancing and no liquors sold on the grounds. 



For Quaiitu. 
Tiavor and 

brilliancy 
Evans' 
file is 
unequaied. 



In Bottles or Direct from the Wood. 

C. H. Evans & Sons, Brewers and Bottlers, Hudson, New York. 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, 

Pacific Coast Agents, San Francisco, Portland, Los Angeles 



Warren White Sulphur Springs, 



VIRGINIA 



Season of 1395 
opens June 1st. 



C. W. CULLEN & SON, 
Owners and Proprietors. 

Eight different waters, namely: White, Red, and 
Blue Sulphur, Alum. Iron, Arsenic. Chalybeate, and 
Litbia On top of the " Three Top Range "of the 
Masamitten chain of Mountains. Elevation 2100 
feet above the sea. No Mosquitoes, Gnats, or 
Malaria. 

Tppmc, Per week, one person, $15; per month, one person, 
I 01 lllO i 340; two persons in one room $70. Special rates to 
parties of three or more. 
Good fishing, boating, and Bathing. Distance from 
Richmond & Danville Railroad, one mile; distance 
from Norfolk & Western, three miles; distance from 
Baltimore and Ohio, four miles. 

Oldest Summer Resort in the United States, Established 1734 

TH6 Stoneman House, 

yOSEMITE VALLEY. 

The only hotel in the valley supplied with all modern con- 
veniences and improvements. From the verandas of the 
Stoneman the following famous points are clearly visible: 
Eagle Peak, Yosemite Falls, Indian Canyon, Royal Arches, 
North Dome, Washington Column, Tenaya Canyon, Cloud's 
Rest, Half Dome, and Grizzly Moran and Glacier Points. 
The rates of this hotel are from $2 to $4 per day, according to 
room or European plan. The rooms are all newly furnished, 
the beds unsurpassed, the table excellent, and the entire 
management above criticism. 



J. J. COOK. Proprietor. 



Pope House 



SANTA CRUZ Cal. 



and COTTAGES. This well-known and popular 
Resort is now open for the reception of guests. 
Separate Cottages for families. Tennis and 
Croquet. Electric Cars to the beach and baths. 



VICHY SPRINGS 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. Three miles from 
@ Ukiah, the terminus of the S. F. and N. P. 

Railway. Only known natural electric water, 
Warm "champagne" baths. Situation, loca- 
tion, and scenery not surpassed. Terms, $12 to $14 per week. Post-omce 
and telephone at springs. WILLIAM DOOLAN, Proprietor. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG Z< CO., 

The Model 

American 

Caterers. 

1206 Sutter St., S. F. Telephone 23B8. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895. 




iQSdiigVflm 



"We Obey No Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

JJi R. Henry Arthur Jones has written his first comedy, 
/'V The Case of Rebellious Susan, in a style that is both 
finished and sparkling. But, like many things that sparkle 
and temporarily exhilarate, it leaves a slightly acrid taste in 
the mouth. Mr. Jones' play is productive of a certain 
amount of merriment for its auditors, and in this it fulfills 
its mission as comedy. But the true motive of the piece — 
and it would be as much a slight to our own intelligence as 
to Mr. Jones' to overlook it — is our esteemed friend of 
modern days, who, like the recurrent feline of popular 
song, seems ever to be with us— the social problem. Mr. 
Jones' problem is historic; and. admitting its necessity, 
daintily handled. 

James Harabin does the conventional thing of being un- 
true to Susan, his wife. Discovering this, Susan avows 
her intention of playing even. So, with complacent new 

womanl I. she leaves her husband's house, goes abroad, 

and accepts the devotion of the first good-lookiug fellow 
who offers himself. It is carefully stipulated in the lines 
that Susan's indiscretion does not attain absolute un- 
ehastity; but it reaches a state of rapturous osculation 
and reckless abandon that places her morality in rather a 
weird state of uncertainty until, in the closing scene, she 
proclaims her innocence, which is cheering news, for her 
lover had been true for only three weeks, at the expira- 
tion of which time he was safely engaged to another woman. 
Following the quaint sex inversion that Susan has assumed, 
she permits her husband to forgive her of what he is bliss- 
fully ignorant. And here the play ends. In this last scene 
Susan has a line that is a key to the problem: "I want to 
be loved." 

Mr. Jones maintains an easy neutrality throughout. 
With clean-cut art he tells his story and cautiously avoids 
its explanation. We are left to our own deductions. Like 
climbing a flight of stairs in darkness — up, up, step by 
step, never discovering the landing above until an abrupt 
lurch into space and the realization that one has gone a 
step too high — so with "Susan"; she halts abruptly. A 
continuation would only mean a new lapse of caution on Mr. 
Harabin's part, a new lover, and the whole play over 
again. Susan is a question of temperament. She had a 
narrow escape, but it will not do her a particle of good. 
* * * 

In the hands of any but a body of first-class players, The 
Case of Rebellious Susan would be very tiresome. There 
are solo passages (if one may use the term) in the play 
that were intended for artists, and we may thank Mr. 
Frohman's company for a production that merited a 
warmer reception than that given the opening perform- 
ance at the Baldwin. Mr. Kelcey makes us forget that he 
is a leading man. His absence of consciousness, his easy 
assumption of the authority a middle-aged man of the 
world wears so often for his youuger relations, and above 
all the happy faculty of merging his identity in the com- 
bined effect of the ensemble— for Mr. Kelcey is artist 
enough to know the value of a potent tone in the back- 
ground — all of these give him an identification with the 
cynical Sir Richard Kato that is the absolute realism of 
stage character, where art is known only by the seeming 
absence of its methods. Stage cynics are usually as un- 
real as their brothers in actual life. Mr. Kelcey's is sin- 
cere; and the touching scene with Mrs. Quesnel in the last 
act is a splendid burst of consistent inconsistency. Susan, 
impulsive, mettlesome, febrile and vivacious, finds a sym- 
pathetic temperament in Miss Irving. What might be 
considered over-acting in some of her scenes, is the same 
evidence of a marked personality that has characterized 
all of her former efforts. Miss Irving cannot disguise her 
natural self, and as Susan she happily does not have to try. 
Elaine Shrimpton and Fergusson Pybus have a little 
"case" of their own that has no bearing on Susan's, but 
lends color in the way of a humorous contrast. Miss 
Shrimpton is modeled on the most recent of her species 
and marries a creature of the epicene sort who should be 



an everlasting blessing to a woman of her newness. But 
he is not; no one seems to get along with any one else in 
Rebellious Susan. Miss Tyree treats Miss Shrimpton in a 
way to bring but little sympathy for her cause. Mr. 
Williams' only fault is that in softening his voice to con- 
trast with that mighty organ of his wife's, his lines are 
many of them inaudible. One can drop into the theatre at 
any stage of the play and see at a glance that Mr. Grattan 
is a guilty man. He has the limberness of dejection and a 
droop of the head that fits better the crime of murder than 
infidelity in this end of the century. If one may judge 
from the rare glimpses obtainable of Mr. Grattan's face, 
it is quite a handsome one — at least preferable to the top 
of his head. Mr. Le iloyne brings a rough, hearty cordi- 
ality with him whenever he comes upon the stage. As Sir 
Joseph Darby his acting was well up to the high standard he 
has established for us. Miss Irish distinguished herself in 
the scene with Mr. Kelcey in the last act. It was a 
fine effort and deserved the applause it brought her. 
Praise is also due Mr. Hale, who played Lucien Edensor, 
for his admirable work in the parting scene in the second 

act. 



Balfe's well known opera Satanella has been doing a big 
business at the Tivoli this week. Particular praise is due 
the scenery and effects by means of which the super- 
natural features of the piece were made a splendid 
spectacle. Martin Pache, the new tenor, appeared as 
Rupert and created a favorable impression. Alice Nielson 
has been singing the title role this week and makes quite a 
showing in that pretentious part considering the short 
preparation she was allowed. Another new star, W. H. 
Kinross was very good as the demon King. Raffael, 
Hartman and all of the Tivoli favorites are in the cast. 

Satanella has taken so well at the Tivoli that it will be 
continued next week. 

Special attractions will be offered at El Campo, the popular Bay 
resort, on Sunday next at 1:30 p. m. A thrilling exhibition of the 
"United States Life-Saving Service," and a "Ileal Shipwreck on the 
Bay." Other amusements as usual. Fare: round trip twenty-five 
cents; children fifteen cents. The steamer Ukiah leaves Tiburon 
ferry at 10:30 a. m., 12:10 and 1:00 p. M. Returning, leaves El Campo 
at 1:00, 3:00 and 5:00 p. m. 

B| J ' /~r*| 1 An. Hay.man & Co., (Incorporated) 

aldvVin I neatre- proprietors. 

Monday. July 2£d Matinee Saturday only Second week of 
DANIEL FROHMAN'S LYCEUM THEATRE COMPANY. 
First time here « » i' 

THE AMAZONS. 

By Arthur W Piueio. 

Next week—Last week of Lyceum Co , AN IDEAL HUSBAND, 

by the author of " Lady Windermere's Fau " 

Gl'r ' TL J Al, Hayman & Co.. (Incorporated) 

alitornia I neatre- proprietors. 

Monday next, second week A great big laughing hit HOYT'S 
latest farce-comedy creation, 

A BLAGK SHEEP. 

With Otis Harlan as "Hot Stuff " 
New Sougs, dances, etc. 

G| I ' /-Ti 1 The " Gem" Theatre of the Coast. 

OlUmDia 1 neatre- Friectlauder.Gottlob&Co., Lessees 
and Managers. 
The last great laughing success of the Frawley Company sea- 
sou Week July 22d, Boucicault's brilliant comedy. 

THE cJILT. 

Five wonderful acts Fourteen splendid characters 
Week July Attn— THE ENSIGN 

Our popular prices— Night, 15c, 25c, 50c 75c. Saturday mati- 
nee, 15c, Sao., 50o. 



San Francisco, 
Cal 



Mechanics' I nstitute. 

28th INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



Opens August lath and closes September 14th, I8i)5 

Grand display of Home productions in art, science, and manu 

factuns 

Intending exhibitors should at once apply for space, for which 

there is no charge 

PRIVILEGES— Several bids l,>r the following exclusive privi- 
leges will be received by the committee until Tuesday, July 83d 
at 6 P m : Restaurant, ice-cream, soda, candy, root beer, waffles, 
pop-corn, perfumrry 

For specifications or any desired information apply at the office, 
31 Post St A S HALLIDIE, President 



Jul> 
Mr. rJ 

plot tlian Is 
in no wav I 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS U TTKR 



.t :!4U"i fai 

.1 Hint ■■ S 
i- wiili .Mr Boyt, and 

■ tin' inin 



fun that he has sprinkled plentifully through the pieee. 
The varii ' in evidence as in the 

Hoyt, but there Is any quantity <>f funny 
and bright lines I '■ - Harlan bas a f/nmlH 
■ ■'. the good things in the farce, and be accepts 
the responsibility in a mosl and hilarious manner. 

With the peculiarly high-pitched voice so often found in 
bodied cow-boys and tough citizens generally, he 
Hoi Stuff" a peppery humor thai makes things hum 
in real cow-boy style. Harlan has a most original and ef- 
fective style of singing the jingley songs that fall to him. 

He maintains a pianissimo throughout, which, with a re 

markably clear articulation, is very telling. William De 

Goodfellow Gunniug," editor of the Tombstone 

prion, about >even feet in height and proportionately 

muscular. Hence, his valuable publication is never averse 

to calling a spade a spade. Barring a too realistic use of 

the Arisonian, "be damned," Mr. be Vere is the best of 

the support. Hoyt's girls, who never grow big enough to 

wear lon<r skirts, are all there, ably headed by Laura 

Bigger, who makes a capital queen of burlesque, There 

- ime good choruses and excellent dancing. 

* # * 

Branson Howard's Om of Our Girh is not full of that 
crisp modernity that is stamped on must of his plays. He 
endeavors to depict the difference between the French and 
the English speaking nations in their treatment of girls. 
and the result is marked exaggeration of French customs, 
aggravated by patriotism and prejudice. While in noway 
championing the social code of France, we cannot but say 
that Mr. Howard has given them an unfair deal. A bad 
feature of the play is the minute details that the French 
characters go into to explain the peculiar restrictions and 
liberties of their social life. As we are to understand 
these to be bred in their bones, it is unnatural that they 
spend half of their lives explaining them. Helen Dauvray's 
part is a blending of corned}' and seriousness. She does 
better in the serious places — except at the desk when she 
writes a letter to her father, and commencing with a mild 
giggle, crescendos into peals of laughter, that immediately 
proves contagious to the audience — for in the lighter parts 
her methods are overdrawn and wearying. Long resi- 
dence abroad has given her speech a decided accent of the 
country she ridicules. This gives a continuously droll in- 
congruity to her acting. The Frawley Company has never 
been seen in a piece more unfitted to its members. George 
Osbourne alone is well cast. As the Comte de Grebillion 
he has a character that for make-up and impersonation 
could not be improved. Frawley, King, Leslie, and even 
Mr. Arbuckle are outside the lines of probability. Miss 
Ross is too weak for Julie and Miss McAllister can do much 
better work. 

* # # 

The second week of the Lyceum Company at the Bald- 
win will begin Monday with the production of Pinero's 
farcical comedy, The Amazons. The play is spoken of as 
one of the most graceful and delicately fantastic that ever 
came from the Pinero pen. It was a great success at the 
company's home theatre, The Lyceum, in New York. 
Oscar Wilde's An Ideal Husband follows. 

Dion Boucicault's famous racing comedy, The Jilt, is the 
attraction at the Columbia for next week. The cast in- 
cludes the entire Frawley company, George Osbourne, 
and Katherine Grey, who have been specially engaged. 

A Black Sheep will commence its second week at the 
California on Monday night. The farce has made a hit 
and will no doubt add another week of crowded houses. 

The opening exercises of the Mechanics' Institute will be 
held on the afternoon of August 13th at the Columbia 
Theatre. 

The Old Homestead has enjoyed a profitable week over 
at the Macdonough Theatre in Oakland. 

The Marquis of Salisbury has a beautiful villa just a mile from 
Monte Carlo, which he bought from the Moet & Chandon Cham- 
pagne firm ten years ago for forty thousand pounds. 




A Lb 

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Paris Expos- 
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BOTTLING CELLARS— Larkin and McAllister Sts., S. F. 
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THURSDAY and FRIDAY, August 1st aud 2d, 
From 2 to 4 P M. 



Tivoli Opera House. 



Mrs. Ernestine Kreling, 

Proprietor and Manager 
To-night. Artistic rendition of Balfe's melodious opera in five 
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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER- 



July 20, 1895. 



^d 00 Her- 0n 



WHILE it is for several reasons to be regretted that 
the Cornell crew broke down so entirely at Henley 
regatta, all competent judges of rowing, who are familiar 
with the course from Regatta Island to Henley Bridge, 
fully expected the American representatives to be beaten. 
It was said that the Cornell crew had rowed one-and-a- 
half miles on the still waters of a lake in less than seven 
minutes, while seven-and-one-half minutes is about the 
average time for the winning boat in the Grand Challenge 
Cup. But the people who built great hopes on this were 
evidently ignorant that the race at Henley is rowed 
against the stream, which is often quite strong in the 
Thames. Further, the short stroke and lack of swing of 
the Cornell men were fatal defects. The University of 
Cambridge, with half the athletic young men of England to 
pick from, but rowing a short stroke, lost for nine conse- 
cutive years — from 1862 to 1869 inclusive — the boat-race 
against the University of Oxford, rowing a long stroke. 
In 1869 the famous Oxford coach, Morrison, went over to 
Cambridge, and persuaded the demoralized Cantabs to 
adopt the long stroke of the Dark Blues. In 1870 Cam- 
bridge won the race, and continued to do so for four years 
thereafter. From 1870 to 1895 Cambridge has won 
twelve races against Oxford's thirteen, setting aside the 
dead heat. It is not to be supposed that any single 
American University or College has anything like the 
amount of good athletic material to pick a crew from that 
the University of Cambridge has, and how the Cornell 
men could expect to beat the best Oxford and Cambridge 
college crews with a style discarded a quarter of a cen- 
tury ago at Cambridge after a most exhaustive series of 
trials is somewhat hard to understand. The theory of 
how to row is not a thing to argue about; it is practically 
settled beyond dispute. The style adopted by all the 
crews at Eton (the great rowing school of England), at 
the twenty-one Colleges and four Halls of Oxford, and at 
the seventeen Colleges of Cambridge, is almost precisely 
the same; as is shown by the facts that several Oxford 
University Eights have been coached by the Rev. Edmond 
Warre, assistant-master, and afterwards head master, of 
Eton, and that College Eights at Oxford have been coached 
by Cambridge University oars: which would be impossible 
if there were any serious differences. All the leading 
Australian rowing clubs, being captained and coached by 
men who have rowed in their University or College Eights 
in England, adopt the same style. The crew which wins 
the Grand Challenge Cup represents the best of forty-two 
Eights at Oxford and Cambridge alone, not to take any 
account of Eton and the great rowing clubs on the Thames. 
If all these are agreed as to the best way in which to get 
pace out of a boat, the style evolved at a single American 
college is scarcely to be set against this consensus. 
* # * 

Probably there is no man in this State who has done 
more hard and earnest work in his line thanW. B. Carr, 
who has lately come into the possession of his proportion 
of the fruits of his labor in connection with J. B. Haggin. 
Away back in the early seventies Carr became an expert 
as a iobbyist at Sacramento, and so completely outdid the 
notorious Nat Broughton of Solano that the latter had to 
retire from the profession. Many incidents might be re- 
lated exhibiting his shrewdness as a manipulator of men. 
He studied character as a student would apply himself in 
solving the most intricate mathematical problems. On 
one occasion during the session of 1873-4, when there was 
such bitter contention between certain elements and the 
Central Pacific Railroad Company on the question of 
freights and fares, a bill was before the Senate which 
Carr was laboring to have defeated. There was a very 
radical and bitter anti-monopolist sitting as a member from 
one of the mountain counties who was vigorously opposed 
to the corporation, and an advocate of the bill. The 
Senate was about equally divided, only requiring one vote 
either way. Having studied his peculiar character, Can- 
singled him out for his victim. His name appeared well 



down in the list on the roll-call, and while the vote was be- 
ing taken Carr stepped up behind him and whispered in 
his ear: "Senator, for God's sake vote for this bill." 
The Senator looked at him as he walked away, and was so 
completely dumbfounded that he changed his mind. He 
concluded he was mistaken in the character of the bill, and 
when his name was called he voted against it, fearing 
there might be a joker in it. His vote killed the bill, and 
Carr had accomplished his object. That Senator was 
never re-elected. 

Carr became so proficient in his work that he concluded 
to transfer his field of operations to Washington, and the 
scheme that directed him was the enactment of a desert 
land law. In this he made a study of the situation and 
concluded that he could be more effectual at a distance 
than coming in contact with the more dignified national 
representatives. Horace F. Page was in Congress, and 
Carr was his friend. The scheme was one in which there 
was millions, and he had in the background the power of 
capital. The picture of the desert being made to "bloom 
and blossom as the rose" enchanted the Congressmen, and 
the law was passed. The vast plains of the Kern delta 
were as rich and productive as the valley of the Nile if 
energy and enterprise were properly directed, and under 
this law almost half a million of acres were located, and 
was known as the Carr and Haggin ranch. A powerful 
syndicate took possession, and through a grand system of 
irrigation costing millions of dollars, the desert and sheep 
ranch became a vast farm of green fields and oi-chards in 
a few years. It was a reclamation almost as splendid 
as the scheme of redemption. Carr retired as a lobbyist 
and became an humble husbandman, engaged in pastoral 
pursuit, and the money of J. B. Haggin, Lloyd Tevis, and 
William Hearst, coupled with the genius of W. B. Carr, 
wrought the transformation and the arid plains became a 
scene of productive energy. Of course, people denounced 
it as a " land-grab," not accounting for the wealth it pro- 
duced. A few weeks ago a partial division was effected, 
and the genius that had produced the grand results was 
awarded one million dollars and withdrew from the com- 
pany, while many millions remain. No one will envy him 
the elegant leisure "By Gosh" Carr has earned, and is 
now in position to enjoy after years of toil. 

* * * 

It is only charitable to suppose that the exhilaration 
caused by the vacation tendered the most popular school 
teachers by a contemporary, has made them temporarily 
forget a good deal of the English which they teach for ten 
months of the year. Their correspondence from various 
parts of the State would hardly be marked seventy per 
cent, as a school boy composition. Here is one example 
out of fifty, "sweeter music than ever organ or flute 
pealed forth." A flute pealing is good. Here is another: 
"The girls in the dining room are most faithful etc. and 
no one could display more general solicitude for yowr 
general comfort." Another teacher who went fishing re- 
marks: " I only held the rod while the trout bit a sort of 
nickel-in-the-slot affair." This is probably a new name for 
a worm. The same teacher is also " a connoisseur in ham- 
mocks." Some of them too are alliterative and write 
about "deliverance from dire disease," but the majority 
mount a sixteen-hand-high Pegasus and murmur of " ver- 
durous paths" "silent glades," and the cares of tired 
nerves seeming to slip away to the usual accompaniment 
of " feathered choristers " and "the gentlest of zephyrs." 
One is puzzled too to know how the appointments of a 
hotel can be in keeping with its location. However as 
long as the school-ma'ams and school-masters are having a 
good time they may be pardoned for dropping into poetry 

<( la Silas Wegg. 

* # * 

An incident in the life of the late A. N. Towne, which oc- 
curred while he was a Division Superintendent of the Chi- 
cago and Great Eastern Railroad, illustrates his character, 
as well as the esteem in which he was held by his superiors 
He was naturally modest and reserved, and never thought 
that he could perform his duties too well. He was sum- 
moned peremptorily to the office of the Superintendent, no 

The importations during 1894 of G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Extra Dry Cham 
pagne aggregate 80,778 cases, or 44,7&4 cases more than any other brand. 
Its 1889 vintage attracts great attention for remarkable quality, natural 
dryness, and purity. 



July jo. 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



char.- v \vi>nl >>f 

i< 'villi; 
that his term • •:' 

The Superintendent, know ■ and thinking to 

Is nerve, addressed ' ■ .1 ttern rolce, l>nt with ;> 
twinkle in his eye: "Mr. 1 dUsobarged from 

your position ;i> Division Superintendent." 

"May! ask, Baid Mr. Towne, '* what the charge agatnsl 
mo 

tainly." replied the superintendent, appreciating 
the earnest and manly way In which the question was 
asked. •You are entitled to know the reason for this act. 
Iha\- I with the President ami manager of the 

road, and as I wanted an efficient assistant, we concluded 
that you were the besi equipped for the place, and here- 
after your duties will be enlarged in connection with the 
management of the road." 

It i- needless to say that the surprise was greater than 
the expectation, and very soon afterward he was the chief 
in that department. 

# * # 

The camp of the Bohemian Club for the Midsummer 
High Jinks at Meeker's Grove, opened this morning. The 
celebration of the forest ceremonies will not take place 
until August 3d, but in the interval a number of the mem- 
will avail themselves of the chance of a pleasant forest 
camp. There is always a friendly rivalry in Bohemia in 
regard to the artistic and fantastic adornment of the tents 
for weeks before the artistic element of the club is called 
into counsel. Some times a single flash of genius will se- 
cure for the tent owner the proud distinction of perfect 
originality. Joullin. Stanton, and Matthews have been en- 
listed this year in devising banners and titles for the can- 
vas mansions of Bohemia. One of John Stanton's crea- 
tions which will appear this year on the trunk of one of the 
gigantic sequoias is a lady with her hands before her eyes 
pointing towards a secluded portion of the wood. The 
early visitors to the grove this season can amuse them- 
selves with bass fishing, for the reach of river by the bath- 
ing place is full of this game and delicious fish. So far the 
veil of mystery hangs over the ceremony of both high and 
low jinks. Something very fine is promised, but its nature 
will not be disclosed until the da}' of its event. This is act- 
ing on the principle that all the members of Bohemia are 
children and should be treated as such. 
# # * 

This has been a stormy week at the University Club. 
When that institution first started, its rules and regula- 
tions were drawn up on the most cast-iron principles. It 
was to be organized and conducted on precisely the same 
lines as the University Club of New York. None but the 
properly accredited graduates of universities or colleges 
were to be admitted. It was to be the conservative club 
of the city, and its membership was not to exceed a cer- 
tain number. But now the bars are down and the Uni- 
versity Club, while a highly respectable organization, has 
lost its title to be considered as an association purely of 
college and university men. 

# # # 

The Burlingame Club has taken a fresh start since the 
arrival of Walter Hobart. There is really a lot of "go" 
about this young man. While an enthusiastic horseman he 
is at the same time a close student, andif there were a few 
more like him at Burlingame, the "go-aheadativeness" of 
the club would be vastly improved. The pace is too slow 
in the promotion of the manly sports which was the object 
of the club's existence in the first place. It is simmering 
down to a luncheon club, the golf links has lost its attrac- 
tion, the polo ponies are pining in their stalls, and the club 
is not keeping up to the high standard it established. 

After dinner try Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum. 
will find it admirable. 



You 



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Whether it is a corsage bouquet, a dinner table decoration, flow- 
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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895. 




WHEN one hears the announcement that "a correct 
list of nice people " is about to be put forth to the 
public under the immediate patronage of Mr. Ed. Green- 
way, whose personal care will be given to its production, 
every one at all familiar with the society of which that gen- 
tleman occupies the distinguished position of leader, will 
regret that, for the benefit of the same social world, Mr. 
Greenway's efforts should not have been directed in the 
line of social hints on behaviors, dress, custom, honored 
alike in the breach or in observance — in short, all the 
minutiae of polite society summed up in the words "good 
breeding." A book of this kind would be a real boon to the 
swim, for is not Mr. Greenway an acknowleged authority 
within its circle; and who would dispute his dictum ? 

* * # 

It would be pitiful were it not ludicrous to witness the 
frantic efforts of little Belvedere to keep its Night in 
Venice "exceedingly exclusive,'' the exact meaning of 
which, in such a settlement at this fin de siecle period, is 
rather difficult to understand. If trade is the contamina- 
ting element to be feared, what will be done with some of 
the peninsula's residents? If frisky behavior: ditto, if 
millionaires alone are eligible for a place on the invitation 
list, the guests will not be numerous at this season of the 
year. Some one suggests that the Daughters of the Revo- 
lution will swell the crowd. Possibly this is the solution of 
the puzzle to the outsiders. 

* # # 

What a pity it is that as our reading community swal- 
low with avidity any item regarding swagger people in 
England, the news gatherers of social items is not often in 
a position to speak by the card, but picks up stray gossip 
on the very outer edge of aristocratic functions. Any one 
familiar with the inner circle of the upper crust of Lon- 
don's aristocracy will be aware that the Cunards do not 
belong there, and the idea of the recently transplanted 
wife of Sir Bache being a leading belle in Royal circles (vidt 
the Examiner's correspondent) is simply ludicrous. 

* * * 

It would be a safe bet that two new stars in the social 
firmament will be — nay, already are — the charming sisters 
Williams, who, as nieces of General Forsythe and under his 
care at Del Monte during the military encampment, will 
shine with especial lustre. The very stylish appearance 
of one sister and che girlish prettiness of the other, would 
entitle them to admiration on their own account, but of 
course it goes without saying their distinguished guardian 
will be quite a feather in the caps of those San Rafael girls. 

* # * 

Slowly, but surely, Mrs. Bessie Paxton is working to 
the front. Her latest triumph was her artistic singing at 
Donald de V. Graham's charming " afternoon " last Satur- 
day. The gallant host was in fine voice and delighted his 
many admirers with several songs. The dilettante regret 
that Mrs. Younger does not play more frequently on such 
occasions. Miss Alice Ames was the violin soloist. 

* * * 

Everything indicates that Miss Mary Kip will be a pro- 
nounced belle in the season of 1895-6. Her success at San 
Rafael has been unequivocal. Not alone is she a striking 
beauty, but a most vivacious one as well, her bright face 
and witty sallies being a centre of delighted beaux every 
evening after dinner at the Hotel Rafael. 

* * * 

Miss Genevieve Goad has also scored a social triumph at 
the same hostelry. The pity is, the young ladies' admirers 
are not old enough or rich enough to settle down in matri- 
mony. To be sure, young Martin can say yes to the latter, 
but, like all sons of wealthy mamas, he is disinclined to 
leave her side eti permanence for a while yet. 



Handsome Frank Carolan and wife will soon bid adieu to 
San Francisco, and make their home on " the avenue " in 
Chicago. When the " beautiful eyes " married the daugh- 
ter of the car-famed papa, people thought he had done 
well and wisely, but. since knowing papa did nothing for 
the young people, minds have changed about the clever- 
ness of the speculation. However, since the environment 
of the far. far West has become intolerable to the fair 
Chicagonese. the millionaire father has been prevailed 
upon to put Frank upon his feet, hence the departure. 
What a pity that, during her temporary intolerable exist- 
ence here, she could not have endeared herself more to 
those who once so charmingly made her welcome. 
# * * 

Besides claiming the Frank Cardans, Lieutenant Bertsch 
and bride, Chicago now adds Lieutenant Strother to her 
list. Strother was extremely popular while here. There 
can be no mistake about that question, which has been too 
well verified on more than one occasion. Now speculation 
runs rife about the one who takes the vacancy. Anyway, 
the girls still have Wilcox to gush over, so that is some 
consolation, even if they do have him on the unsatisfactory 
installment plan. On ait that he failed to nibble at the 
many bits while on his visit to Castle Crags; in conse- 
quence, all idea of army life has been knocked into a 
cocked-hat for the belle of the Crags. 
* * * 

Perhaps Alice Rix did not give Castle Crags a scorching 
in last week's Examiner! The girls are bubbling over with 
wrath at the very idea that their manners are said to re 
semble those of the Sunday picnic girls; that they are 
dowdy, and so unattractive that even the Brownies find 
no pleasure in journeying up to see them. If good looks, 
gracious manners, and clever personalities are denied 
them, they can at least console themselves with their purse 
strings, as they hithertofore have happily done, knowing 
that every cloud has a silver lining, notwithstanding the 
frank criticism that is occasionally whirled in that direc- 
tion. 

* * * 

Gossip among the San Mateo and Burlingame contin- 
gents are wondering if anything will come of the attach- 
ment handsome, moon-eyed Charlie formed, long ago, for 
the blonde Madonna. She is so calmly, grandly beautiful, 
no one blames him for his intense admiration, and failure of 
another's consolation. As long as this divinity soared in 
her chilly atmosphere and kept one and all at a certain 
distance, no comments were made, but, since that atmos- 
phere has been found to be less cold when his lordship 
hovers near, their friends are kept busy wondering. 

# * * 

They say Mrs. Fred Sharon's appearance in bicycle cos- 
tume is simply overwhelming: "too stunning for anything." 



On <Jit, Willie Babcock 
Rafael. 



will bring back a bride to San 



Don't full to chew A.lams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gnm after 
meals. Indigestion fades hefore it. 



4&%^°*. 



The Medical Departments 




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awarded their last contract 
for sherry to Agents til 



Messrs. 



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Awarded Medal and Diploma Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1898. 



Sole Agents. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

31-J Sacramento street, S. F. 



Jul;. 






FRANCISCO NI.Ws LETTER 



K 



.(HimC^sir 



THERl n f.-It here about the 

\:I Idea ■ •( competition 
ami conflict being remove* - .1 very Bal sort of tri- 

umph, and I think the desire is strong to Bee the promised 
proposed by Col. Willand. I can quite fancy how ilitti- 
cult was lii* position as umpire, for with British en tin 
Ailing his soul it was galling to see the melancholy collapse 
of his countrymen. At the same time, feeling that all 
America ■■• y watching his arts, he was doubtless 

more than exacting and careful His generous offer of a 
purse for a subsequent contest shows genuine sportsman- 
like feeling. 1 was at Henley on the day, a few years ago, 
when Psotta, of the University of Pennsylvania, proposed 
to cover himself and his country with glory. Ashe loft 
sland his opponent's boat capsized, Psotta at once 
turnod back, rescued his rival, and starting once more, 
was beaten. Be might, like Cornell, have rowed over the 
course and taken home a cup. The incident occasioned 
great talk for and against Psotta — approving his kindness 
to his brother athlete and done mining his indifference to 
the number of his countrymen who had placed their money 
upon him. It remains an open question to this day which 
would have boon the proper course for him to pursue. 

New York society is very much interested in the action 
of the Reverend Bishop who goes to-day into the slums to 
assume the Rector's place at the Cathedral mission, while 
that divine takes a much-needed rest. Bishop Potter has 
long argued the importance, from the point of view of ex- 
perience, of a week passed amongst the poor classes, and 
he hopes to set the example to the clergy by undertaking 
mission work himself for four weeks, foregoing his usual 
trip to Europe or to his Newport cottage. To the many 
who fancy Bishop Potter a man devoted to wealth and 
standing, his course will be a genuine surprise, while those 
who know him and his dream of bringing rich and poor 
together in the projected Cathedral of St. John the Divine, 
will feel no astonishment. The mission is in a district given 
over to Russian and Polish Jews, aud has nothing pictur- 
esque to redeem its squallor. The Bishop will have several 
services a week besides a Sunday school, guilds, brother- 
hood, gymnasium, kindergarten, and dispensary, to look 
after, so there will be no dearth of hard work. Laymen 
are very much concerned about the rumors from Rome 
that the Holy Father has issued an order releasing the 
poor from ali fast day observances throughout the year 
excejjting Good Friday. The truth of this wise decree is 
vouched For by Father Ducey. His Grace, the Archbishop, 
has not yet proclaimed it, however. 

"Jack" Casserley arrived from California a few days 
ago, and is visiting Mrs. Agar in Westchester. Mrs. 
Ac-ar, you will remember, was Miss Macdonough. Johnny 
Doyle, Mr. Casserley's cousin, is visiting the Lakes at 
Yonkers. Mr. James Conroy O'Connor, who used to be 
well known in San Francisco, is visiting his cousins at the 
same place. Mrs. Sonntag has returned from Chicago and 
is once more established at the Girard, in Forty-fourth 
street. Mrs. Nichols is visiting her mother 
in La Crosse. Wisconsin. Hugo Toland has 
taken rooms in town, owing to the necessity 
for daily rehearsals of the new play, Horace, 
at the Garrick Theatre. Joe Grismer and 
his wife have left for Chicago, where they 
arc fulfilling an engagement. Mrs. Clara 
Shortridge-Foltz and her daughter sailed 
on the Paris yesterday. Among her distin- 
guished fellow passengers were the Edwin 
Goulds, Dr. and Mrs. Shrady, N. D. Rocke- 
feller, and Cbauncey Depew. Mr. New.ands 
is in town on one of his frequent visits. 
Lieutenants Oyster and Wissen, both for- 
merly in San Francisco and belonging to 
Captain Dillenbeck's battery, have gone 
into camp. The battery spent Sunday at 
Sing Sing, to the great joy of the inhabi- 
tants, who thronged the camp ground all 



tudio 
in tin i oiipiod by Mis,. 

told that this studio life is 
■at the musical ami dramatic 
students and pro rho make up the I arnegie Hall 

conl it ea immense 

Mr. and Mrs Gn - Mi Laughlin were given a dinner 
at Larchmont on Fridn by Mrs. and Miss Davidson. The 
McLaughlins have, .1 charming cottage therefor 

the summe \ Passe-Partoi r 

New York, July lOlli, 189 



Some of the BnesI art gootla we have seen tar many n day were 
being opened at Gamp's Art Store, on Qoary street, thta week. They 
are only a portion -I Ibe purchases Mr. Sol. Gamp made while m 
Ktirope, but were hurried through. When these are on exhibition 
next week it will be worth a trip down town to inspect them, for 
there are a number of surprise* for art lovers. 



SOMEWHERE TO DINE. 
There's man? a man, saint or sinner— 

win, knows doI tin. right place logo 
in scare! cb or a dinner, 

Nut too dear, but \ el Ben ad ct nam It Jam, 
Now here's the address — read and mark ii— 

Where the choice ot the best la at hand. 
Stalls 68 and Til. California Market— 

Moraghan's Oyster Stand. 

There's no need to look far for the reason 

Why the patronage pays in the pell. 
For they serve all the good things in season, 

And '/" boss runs <h> businsss himself. 
And the delicate, succulent oyster 

Is ever in greatest demand 
In that pleasant, convenient cloister 

Moraghan's Oyster Stand. 

" Californians " or "Easterns," they all are 

Put up in the daintiest style. 
And it's very well spent is a dollar 

In sampling-these bivalves a while; 
For the epicure ne'er finds an oyster 

In any lay-out in the land 
That tempts him to revel and royster 

Like Moraghan's Oyster Stand. 




fl. D. 1900 

Will have retired 
all of the "lift and 
peek 1 ' typewriting 
machines. 

The "Williams is the first 
standard typewriter to adopt 
visible writing. Writes in 
plain sight. Does not use 
ribbons. Quickest learned. 
Easiest operated. Does the 
finest work yet done by a 
machine Proof at the Pacific 
Coast Agency. 



409 Washington St., 

San Francisco 



Pacific States Type Foundry 

The News Letter's new dress was cast by Pacific States Type Foundry 

Furnished House for Sale. 

Magnificent marine view, fine garden, large yard; 45x120 
feet; well furnished; 8 rooms and bath; billiard table; 
modern improvements; convenient to two cable lines; 
For further particulars see owner at 

605 MERCHANT ST. 




mm 




Teaming Bflrax fit Deattt Valley £*t. 

A 2$ MULf HELP F0R KITCHEN -LAUNDRY. 

PACIFIC COAST BORAX CO. S. FRANCISCO- C«ICA«0-H W YORK 



H 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895. 




Gold Mining News of exciting character continues to 
in pour in from all over the State in regard 

California. to the revival of mining in old-time dis- 
tricts. It is coming California's way at 
last, and some lively times can be looked for in gold mining 
for months to come. So far San Francisco has not been 
benefitted much, and it is doubtful if it will, to any great 
extent. The people are content to starve, as a rule, 
awaiting a chance to pick up a twenty which cost them 
nothing, rather than invest a dollar which might help to 
build up the State in which they live. If other cities all 
over the Union were like our own, America would have 
been a back number in this year of our Lord. The proper 
caper here is to put a couple of thousand in a prospect, 
and then funk on the hundred which is apt to make the 
mine. A mine which could not be sold here for $10, al- 
though a most valuable property, is to-day quoted at $36 
per share in the East, where people were to be found to 
pay the California millionaire who owned it $100,000 for a 
chance to work it. This is the old Cook property at Mari- 
posa. The Pioneer Mine, sold for $150,000, is now quoted 
in the same city at $9 per share, with no stock offering. 
The activity in mining is due entirely to the indomitable 
pluck of the people in the interior of the State, who have 
fought their way inch by inch, in spite of the fossilized 
money bags at the Bay. Buyers from the outside are now 
inclined to deal with the owner direct, and all the small 
mountain towns are full of visitors who may, or may not, 
pass through this city. The English company near Red- 
ding is putting in a road which will help matters in that 
section, and claim that the mine has turned out a much big- 
ger thing than they ever thought it would. 

Comstock Considerable activity prevails in mining cir- 
Mining cles at Virginia City. Besides the work at 
Shares. different points along the Comstock the 
development of the Brunswick properties re- 
cently acquired is interesting mining men of high and low 
degree. It is rather early to expect results, but from the 
systematic manner in which explorations have begun at 
several points it will not take long to tap the lode at 
several very interesting points. Old Comstock miners as 
a rule are very sanquine over the future of this section of 
the county, and from what is said now, it is only a wonder 
that the proposition had not been pressed with vigor 
years ago. However, this is a good period to take up the 
work. We are about entering upon a new era of specula- 
tion, and money spent in this direction is apt to bring large 
returns upon the investment. The demand for stocks on 
Pine street has not been very brisk during the week, but 
prices were well sustained for all the principal north end 
shares. The Middle stocks are coming in for a large 
amount of attention just now, and both Chollar and 
Potosi should be a good buy, on the condition of the mine 
alone. The proposition to drain the American flat dis- 
trict grows more in favor the longer it is discussed. 
There is a wide field for enterprise in this direction and the 
movement should receive the support of all interested in 
the revival of mining speculation on Pine street. Utah has 
been assessed 5 cents, and Belcher 25 cents. 

Local Stock A large amount of new money went into 
Dividends, circulation 011 Monday last in the form of 
dividends on local securities. The Pacific 
and Sunset Telephone and Telegraph Companies paid $13,- 
200 and $7,500 respectively. . In lighting companies- the 
Edison paid $13,333, San Francisco Gas $35,000, and Oak- 
land Gas, $6,000. The banks were represented as follows: 
Sather Banking Company, $15,000, Wells, Fargo & Co., 
$20,000; Nevada Bank, $45,000; California Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company, $15,000; and the Bank of California, 
$90,000. The Fireman's Fund paid out $3 per share on 
the 17th, and the Hutchinson, 15 cents on the 20th. Busi- 
ness has been rather quiet during the week, with prices 
shady. Money is plentiful enough, but its investment is 
slow. 



A Voice There was a light ripple of interest excited 
Raised in insurance circles during the week by the 

For Peace, announcement that the long foretold had 
come at last, by the absorption of the Sun 
by the Fireman's Fund. This adds another to the list of 
profitable captures recently effected in the insurance field 
by this progressive and enterprising San Francisco com- 
pany. The companies now under its control include the 
California, Home Mutual, Oregon business of the State In- 
vestment, the Northwest of Portland, and marine business 
of the Anglo-Nevada and Union. While the retirement of 
the Sun is regretted on the street, it is a matter of con- 
gratulation that a home company has taken hold of its 
business. There is a movement on foot to bring about a 
peaceful solution to existing difficulties, although little 
benefit can arise from any combination for two and one- 
half years to come, owing to the way in which policies have 
been issued. One theory advanced is to establish a clear- 
ing house, through which all business must pass. The 
Oregon people seem determined to oppose the introduction 
of the non-intercourse law at all hazards, and a deputation 
will arrive very shortly with an ultimatum to that effect 
from the Portland agencies to the local managers. No less 
than nineteen small American companies have now dropped 
out, leaving the Fireman's Fund master of the situation. 
The companies that have withdrawn are the Sun, of San 
Francisco, American of New York, Fireman's Girard of 
Philadelphia, Merchants' of New Jersey, Niagara of New 
York, Agricultural of New York, Delaware of Philadel- 
phia, Fireman's of Maryland, Mutual of New York. North- 
western of Oregon. Teutonia of New Orleans. The Far- 
ragut, Traders' of Chicago, the United Firemen's of 
Williamsburg City, Franklin of Philadelphia, Glen Falls of 
New York, and the United States companies have ceased 
writing business, or, in other words, suspended in Cali- 
fornia. Their withdrawal takes millions of capital out of 
the insurance field in San Francisco. 

The Rawhide The bond on the Rawhide Mine of Tuo- 
Deai lumne expired during the week, and the 

Declared Off. London negotiations are at an end. The 
promoters were given every fair chance to 
comply with the terms of their bond, but failed to even 
raise the $50,000 necessary to procure an extension of 
time. Captain \V. A. Nevills and his partners, Martin 
and Ballard, have withdrawn the property entirely from 
the market, and will put up a much larger plant, one capa- 
ble of sinking to the depth of 2,500 feet. The property 
has developed wonderfully as depth is attained, and 011 the 
600 level the ore is as strong as ever and of higher grade, 
if anything. The App, an adjoiniug property belonging to 
Captain Nevills and his associates, is said to be turning 
out as rich as the Rawhide. The sale falling through will 
be a grievous disappointment to many persons here and 
elsewhere who were to participate in the commissions, 
which were on a very elaborate scale, as usual. Many 
offers are ready for the property, now that the Fielding 
crowd are out of the way, but all will be declined by the 
owners, who are breathing more freely now that they are 
out of the promoters' clutches again. Their experience 
was a pretty lively one in some ways while it lasted. 

A Heavy A tabulated statement of the savings 

Savings Deposit. banks of this city has been compiled 
by Secretary Dunsmoor, of the Bank 
Commission, showing their standing on June 17th. The 
total resources of the ten savings bauks now in operation 
was $113,657,468.85 on that date, the deposits alone show- 
ing an increase of over a million dollars. There is also a 
large increase in investments, while the loans on real 
estate have fallen off'. The banks included in the above 
category are the Columbus Savings and Loan Society, 
French Savings and Loan Society, German Savings and 
Loan Society, Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, Hum- 
boldt Savings and Loan Society, Mutual Savings Bank, 
San Francisco Savings Union, Savings and Loan Society, 
Security Savings Bank, and Union Trust Company. The 
assets of the same banks on Jan. 1st were $110,027,813.44, 

HENRY Schlund, a very capable young man, formerly 
connected with the Union Mine at Copperopolis, has 
been appointed Assayer at the Irou Mountain Mine. The 
manager, Mr. Gilbert McM. Ross, was also at one time at 
the Union Mine. 



July 20. 1895. 



FRANC \VS LETTER 



15 




" Hf«r "What th* d«vtl »rt Ibou" 

"OtwUut «1llpl»T IlKdrrr,. «lr. with | 



IT bavins been decided that the next annual convention 
nristinn Endear la to he held in San 

Francisco, it will become the press of this city to sit at the 
News Letter's feet and imbibe some piety. It is not neces- 
sai-.v that it should go very deep, but there ought for 
decency's sake to be an assumption of respect in treating 
red things, it is hard, of 1 ourse, to look grave while 
Dr. Pille and his brother Parkhursts are telling men of the 
world how to run polities, but the t liin^r will have to be 
done. These Endeavorers will judge us and carry their 
reports to the Eastern congregations, and it is intolerable 
to think of the impression they will convey as to our spirit- 
ual state if the Examiner, for dreadful example, continues 
to >;,%• such things as that the last thing a man of sense 
would naturally want to do with six twenties is to spend 
them for a pew in church. Let it be hoped that the Half 
Million Club will see the importance of co-operating with 
us in urging upon the press the necessity of concealing the 
impiety that now obviously honeycombs the newspaper 
offices of this city. Business is business. And then. 
brethren, there are graver, higher, nobler considerations. 

THE Rev. Joseph Cook, of Boston, got what he deserved 
in Honolulu on the Fourth, when Minister Willis stopped 
him in the middle of a red-hot Republican speech that was 
advertised as a patriotic oration. The reverend Joseph 
walked out of the hall with his hat on and his clerical chin 
in the air to prove alike his indifference and his good-breed- 
ing. But the lesson will do him good. On his voyage to 
Australia he will be less inclined than usual to perform the 
funccion of going out every night with his oil-can before 
retiring to see if an}' of the bearings of the universe need 
attending to. which Mr. Bill Nye says is Brother Cook's 
careful habit. Brother Cook is a very confident, loqua- 
cious, and impudent person, but in justice it ought to be 
admitted that twenty years of preaching in Boston with- 
out contradiction is partly responsible for his unpleasant 
traits. It is an error to suppose that because no one rises 
in church to dissent, the pews always think the pulpit is 
right. That is a professional error which is not confined 
to Boston. 

EVERY politician out of a job, and a good many who 
have jobs and want to succeed themselves, favor an 
anti-Japanese crusade. It is not likely that outside of 
California the people of this country will stand another 
"anti-coolie" movement, and it is pretty certain that 
Japan won't. Should we insult that high-spirited and well- 
armed empire and bring a war on our hands, the first duty 
of the American Government will be to draft for service in 
the ranks every demagogue and nine-tenths of the editors 
of this semi-barbarous and politician-cursed State. No 
pull should be allowed to secure a place in the sutlers' de- 
partment for Labor Commissioner Fitzgerald. 

THE murder of the two girls in the sacred edifice was a 
hard blow to the Emmanuel Baptist Church, but it 
could get over that if it could get over Pastor G-ibson. It 
is not Brother Gibson's fault, of course, that he has the 
intellect of a rabbit, but his flock has reason to be discon- 
tented with its Heavenly Father for imposing the double 
misfortune. Let the church find a nice easy place for 
Brother Gibson behind a ribbon counter, and get a man to 
do the preaching. That would fill the collection plate, re- 
move the stain in time, and sensibly diminish the resem- 
blance of the afflicted temple to a discouraged branch of 
the Home for the Feeble Minded. 

THE visitors at fashionable summer resorts in California 
can't reasonably complain of tedium this season, when 
the newspapers thoughtfully send their cleverest writers 
and best artists around to guy the life out of the recreat- 
ing aristocracy. If the aristocracy find this sort of jour- 
nalistic enterprise unpleasant, the remedy is simple. Let 
the bohemians into the swim. 

THE joy of the President over the birth of his youngest 
has been dashed. Mr. Hearst refuses to let him have 
a third term. 



Aef that the 
number O 

•- of the itinerant Bi 
and the vagrant harp | I by the omnipresent fruit 

r and the fraudulent prise-candy l>oy Whilst these 
- may In- in s,, ln ,. degree factors in the sum total of 
the influencing disposition to self destruction, the main 
reason wil. be found in the fearful despondency and depres 
sion engendered in the breasts of so many people ;ii the 
thought of their being obliged to go to' Oakland at all. 
There is no doubt that a sensitive brain often prefers ;, 
watery grave as the lesser of two evils, 

IK the hypocritical ministers who are abusing Mrs. Stan- 
ford for selling a million gallons of brandy to help out 

the University had been at the wedding feast at ('ana in 
Galilee, there is not a doubt but that they would have de 

nouneed the Lord for the miracle of turning water into 

wine. The Pharisees are apparently as plentiful in Chicago 

as in San Francisco, where this week a minister devoutly 
wished that the fare to the Park was a dollar instead of 
live rents. Yet they wonder that the laboring man pre- 
fers the fresh air of the Golden Gate to the stuffy odors of 
a clammy conventicle. 

« CENSORSHIP of the theatre has grave disadvantages, 
but it is to be wished for when a combination of dullard 
and scoundrel dramatizes the murder of Blanche Lamont 
and Minnie Williams. In the absence of a censorship vege- 
tables and eggs have claims. It is too much, of course, to 
expect that the newspapers will refuse to accept the ad- 
vertisements of the show. Indeed, but for the newspapers 
— which are the moral guardians of the community — the 
public would never have heard of this dramatic importa- 
tion from the shambles. 

WHAT an artless patriot our Professor Corbett is, to 
be sure. He was unpopular in London, a sympathetic 
republic is informed, because he wore the American and 
Irish colors in his belt over there. If that piece of informa- 
tion does not win him Sullivan's green place in the heart 
of New York it is a combination that ought at least to give 
truthful James an office, should he care for lesser honors 
than those of the ring. 



T 1 



Pound-keeper Osborn, who killed nearly five thousand 
unlicensed and tagless whelps during the past year. If he 
will turn his attention to the neighborhood of the Bay Dis- 
trict Race Track more frequently be will reap a rich har- 
vest of the most unredeemable lot of Snarleyows that ever 
scratched fleas. 

THE average criminal always enters a strenuous plea 
not to be sent to Folsom. He either has heart disease 
or some other trifling ailment, such as meningitis of the 
cerebellum or appendicitis, but the real rock on which he 
splits, or rather which he does not want to split, is the 
Folsom quarry. Making bags is much easier work. 

THE latest hymeneal infelicity announced is the engage- 
ment of Miss Vanderbilt to the young Duke of Marl- 
borough. If His Grace only inherits a tenth part of the 
family vices Mr. Vanderbilt may congratulate himself on 
an alliance with the most debauched house in England. 

IT'S all very well to rejoice over returning good times, 
increased employment for labor, and rising wages, but 
if this continues, what's to become of the workingmen — the 
working-men who work at talking of the "coming revo- 
lution?" 

ERSTWHILE the festive messengers 
Were wont to go on strikes, 
But time a wondrous change hath wrought— 
To-day they go on bikes. 

A MAN named Hanson, who was forced to buy pro 
visions for Bandit Brady at the mouth of a gun, has 
been put in prison for his efforts to secure his capture. 
Such is the irony of fate. 

JUDGE BTJDD, of Stockton, has sent three bunco- 
steerers to San Quentin for four or five years. The 
Budds are blossoming very satisfactorily all over the State. 

THE late Mrs. Duff left $40,000 to her daughter and 
nothing to the three sons, who are naturally fighting 
for their share of the plums — plum Duff, as it were. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895. 







3&M& 



THAT delightful Irish writer, Miss Rosa Mulholland, has 
given a keen and graphic picture of Galway " pride, 
poverty, and devotion,'' in her book, "The Story of Ban- 
shee Castle.'' The spendthrift father, the lost estates, the 
ruined family, the devotion of a governess, who supports 
the three charming Miss Tyrconnells, then the legacies 
which give them a home again, and the Lord Tyrowen who 
marries one of the girls, all go to make up life among the 
ruined gentry in Ireland such as it has been and as it is. 

The " Age of Consent " continues to interest the editor 
of the Arena. Some time ago, it appears, he caused "nine 
thousand legislators" in the country to be written to by 
voters residing in their different districts and municipali- 
ties, and asking the legislators' opinion on this question: 
" Should the age of consent be made eighteen or lower ? " 
The replies have been overwhelmingly in favor of the 
eighteen years, and, while some of the legislators were 
silent on the subject, there were only two iu the whole of 
the United States who responded with a defense of the low 
age. One of those was Representative A. C. Tompkins, of 
Kentucky; the other was Representative C. H. Robinson, 
of Iowa. 

" A Deal With the Devil,'' by Mr. Eden Phillpotts, is one 
of the most amusing books published for some time. An 
old man, one hundred years of age, sells himself to the 
devil on condition that he should live ten years longer and 
grow ten years younger for every year he lived over his 
one hundred years. So when he looked and acted as if he 
was ninety he was iu reality one hundred and one, and 
when he looked and acted as eighty he was, in reality, one 
hundred and two, and so on until he became young again 
and " makes pleasure's wand the magician of the day.' 

M. de Variguy, in his book. " The Women of the United 
States," speaking of the liberty American girls enjoy, 
says : "The results of the American system are the true 
criterion, and in judging it by the results we cannot affirm 
that the great liberty enjoyed by American girls at the 
present time has had any more deplorable results than has 
the European system." Madame Blave, in her book, "The 
Condition of Women in the United States,'' expresses a 
similar opinion. 

The " bicycle face " is, says the St. James Magazine, 
a noticeable result of too much bicycle riding. And it 
accounts for this " face " because of the necessity of keep- 
ing the bicycle upright, causing the bicycle rider a con- 
stant, though unconscious, effort on the brain and the ner- 
vous system. The center of equilibrium in the brain re- 
quires to be taught the business of doing its duty under 
novel circumstances, and it produces a novel result — " the 
bicycle face." 

The nineteen best known of our living American writers, 
according to Henry C. Vedder, in "American Writers of 
To-day," are: Stedman, Park-man, Howells, James, War- 
ner, Aldrich, Twain, Crawford, Mrs. Burnett, Miss Mur- 
free, Mrs. Phelps, Adeline Whitney, Harte, Hale, Eggles- 
ton, Cable, Stoddard, Stockton, and Joaquin Miller. Mr. 
Vedder gives extracts from those writers' works and he 
criticises their books. 

"General Sheridan," by General Henry D. Davies, is a 
rebuke to those English military critics who referred to 
General Sheridan as " a mere cavalry officer." The book 
in question makes a critical analysis of General Sheridan's 
career during the war. and it produces abundant testimony 
to prove that he was endowed with true military genius, 
and was so considered by Grant and Sherman. 

This month the Review of Reviews publishes the methods 
of the great banking syndicate which floated the recent 
government loans. Very little was known about this 
syndicate, and this article tells a great deal that is new. 
The writer of the article is Mr. Albert P. Stevens, editor 
of Bradstreets. 

Andrew Lang thinks that Grant Allen's "Woman Who 
Did " is not indecent. He objects to that term as applied 
to the book. 



H. Rider Haggard's book. "The Heart of the World," 
is another fantastic contribution to the literature on Cen- 
tral America. He finds a city, built of marble, with beauti- 
ful temples and many pyramids, near a lake which is sur- 
rounded by perpendicular cliffs, near where there is a 
plethora of sugar cane, cocoa, and other tropical and semi- 
tropical plants. The story is worthy of the author's reputa- 
tion in every way. 

The Third number of Art Idols has just been issued by 
the White City Art Company, 319 Dearborn street, 
Chicago. It contains six large plates, reproduced from 
the most notable paintings of the nude exhibited in the 
Paris Salon, and the work is done in the most exquisite 
style of the art. They are perfect gems, and the half 
tone engravings in this number are reproductions made in 
the most perfect manner. 

The very best gentlemen's underwear, shirts, collars, curl's and 
neckties are kept by John \V. Carmany, 25 Kearny street. His 
stock of gentlemen's furnishing goods is complete. He also keeps 
ladies shirts of the finest quality. 

•' El Monte " Hotel, Sausalito, is now open for the summer sea- 
son, at prices to suit the times. Hot and cold salt water baths are 
connected with the hotel. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething. 

Walter Baker k Co. Limited, 

The Largest Manufacturers of 

PURE, HICH CRADE 

Cocoas and Chocolates 

On this Continent, have received 

HIGHEST AWARDS 

from the great 

\ Industrial and Food 

,-} EXPOSITIONS 
, IN EUR OPE AND A MERICA. 

C onfinn ■ I" v '^ w of the 
V^aUllUU . ^^j. i m it „,!(,„„ 

of the labels nnd wrappers on our 
eoods, consumers shoulil make sure 
that our place ol manufacture, 
namely, Dorchester, AIa». 
"b printed on each package. 




SOLD BY GROCERS EVERYWHERE. 



WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. DORCHESTER, MASS. 



Office: Comer Grant ave. and 
Geary St., over " City of Paris. M 
Entrance U Grant avenue. 



Hours : 



9:30 a m to 12 M 
2 to 4, 7 to 8 pm 



A. G. DEARDORFF, M. D. 

Residence: Baldwin Hotel. Telephone 5400. San Francisco, Cal. 

HENRY N. CLEMENT, 

Attorr\ey-at- Law, 

Rooms 13 and 14, fourth floor, Mills Building. S. F. Telephone No. 855. 

Dr. F. C. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and o, Academy of Sciences Building, 819 Market street 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

CANDIES. 
CANDIES.— Don't leave the city without a bos of ROBERTS' Best. 

DENTISTS. 
R. Cutlar, 412'; Post street. 

DRUGGISTS. 
Evans's Poison Oak Specific. Positive cure. Sold by all druggists. 

RESTAURANTS. 
Franco-American Restaurant, 521 Montgomery street. F. Hltte. 



VOCAL CULTURE. 
Miss Caroline Shlndler. Soprano. Vocal Culture. Hours, 1 to 3, 2416 Clay 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 

Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated). 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 



Julv 



FRANCISCO XF.WS II III R 



A BOOK OF THE WEEK.' 



Wtore n> 
•ho tir-t u Inn after 

ng it we were tempted to > ,1 still 

ire are in the dark, for we ba led into the s\m 

We approached thi rith an open mind; for 

the time beinff we even put stian faith l>:i<-k into 

.iiid oothingness; we admitted the belief of Ai 
and Anaxagorae in evidei - in chirognomy 

and chiromancy, and yet we put the book down after read 
lug it a second time, and - I Proven." Nor did 

•me to tlii> conclusion on tl 30 often made, thai 

palmistry is " absurd and impossible,' nut we came to it 
on the evidence produced by its best living or dead cham- 
■ -among the rest this man of world-wide reputation, 
Cheiro — and that evidence we believe to be shallow, super- 
stitious, and unscientiOc. From the beginning to the end 
of Cheiro's book, we failed to find any arguments thai would 
stand the test applied to an exai 1 science, and yet it is as 
an exact science Cheiro would have us regard it. We are 
willing to admit that there is. as Cheiro claims, a close 
connection between the brain and the band, but do we not 
also know that there is a elose connection between certain 
areas in the brain and the big toe, and the leg. and the 
arm. Science teaches that certain areas of the brain 
structure control sight, hearing, taste, smell, speech; 
touch, and pain, while other areas govern the muscular 
mechanism of the body: and. so far as scientific research 
goes, there is no more reason why "footistry " should not 
reveal the future as well as "palmistry." nor why the 
" Mounts " on the sole of the foot should not indicate past, 
present, and future, just as well as the "Mount of Venus," 
the " Mount of Jupiter," or the " Mount of Mercury." 

That degenerate apostle of a demoralizing jestheticism 
who is now in an English prison, once said that there was 
"much soul in teeth." and we are not aware of any scien- 
tific reason to believe that he was not as near the truth as 
either Cheiro or Desbaralles, who would have us believe 
that there is "much soul in nails." Wasit not one of Law- 
rence Oliphant's heroines who said of her own peculiar 
power: "Xo one can foresee the future. All we can do, if 
we have a little more insight than our neighbors have yet 
attained, is to calculate probabilities with rather more 
accuracy." Nor can the believers in chirognomy or cbirom- 
anc}' escape the association of fortune telling; that is the 
close introspection and interpretation of a particular 
character and of external influences affecting it. Our 
decided opinion is that we create our own future, 
and . Cheiro's book only strengthens us in our belief. 
Change of life comes chiefly from the influence of indi- 
vidualities to which our temperament exposes us, or 
from that exercised by our own individuality upon the lives 
of others, and that it is all a question of temperament, 
character and free will. But Cheiro says that "man ap- 
pears responsible to the dual laws of destiny and free will. 
Man has free will, I argue, but with limitations, as there 
are limitations to all other things in life — to one's strength, 
to one's height, to one's age, and so forth. Free will is the 
oscillation of the cylinder which every oscillation drives the 
eternal machinery of evolution. * * * Man becomes 
the servant of destiny. The rulers of Rome, the Grecians 
of Athens, the Pharaohs of the Nile all have served their 
purpose and have gone." And it is thus that Cheiro goes 
on, and on, through pages of padding. But would it be 
irrelevent to ask what has all this to do with palmistry? 
What has the speculative passages about the Bible, George 
Washington, Nature, Rama, Moses, Egypt, as well as 
some mystic shadows of the past, to do with the necessity 
of proving that palmistry is an exact science? What we 
looked for was searching analyses for proof, burning proof, 
in support of Cheiro's theories, and in return we get 
Greece, and Rome, and Hindostan, and the Revolution! 
Even when he treats of "destiny" and "free will," he does 
not reason closely, and when he speaks of palmistry he be- 
comes mystical. We must, he says, be "determined" in 
character because our thumb is thick, or we must be "fin- 
ished" because our fingers are pointed. Thus the "must" 
of destiny determines what the "must" of free will shall 
do, and the one becomes subordinate to the other. But 
beyond all this the book proves nothing. It is a plea and, 



. d . 
and 1 • »try may 1 ■ . but 

this b< ., supposition In thai • 

We must havi thing more substantial than 

must 1 ontinuc t" look on his 

1. mi Tiddler nobody's child. 

Whatever the "book o fate may have in store for us, no 

that, m this inquiring age, man will 

accept the "inexorable destiny of Ufe through the medium 

of a "palm.' whether made by a clieiro or a Desbaralles, 

without having scientific data for knowing the reason why. 

If you want n perfect fitting shoe, mode In tin- latest style and onl 
of good material, go to P. F. McNolly, 188 Poat street, first floor of 

l.iebes building, and leave your orders. He always keeps the finest 
stock mi hand, employs none hut the very best workmen, and is 
prompt in tilling orders. His customers are among the most 
fashionable people in the city, and he gives perfect satisfaction in all 
cases. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 311 Sansome St. San Francisco, Cal. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE -13 and 46 Threadneedle St., London 

SIMPSON, MACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St.. Liverpool 

FUERST BROS. & CO 2 and 4 Stone St., New York 



Snell Seminary. 



The Fall Term will open 
August 5, 1805, at 

®^-The Merritt Place, 



Corner Fourteenth and Madison streets, Oakland, Cal , 
residence of the late Dr. Samuel Merritt. 



Pupils prepared for admission to any of the Universities. A 
fine corps of teachers for Advanced, Intermediate and Kinder- 
garten Departments. Send for catalogue. 



Mary E. Snell, Principal. 



1849 Jackson St 



Van Ness Young 
Ladies Seminary 



San Francisco 



Under the ownership and direction of S. H. WILLEY, aided toy a corps o 
twelve teachers. Numbers in the family limited to twenty-five. 

Next Term Opens August 1st. 



ScHool For Boys, 



The school opens for boarding 
and day scholars on 
AUGUST 1, 1895. 



1012 Grand Street, near San Jose Avenue, 
ALAMEDA, Cal. 



W. de JUNG, Principal. 



The Banjo. 

fishtail P. Stevens. 

STUDIO : 26 Montgomery street, 
Room 8. Pupils prepared for Stage, 
Concert, or Drawing Room. A Special 
Class for 
teachers who wish to perfect themselves in the Banjo's hc.mony and technic 



Miss Malison's Scnool, 



Boarding and Day School for Young 
Ladies and Children. 1625 San Jose 
avenue, between Grand and Paru Sts. 



Alameda. Cal. 



Mills College and Seminary.- 



, 1805. 



Mills College P. O. 



Next term begins August 7 

Write for Catalogue to 

MRS. C. T. MILLS, President . 

Alameda County, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895. 




Knickerbockers The feminine leg is, so to speak, up for 
and discussion. It has been brought prom- 

Leggings, inently into view by the bicycle craze, 

and one of the questions of the day is 
the extent to which the lower limbs of womankind may 
properly be exposed when astride the wheel. The adop- 
tion of knickerbockers in San Francisco by the women and 
girls who ride is so general that the question may be re- 
garded as settled, so far as these garments are concerned. 
There still remains the question as to the skirt. As to 
this there is a division of opinion, as sometimes of the 
skirt itself. But it is noticeable that the skirt shows a 
vanishing tendency. Observation and experience unite in 
the view that it is not only superfluous but also cumber- 
some. Indeed, the long skirt is positively dangerous to 
the wearer when riding. And the shortened garment flies 
up in such a manner, when the wind is blowing, that it is 
merely a plague, wholly useless either for comfort or 
partial concealment of whatever may be worn beneath. 
The consensus of opinion among the fair wheelwomen ap- 
pears to be that the skirt must go, so far as bicycle rid- 
ing is concerned. The query as to leggings is as yet un- 
answered. They seen to serve no useful purpose, and are 
merely a concession to the time-honored prejudice against 
the frank exposure of the stockinged limb. And in most 
cases they are unsightly, by reason of their tendency to 
bagginess at the ankles. In this way they destroy the 
symmetrical appearance of many a shapely leg. One now may 
note in the park a tendency to eschew leggings. The loco- 
motive apparatus of lovely woman may ultimately be en- 
tirely emancipated from these needless encumbrances, 
which are neither modest nor becoming. As at the bathing 
places by the sea, the stocking will alone be worn, and 
this is sufficient for cycling in the summer season. Until 
the rains of winter come there can be no occasion for leg- 
gings, and even in winter they may ordinarly be dispensed 
with, without risk to health or comfort. 

In speaking of pedaling the American Cyclist says: 
Choose a smooth surface and slightly rising grade. First 
imagine that your feet are operating pump-handles, and 
look at your chain. You will see going on that alternate 
tightening and slackening, indicating a combination spas- 
modic and needlessly severe effort with a dead loss of all 
effort whatever; next, change your mental image of pump- 
handles to one of cranks and that same chain will begin to 
pull regularly and evenly without the slightest implication 
of your consciousness as regards your ankle-joints or any 
particularly pairs of muscles or sets of muscles. 

The question of wearing bloomers was thoroughly dis- 
cussed at a ladies' cycling club in Tiffin, Ohio, recently. 
This was made necessary by two of the members appear- 
ing in bloomer costume one evening when a "run" was 
called' and the rest refusing to ride with them. After a 
spirited discussion, a vote was taken, which resulted in 7 
to (I in favor of skirts, but when any rider goes out alone 
she can wear what she pleases, but when she appears with 
the club she must wear the regulation skirt. 

Foil whatever the lower part of the costume may be, the 
wheelwoman almost always inclines to some form of the 
open blazer coat, worn over a cotton or linen waist. Then, 
on the sunny stretches, or when the wind blows warm from 
the south, she can dispense with the jacket and look trim 
and comfortable in her neat shirt, with a Windsor or four- 
in-hand tie — both as appropriate with a skirt as with 
knickers or bloomers. 

Ball bearings, as at present constructed, do not need 
oiling more than once a month if properly lubricated then. 
All oil used beyond that which is actually necessary is 
merely an additional inducement for dust to accumulate 
outside the bearings as it escapes. 

People who have never ridden a bicycle are naturally 
prejudiced against wheelmen and wheelwomen, but they 
may as well get over that feeling, because the bicycle habit 
has grown to be more than a fad. 



Helical TuDe Premiers 

Three Highest Awards, World's Fair, Chicago, 1893. 
Highest Grade, The Finest, 
Lightest and Strongest 

BiGucle in the World 

Racer, 16 lbs 
Ladies, 18 to 21 lbs 
Roadster, 18 to 21 lbs 

All Guaranteed for Boad Use 
l l/E take pleasure in inform 
xu ing our agents and the 
trade generally that we 
have perfected arrangements 
which will enable us to 
promptly fill all orders for the 

Helical Tube Premiers 

It is better to wait for a 
"Helical Premier " than to 
break your neck on the ordin- 
ary wheels of other manufac- 
ture. No other manufacturer 
can use the " Helical Tube." 

The only wheel backed by 
Impartial tests of the Ord- 
niiiif. Department, U * Gov- 
\> i-iuntnt . See the Govern- 
ment tests printed in our 
Catalogue. 




Depot, Salesroom, and Cyclery.. "^ 
East entrance to Panhandle of Park 



Send all orders to 



PREMIER CYCLERY, 312-3H Baker St., S F. 

Or to Collins & Co., 1018 Market st. ; C. F. Cormack, 1006 Valencia st. ; G. W. 
Glosser, 1718 Devisadero St.; R J. Harrison, 4&I McAllister St. 



Before You Buy Your 
1895 Wheel See the 



Strictly High Grade, 
All Late Improvements. 

Also^ 

"DEERE" 

Light Roadster 
Best Value 

"DEERE" 

Model "A." 
Lowest Price. 
We can suit You a 

Deere Implement Gompanu. 



"National." 




-Send tor Catalogue 



305 Market street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 







COR. 

MARKET ST. 
V.VAN KESSAVS. 



fiGENTSFOR 

"[LAaEALTAiRiiGYeiLis 

— ' (ALUMINUM RIMS.) 

ESSEX SPECIAL strictly high grade. 
WESTMINSTER medium. 

ReEWMIS A ^PiCPilT y, 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



July ro, 1895. 



FRANCISCO NEWS I 



19 



Cere Of The following ■', the 

The 
Bicycle. found useful ' \ Invito. m lr 

fact thai very 
.11 the matter "f < -;»?-■• 
of ■ 11 id. if ever, 1 loaning it properly, yet ev< r 

expecting that it will be ready for uae with every quality 
of smooth, easy riding, regardless of long toursover 
Daddy or Bandy roads pavements 

and lit v streets. Tires require especial care; particularly 
when tin- bicycle is put aside for the winter, or any ut;i- 
isation ol use, they should be carefully 

ed and your wheel suspended by the frame, or in- 
verted so as to rest on the handle bar or saddle. Time 
sooner or later deflates the tire, and the weight of the 

. even the lightest patterns of common construc- 
tion, will press the lire so it will double up on the sides in 
a manner that has a tendency to injure same. Bicycles, 
like carriages, harness, pianos, sewing machines, etc., etc., 
need care. Without it. they deteriorate, lose their beauti- 
ful finish, and. perhaps, rust — while a little care after each 
ride will prevent any of these possibilities and save many 
a dollar of needless expense. We venture to say that tin- 
bicycle manufacturers havesupplied, upon their guarantee, 
thousands upon thousands of dollars on the matter of tire 
alone, which if the facts could be proven, has been wholly 
unjust, by reason of indifference on the part of the rider, 
or perhaps, a lack of knowledge as to what constitutes 
the essential features of care. Don't leave your wheel in 
your yard all day or night, exposed to the scorching rays 
of the sun, the rain or dew; don't put it away in the winter 
in some old barn or shed where the snow and sleet will 
reach it. Put it in some clean, dry place, cover it up and 
protect it. Observe the suggestions relating to tires, as 
above mentioned, and your wheel will last you for years. 

"The Premier Cycle Parlor." 



The Pacific Coast agency of the Helical tube Premier is in future 
to be handled by the Western Premier Cycle Company, a corpora- 
tion recently organized with a large capital, which will conduct the 
bicycle business in alt its branches. They have just completed the 
finest cyclery on the coast, on Baker street, directly opposite the 
East entrance to the panhandle of the Park and will introduce many 
new features Elegant accommodations have been provided for ladies 
and gentlemen, who can have every comfort and convenience. 
Lockers will be furnished for patrons and their wheels carefully 
cared forand repaired, when necessary. A shower bath and dress- 
ing rooms have been provided, and competent teachers will attend to 
the instruction of new riders. The renting and care of wheels will be 
made a special feature of the establishment. 

This cyclery will doubtless attract the best class of trade of San 
Francisco, as the location is excellent ; there are no saloons or resorts 
in the neighborhood.the neighboring streets all are level and bitumen- 
ized, and its close proximity to the Park and the superior accommo- 
dations afforded should bring to it the cream of Ban Francisco's 
custom. The management is a guarantee of all this. Among those 
interested in the company are ex-postmaster Samuel "W. Backus, 
Edward P. Slosson. for seventeen years with Holbrook, Merrill & 
Stetson, ex-mayor L. B. Ellert, L. W. Sanborn, John N. Sherburne, 
with the S. P. Co., and many others equally prominent. The 
Premier Helical Tube is the most wonderful Machine in the world. 
No other Manufacturer can use the Helical tube. See the U. S. 
Government tests published in their catalogue. 




Implements 

in t*l 



I 







TECHNICAL 

Scientific iooks 



©sawrn 



QX/CC&iOt? TO 

AND 



MMARmtf, 



<S£mfon cm/uooue flotmttlmn 




THOS. E. KENT, 

597 Mission St. 

San Francisco, Cal. Cor. Second. 

LADIES and 
GENTLEMEN'S 



BIGUGI6 



TO ORDER ONLY. 




PvR. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 

^ Dentist. 

114 Geary St., San Francisco. 



The Munoer, 



Weight 20 Lbs. Price, $130. 



The Daintiest 
Ladies' Wheel 
On the Market. 



It is the highest product of the manufacturer's art. Light 
and handsome, and made of only the very finest of material. 
It is a hand-made machine. 



HOOKER & CO. 



CYCLE DEALERS, 
) 15-18 Drumm Street. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895. 







THE shortened skirts and heightened comfort of women 
cycling leads one to wonder whether it will be this 
year or next that the short common-sense dress will be- 
come also the fashionable dress for all occasions except 
full dress. It would be a scathing satire upon the efficacy 
of fashion if this reform should be brought about by the 
wheel, when physicians, clergymen, and sensible people in 
general have been preaching a crusade against long 
sue -ping skirts for so many years with so little effect. It 
would be a thousand pities if our women, having tasted 
the sweets of liberty in the movements of their feet, 
should not profit by their freedom and adopt the dres> 

lit jH'llim in llll . 

French women of fashion atv visibly at war with Eng- 
lish women of fashion. The French are absolutely antago- 
nistic to the English in the matter of color. The 
Parisians are severely opposing the Londoners in their 
adoption of high-toned and blazing hues. The Parisians 
are subdued in their taste, especially in their selection of 
colors for evening dresses. Grey, pearl, a gentle-toned 
blue and a soft primrose, quite give a subdued aspect to a 
Paris ball-room assemblage. The alteration has met with 
approval. 

ALPACA is becoming more and more popular for morn- 
ing wear, and is even being made up into smart afternoon 
gowns, with trimmings of satin ribbon and guipure lace. 
This material is admirably suited for summer wear, and 
it always looks clean and fresh. It can now be obtained 
in pretty shot effects, and also with small broehe patterns. 
The pale colors with small spots all over the ground are 
particularly pretty, and they look more dressy than the 
plain ones. 

Satin and silk skirts which are past doing-up can be 
cut down into petticoats, covered with flounces of black 
lace brightened with runners and bows of baby velvet 
ribbon. Satin petticoats are almost as much in demand as 
silk ones. They are of all colors, many of them being 
trimmed very daintily indeed. Some people think that 
satin is more durable than silk, but I hardly think so. 
Satin rubs; silk splits. 

White gloves are more and more in favor, with those of 
a slightly pinkish or tan shade. The parasols are high 
and voluminous, in that imitating the style of sleeve and 
skirt. The prevailing fashion for them is studded handles. 
The darker silks are in favor for general wear; the white 
moire and faille ones are reserved for dressy wear. 

Precious stones are greatly used on hats and bonnets 
with very good effect, the trouble being, however, that 
this new style of ornament in millinery is extremely ex- 
pensive, and it will, of course, be imitated in paste, be- 
coming vulgar, therefore, as well as vulgarized. 

At last the tide has turned and it is the hour of the 
brunette in Paris. You must be a brunette. A faded 
blonde or even a woman with mahogany-colored hair can- 
not appear to advantage in ferocious blue, purple, reds or 
pantomime greens. 

A new English embroidery of lawn, very open, and in 
some cases with a tinted edge, is much seen on nainsook 
garments that are intended for common use. 

Balloon sleeves in a single puff to the elbow are on 
many thin dresses to be worn with long white gloves. 

Although capes are foremost, jackets without sleeves 
will be worn by our great elegantes. 



The Survival of the Fittest. 
Furniture moved, stored, packed, and shipped at low rates by Morton 
Special Delivery. Only experienced men employed. Equipment flrst- 
class. Offices — 31 Geary street, and 408 Taylor street. 



The Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. F. reads all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies clippings on all topics, business 
and personal. 

Children cutting teeth, and suffering from the various disorders 
incident thereto, need Steednian's Soothing Powders. 



Great 
Sacrifice- 



Clearance 
Sale 



NOW IN PROGRESS. 



Everything at 

Forcing-out 

Prices. 



See daily papers for particulars. 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bat. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



New Whatcom, 



Washington, 



Is at the head of Bellingham Bay, ou Puget Sound. It is the North- 
west City of the State of Washington; population about 10,000. 
It is the third city in size and wealth in Western Washington. All 
its industries are thriving. 

IT HAS ADVANTAGES possessed by no other point in the State of 
Washington ; the country i? rich in coal, iron, and other minerals ; 
it is rich in agricultural and timber land; the city is lighted by 
electricity ; it has two electric street car liDes ; the water supply is 
from a large mountain lake 316 feet above the city front; the quan- 
tity of water is unlimited, and is used to drive machinery for 
manufacturing purposes. For domestic use it is unequaled. 

NEW WHATCOM is the home of the Bellingham Bay and British Colum- 
bia Railroad, and of the Bellingham Bay and Eastern Railroad; 
it is the American terminus of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and 
the Pacific Coast terminus of the Great Northern Railroad; the 
Northern Pacific Railroad is making preparations to enter the city; 
its harbor is one of the best in the world; the steamships of the 
Pacific Coast S. S. Company for the North all go there; steamers 
arrive at and depart daily from New Whatcom for all ports on 
Puget Sound, 

It is the Coming Great City. 

Gold. _ Silver. 

Chas. F. Blackburn, E. M., 



Practical Mining Geologist, 



Weaverville, 



Trinity County, Cal. 



Metal. 



Gold mines of auy description. Specialty— Free milliug 
quartz gold lodes and large bodies of hydraulic placer gold 
deposits Prices low and easy terms. Big profits sure, as 
I handle none but dividend-payers and am careful in the 
selection of good properties only Will examine and report 
on mines in this region or elsewhere More than 20 years 1 
mining and geological experience Terms low. 



Mineral. 



P R/ R BUILDING 



PAPER. 



Paraffine Paint Co., 



116 Battery St., S. F., Cal. 



July ;o, 1895. 



FRANCISCO NKWS I I Til k 




i?5UNBEAM5 



Htnied preoccupied. "Whj -<■ thnuchifiil ?" sbea»k«l, while 
with dignity t»>rnot worninlv mrrr* ami consideration of > 
drug-More col lie did not ct nir (on near him. " la ti 

be said, directing an intense c»ze tii>on her. " that you have already 
bad twelve busbati "— throwing ber shyness to the wind> 

she came and kis<ed bim— " yes. hut I'm not a hit superstitious."— 
Dftrolt Tribune. 

refused me! I'.l boped I bad won in the rare. 
It rankled me rather 
For there was another man in the case — 

And that »a- her father. 
Her father said yes when I asked him. You see 
I'd asked if be'd any objection to me.— .fudge. 
Hi — I tell you I'd like to have a wife who could discuss ques- 
tions of the day with me. Now, I suppose when you pet home your 
wife never talks over the money niest ion wilh you. does 6be? Poor- 
riR-r.- Doesn't talk over the money question? You just ought to 
h ear her when she wants a new hat.— Chicago Record. 

Cist-'Mkr in uptown drug store)— I want a thirty grain dose o' 
quinine, youngman. (,'i.ekk— Yes, sir. What will you take it wilh, 
sir'' 1 i.T'istii- I'll take it wilh a spoon. I'm a Wabash Valley 
man. an' I ain't doodish enough yet. thank God. to eat with a fork. 
— Puck. 

Small Boy— I don't wonder that women's heads so often aches. 
Little Gibl— Why? Small Bov— Every time they see auy of their 
children they've got to think up some reason for not letting them 
do what they want to.— Street * Smith's Good News. 

Chicagoax — More trains leave our city every day than any other 
place in the country! Blooki ynite— >'o wonder; even the trains 
have more sense than to stay in Chicago when there is any other 
place to go to.— Brooklyn Eagle. 

'• By sacrifices, tears, Bnd prayers. 

This church was built."' the preacher said. 
But when the printer set the speech, 

" By strawberries, teas, and fairs," it read. 

— Vogue. 

Pat— 1 tell you. Mike, astronomy is a great thing. Why, by it you 
can tell when there will be an eclipse to the very hour and minute. 
Mike— oh, faith, an' that's nolhin'. You can look in the almanac 
ar.' see that.— Truth. 

Mrs. Jones— It is strange that a strong man like you cannot get 
work. The Tramp— "Well, yer see. Mum, people wants references 
from me last employer, an' he's been dead twenty years.— Puck. 

Customer— So you sell these watches at $2.50 each? It must cost 
that to make them. Jeweler— It does. Customer — Then how do 
you make any money? Jeweler— Repairing them.— Standard. 

Mrs. Newlywed— Is it possible that your watch is in pawn again? 
I'm shocked. Mr. Newlywed— Ah, no, darling. I'm haying your 
photograph put in it. — St. Louis Globe-Democrat. 

Reporter— I suppose yon realized a large sum of money on your 
last fight, didn't you? Pugilist — Naw, I didn't realize nothing until 
I came to, a week after der scrap. — Truth. 

You can't be sure that a man is lazy simply because he gets an- 
other man to do his work for him. He may be only shrewd.— Somer- 
ville Journal. 

Horses have accustomed themselves to it and no longer take fright 
at the bicycle costume. But men continue to be skittish.— Wash- 
ington Star. 

She— Do you believe in football for ladies ? He— Yes, indeed I do. 
She — Then you're a new man, I suppose? He — No; I'm a surgeon.— 
Judy. 

HE(protestingly)— Poverty is no crime. She— Possibly not mor- 
ally, but it is matrimonially.— Detroit Free Press. 

Young Wipow— I've been thinking of poor Jack so much lately. 
" We've had such warm weather." — Life. 

" Grace before meat," said Noah, as he held the elephant back to 
make room for the antelope.— Yale Record. 

" Does Van Brief practice law all alone ? " " No ; he has a pal."— 
Puck. __ 

The Second Summer, 
many mothers believe, is the most precarious in a child's life; gen- 
erally it may be true, but you will find that mothers and physicians 
familiar wit h the value of the Gail Borden Eagle Brand Condensed 
Milk do not so regard it. 

Large Demand. Pioneer Brand Desiccated and Shredded Cccoanut is 
now wanted everywhere. The demand is larger than can be filled. 



Dr. H. W. Hunsaker has removed his offices to 114 Geary street, up 
stairs, near Grant avenue. 



lirilHovt CL 
SiSmacJC 

was Carlyle's expression of the 
expericn. e of many people who 
reach middle life before their 
digestive cry, ins loudly protest 
against improper food. The first 
warning generally conies from 
food cooked with lard. How 
often we hear the remark, "I like 
it, but dare not eat it." To any- 
one in this common condition 




the new vegetable shortening, is 
indeed a boon. By the use of 
this new and wonderful food- 
product the disagreeable effects 
of lard-cooked foodarealtogether 
avoided. The features of econ- 
omy, convenience and adapta- 
bility, emphasize the above, and 
demand the attention of careful 
housekeepers to Cottolene. 



Sold In 5 and 6 pound patta by all 
grocers Made only by 




The N. K. Falrbank 
Company, 

ST. LOUIS and 
Chicago, New lork, Bostom. 



California Enterprise # 



American Condensed 
Milk Company. 



Factor/, Marin County, Cal 



Main Office, 330 Pine street- 



Combine Economy with 
Satisfaction by Using 



Soutnileld Wellington Goal. 



A. F. JOHNS X GO., 

Financial Agents. 

Dealers in Bonds and Securities. MONEY LOANED. 

632 Market street, room 9. San Francisco, Cal. 



For the best value In 

HATS or CAPS 
Bo to 

G. Herrmann & Go. 

The Hatters, 

328 Kearny St., 
Near Pine. (Entire Building) 

The ONLY Retail Hatters 
having their own factory. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895. 



A STRUGGLE FOR EXISTENCE.-/*, r. news. 




The butterfly, the frog, the rooster, the cat, and the dog ready for the 
battle- 




The battle in progress. 




£%- 




After hostilities are concluded the butterfly flies oft, and, according to 
the rules of poetic justice, the others are nursing their wounds 



A HOME SCHOOL. 



THE days of Wackford Squeers and Dotheboys Hall are 
happily long things of the past and the word " school " 
once associated with the rattan, the birch rod, poor food 
and pitiless severity, is a new synonym for comfort, re- 
finement and education of the highest type. No better 
illustration of the modern school in all its excellence is to 
be found than in the establishment for boys presided over 
by Mr. W. de Jung near the bay shore of Alameda. 
The site is a most attractive one right in the heart of the 
residence portion of the town at 1012 Grand street, neat- 
San Jose avenue. The large grounds are only two blocks 
from the beach and contain tennis courts, a gymnasium, 
and all aids to physical culture. Mr. de Jung will receive 
both boarders and day scholars and is assisted by an ex- 
cellent corps of professors. The studies embrace the high- 
est possible course in Mathematics and include of course 
Latin, Greek, French, German, Spanish and the Sciences. 
To his work the principal brings an experience of ten 
years in some of the best English schools, and he was 
latterly engaged at St. Matthew's Hall, San Mateo. Whilst 
the highest standard of learning is aimed at the. individu- 
ality of each pupil is carefully studied and the entire course 
is a brilliant preparation for the universities. Mr. de 
Jung has the faculty of endearing himself to his pupils and 
he refers with pleasure to sue h men as Judges Belcher and 
Hebbard, Dr. Brewer, Dr. McLean and many of the first 
families in the State for an endorsement of his excellent 
methods. The new school for boys in Alameda may be 
hereafter reckoned as a most valuable adjunct to the edu- 
cational institutes of California. 

The QTand Cafion Line !— To the East ! 



BANKING. 



Commencing Nov. 4th the "Santa Fe Koate" Popular Overland 
Excursions to Chicago and Eastern Cities will leave every Wednesday. 
Manager in Charge. Through Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleep- 
ers are run to Chicago every day. This is the only Line by which the 
Grand Canon of the Colorado River can be reached. Send for illus- 
trated book giving full particulars. C. H. S peers, A. G. P. A., 650 
Market street. Chronicle Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

The largest and most complete stock of imported goods is kept by 
J. M. Litchfield, the military and merchant tailor, No. 12 Post 
street. He never fails to give entire satisfaction in fitting custo roers, 
and by promptness in filling orders, and experience in the business, he 
has secured the fashionable trade of San Francisco. Those desiring 
good material, honest work and prompt dealing will make no mis- 
take by leaving their orders with him. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 1862. 
Capital Paid Up, $3,000,000. Reserve Fund and Undivided Profits, $1,410,000 

Southeast Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 
HEAD OFFICE 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster. Kamloops, Nan- 
iamo, and Nelson, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Ta- 
coma, Washington. 

This Bank transac ts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of 
Sydney, Ld ; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and AVebb Streets. 

Deposits. June 30, 1894, $24,061,791 2ft 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,627.052 43. 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B POND, Vice-President 

Directors— Thomas Magee, G, W. Beaver, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ings. 6:30 to 8. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100.000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class companies, or grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-California Bank. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California St., S. F. 

Capital actually paid up in Cash, $1,000,000. Reserve Fund $ 685,000 

Deposits, June 29, 1895, $30,472,837 66. Guaranteed Capital. .$1,300,000 

OFFICERS— President, Edward Kruse; Vice-President, B. A. Becker; 
Second Vice-President, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Muller. 

Board of Directors— Edward Krusc, George H. Eggers, O. Shoemann, 
A. C. Heineken, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steinhart, 
Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Capital authorized $6,000,000 | Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

WELLS, FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $8,250,000 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S.King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier | F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 

Wm. Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babeock O. D. Baldwin A. K. P. Harmon 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones J. B. Randol. 

CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK of san francisco. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid-Up Capital J1,000,000. 

WM. H.CROCKER President 

W.E.BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond. 



July 20, 1895. 



IK VXCISCO N! :\\ S l.l IT1-.K. 



HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 



J ..!. the 

X moth, in pocking away your fur and n mit'iits, 

here are a few suggeatioi - .\ First, beat 

the iln.st fnuu the (garment ami let it haiiK i» <•»' Open air 
ami sunshine for a day. After tlii.-. Bhake very hard, fold 
neatly and sew up clooely in muslin or linen cloths, putting 
a small lump of gum-camphor in the center of each bun- 
Wrap newspapers about all. In addition t<> these 
precautions, secure a~ a packing oase a whiskey or 
ol barrel but lately emptied and still strongly scented 
by tin' liquor. Have a close head and lit it in neatly. 
Then sot away in the garret. Tansy is also a sun' pre- 
ventive of moths. Sprinkle the leaves freely about 
woolens and furs and the moths will never get into them: 
an old time remedy, but an efficacious one. 

Fashion dictates that every cozy corner should have at 
least twelve pillows. These van 1h> covered with all kinds 
of different materials, but must harmonize in color with 
each other and the corner draperies, the whole being a 
part of the color scheme of the apartment. Violent con- 
trasts should be avoided, but if the general tone will ad- 
mit there should be one or two pillows of oriental design, 
either of black satin with the pattern couched in gold 
thread, or of the new style, of cream-colored cashmere, 
embroidered with the admirable empire wreath. 

Good Housekeeping says that refrigerators should be 
thoroughly cleaned once a week, everything removed, 
shelves and racks washed in warm soda water, wiped dry, 
and sunned if possible, doors left open until all is dry in- 
side, hot soda water poured down the outlet pipe to take 
off any slime that may have gathered, the receiving pan 
washed out. Vinegar and water will take off stains. 
Never set any food in the refrigerator until entirely cold. 



To clean oilcloth and linoleum, use cold tea, which is 
better than soap for the purpose. Then polish with lin- 
seed oil and a little turpentine. Worn spots paint over, 
and the life of the covering may be greatly prolonged. 



For stains in matting, from grease, wet the spot with 
alcohol, then rub on white Castile soap. Let this dry in a 
cake, and then wash off with warm salt water. 

Charlotte Whitcomb, writing in Womankind, gives the 
following useful information: 

Milk should be used to cleanse oilcloth. 

Vaseline makes the best dressing for russet shoes. 

A pinch of salt put into starch will prevent its ' ' stick- 
ing." 

Soft newspaper is excellent to cleanse windows or any 
glassware. 

Spirits of turpentine is the thing with which to cleanse 
and brighten patent leather. 

A bit of raw onion will remove fly specks from gilding 
without injury to the gilding. 

Cold tea cleanses paint better than soap and water un- 
less the paint is white, when milk is better. 

A rough flat-iron may be made smooth by rubbing it 
when warm over a teaspoonful of table salt. 

The white spots on a varnished surface will disappear if 
a hot flat-iron is held over them for a second. 

Hard soap is better than grease to quiet creaking doors 
or to make unwilling bureau drawers submissive. 

Moderately strong salt and water taken by the tea- 
spoonful at intervals is a cure for catarrhal cold. 

A level teaspoonful of boracic acid dissolved in a pint of 
freshly boiled water and applied cool is the best wash for 
inflamed sore eyes or granulated lids. The same is an 
excellent gargle for inflamed sore throat. 

For many years, during which time it has been tested by the 
trade, the J. F. Cutter brand of Kentucky Bourbon is pronounced 
one of the purest and best brands of whiskey that has ever been pro- 
duced. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street are the Pacific Coaat 
agents for this whiskey, and also for the celebrated Argonaut brand 
of Kentucky Bourbon, which has become popular with the trade. 



BANKING. 
CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST CO. 

■ 

It til. J 
UalicM l*r.» 

VdmlD lain tor »d Tnutaa andtf 

. .. . 

lory f<ir oourl : iml tl 

f..r rcnldonu 
Or iilli.rs. 

Aots as Trustee of a n mil individuals, ami accept! 

tin- trim- 

■ Id tores I mi (J 1 
issues . Id teres t. R< 

■ 

. 
Infora r Hilly Riven. 

SAFE DEPOSIT HOXKS to rent ai price* from *:. per annum upward, 

stored at Ion rates. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital M.IMI.OUO 00 

Surplus nml Ondll umber I. MM).. 8.168,180 Til 

William ALVORD President I i'HARI.KS R BISHOP.. vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M.CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith... Ass r Cashier 1 1. F. MODLTOM -Jd Ass't Cashier 

t't>IJ RESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Lnldlau £ Co.; the Rank of New York.N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremoot National Hunk: LONDON— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. do Rothschild Fnns; VIRGINIA CITY (Nev.)— 
Agency of The Bank of California; CHIOAOO— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bunk; Australia and New Zealand— Bank of 
New Zealand; China, Japan, and India— Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available In all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Franltfort-on-Maiu, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. Paid-Up Capital, $300,000. 

officers 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President. | S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 
Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Mofflt, S. G. Murphy, Prank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Gram. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Well, Fargo, & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital Paid-up $2,450,000 

Reserve $375,000 

San Francisco Office — 124 California St. London Office— 73 Lombard St. 
Portland Branch— Chamber of Commerce Building. 
Tacoma Branch — 1156 Pacific Ave. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER I Ass't Manager. WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 
LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $3,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $800,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENBAUM 1 „„„„„„„ 
C. ALTSCHUL \ Managers. 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS, FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

Corner BUSH AND SANSOME ST. 

Steel safes rented from $5 a year upward. Trunks and packages stored 
at reasonable rates. Absolute security for valuables. Prompt and careful 
attention to customers. 

OFFICE HOURS: 8 A. M, to 6 P. M. 

CALIFORNIA TITLE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY. 

Paid-up Capital, $250,000. Cash Reserve Fund, $25,000. 
L. R. ELLERT. Manager. 
This company loans money on real estate and transacts a general trust 
business. It also makes and continues abstracts of title and issues guar- 
antee policies which protect the holder against loss. 
OFFICE— Mills Building. San Francisco. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President 

ERNST BRAND '. Secretary 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895. 



ivr 



MY JUNE GARDEN.-«Msr bell. 

[Y garden of roses has hung this June 

Aflame in the sunset sky, 
Where soft on the lovely cloud beds heaped 

The blush kissed petals lie. 
Like the hanging wonder of Babylon, 

Above the huddled town, 
The wind-swept banks are all aglint 

Where the sunlight niters down. 
On yon bright lake a white swan glides, 

And the vail of a fountain's spray 
Sweeps over the golden poppies that rock 

In the fields where my Fancies play. 
To sink in yon purpled violet bed 

A passionate wish is born 
To lie all wrapped in the fragrant mist 

Till kissed from my sleep by the morn. 
Oh, then, where will be my canopied couch, 

My roses, my flock of sunbeams? 
No longer will hang iu the radiant west 

My sunset garden of Dreams. 

The lingering loveliness faded away 

Like Babylon's blooming pride, 
When the Day sank down 'neath the mountain walls 

On his flaming shield and died. 

And the winds of the night host beat me back 

Whence my vision of beauty was seen, 
And the dragon-like shadows crept slowly up 

From the valley that lay between. 
Oh June, oh garden of Love, farewell ! 

Too soon did thy beauty expire. 
And my feet led me back to the streets and the strife 

With my passionate heart still afire. 
San Francisco, July 20, 1895. 



TOO LATE.— DORA PERRY IN CHICAGO ISRAELITE. 

What silences we keep year after year 
With those who are most near to us and dear! 
We live beside each other day by day, 
And speak of myriad things, but seldom say 
The full, sweet word that lies just in our reach, 
Beneath the commonplace of common speech. 

Then out of sight and out of reach they go— 
Those close, familiar friends who loved us so; 
And sitting in the shadow they have left, 
Alone with loneliness, and sore bereft, 
We think with vain regret of some fond word 
That once we might have said, and they have heard. 

For weak and poor the love that we expressed 
Now seems beside the sad, sweet unexpressed, 
And slight the deeds we did to those undone, 
And small the service spent, to treasure won, 
And undeserved the praise for word or deed, 
That should have overflowed the simple need. 

This is the cruel fault of life— to be 

Full visioned only when the ministry 

Of death has been fulfilled, and in the place 
Of some dear presence, is but empty space, 

What recollected services can then 

Give consolation to the " might have been ? " 



AT REST.— louise chandler houlton in the cehtury. 

Shall I lie down to sleep and see no more 
The splendid affluence of earth and sky ; 
The proud procession of the stars go by ; 

The white moon sway the earth and woo the shore ; 

The morning lark to the far heavens soar; 

■ The nightingale with the soft dusk draw nigh; 
The summer roses bud, and bloom, and die; 

While life and life's delight for me be o'er? 

Nay ! I shall be, in my low, silent home, 
Of all Earth's gracious ministries aware: 
Glad with the gladness or the risen day, 

Or gently sad with sadness of the gloam, 

Yet done with striving and foreclosed of care— 
"At rest— at rest! "—what better thing to say ? 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Fireman's Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,000,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager 439 California St., S. F. 
Fire Insurance. Fire Re-Insurance. 

SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, OF LONDON, bounded a. d. mo. 

Cash Assets, 810,270.535. Oldest purely fire insurance office in the world. 

THE LION FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD., OF LONDON. 

Established A. D. 1879. Cash Assets, $1,108,095. 

THE IMPERIAL INSURANCE CO., LTD., OF LONDON. 

Instituted 1803, Cash Assets. $9,362,920. 40 years ot business on Pacific 
Coast WM. J. LANDERS, Manager tor the Pacific Coast. 

205 Sansome St.. near Pine. 

PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT ASSETS. 

WESTERN ASSURANCE CO,, °r Toronto $1,642,001.80 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO., of New York 1,504,714.11 
BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE CO., °' Toront ° 1,164,196.26 

H. M. GRANT, Manager. C. A, STUART, Ass't Manager. 

Office— 123 California Street. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up $ 500,000 

Assets 3,747,551 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,654,489 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 401 Montgomery St. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St. 
AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. Established 1825. 

Capital, $2,250,000. Total Assets, $6,854,653 65 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT: 204 Sansome St.. S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, Established ira 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. incorporated ™. 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

413 California St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 
Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 316 California St., S. F. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG. GERMANY. 

V. CARUS DRIFFIELD, Manager for the Pacific Coast Branch. 

213 Sansome St., S. F. 

Assets $2,741,873 00 

Liabilities 923,000 00 

Surplus to Policy Holders $1,818,873 00 

Cash Assets in United States 624,329 00 

GEO. MARCUS (SCO., AgentS ° ityDePartme ^ California St., S^ F. 
REMOVED TO 824 MARKET STREET, PHELAN BUILDING. 



July ::«>. 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



»5 



UFE.-»c« ■ . w*. 

A plain, doit^tmrn and andaBnad . 

Above, a ran which fill* with glaring light 

The roid between, except when hldaotu night 
I.end< pregnant ghtom to some porlantOttl wind. 
Two parte<l soul-*, all-trembling, hear the grind 

(M phantom wheels, and >o, as Qod is Right, 

Make cry to linn that He may re-nnitc 
Their wandering paths and guide ihcir struggles blind. 
Perchance some day the rathlan bands of Kale 
l>raw each to each. They Bod, but when too late. 

That all their hopes earth's circumstance hafl rent 
And nullified. They look and nigh, then part 
With longing lips, sad soul and weary heart. 

To seek death's rest— lost love's equivalent. 
Bn naae!a»,J«t>aO, 1835. 



THE well-known ami popular scenic artist, Forrest Sea- 
bury, who luis left the impress of bis genius on many 
b canvas on the Pacific Coast, died suddenly of heart dis- 
ease while superintending the adjustment of scenery at 
Morosco's Opera House last Wednesday. He had just 
finished painting the drop curtain when the curtain of life 
dropped. Dp to the moment of his death he was appar- 
ently in excellent health and spirits. The play houses of 
Washington, Oregon. Nevada, and California all contain 
evidences of his professional genius as an artist, but his 
principal field of labor was San Francisco. Last May his 
wife was found dead in her room by Mr. Seabury, and the 
presence of a bottle of carbolic acid suggested suicide. 
She had clasped to her breast a photograph of her hus- 
band. He has done some clever work, and was highly 
esteemed by all who knew him. He was forty-four years 
of age. 

THE Whittaker Star Ham has always been considered 
the best in the market. It is the most delicious, ten- 
der, sweet, and juicy, and is cured by experts who have 
had years of experience in preparing hams to satisfy the 
most exacting appetite. No breakfast can be enjoyed 
without it. The leading produce and commission merchant, 
Thomas Loughran, 221-223 Clay street, is agent for the 
genuine sugar-cured Whittaker Ham, and is prepared to 
furnish the trade. It is kept by all first-class grocers, and 
used Dy all first-class hotels and eating houses. 

IT is said that New York girls have formed a society to 
abolish extravagant bathing suits. There has never 
been need of such an organization in California. Our girls 
have always been sufficiently frugal in this respect, at 
least as to the quantity of cloth. 

Those "who want a fine quality of liquor for medicinal purposes or 
for home use will find the Jesse Moore AA whisky superior to any 
other brand. Sold by all druggists and the principal saloons. 



For a wedding present, nothing better than one of our banquet 
lamps, onyx tables, or framed pictures. Sanborn, Vail & Co. 

ASK YOUR GROCER FOR 



U* pMCAKEMEAL *£ 

r, JUST THETHINC for c 

DampeRS 



FRANK B. PETERSON & CO., Agents, 
30-32 California St., S. F. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 19 

Amount per Share 10 cents 

Levied June 35, 1895 

Delinquent in Office July 30, 1895 

Day ot Sale of Delinquent Stock August 21, 1895 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, NevadaBlook, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 76 

Amount per Share 15 cents 

Levied July 2, 1895 

Delinquent in Office August 6, 1895 

Day ol Sale ot Delinquent Stock August 28, 1895 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary- 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 




1 Tostrn good m 

it (foe* down, doc* good 
gsr when it get* down. 

MIRES* . 

1 Rootbeer j 

fc makes the children rosy-checked, 
keeps the parents healthful, helps ( 
. the olil folks carry their years , 
» Ugbtly. A 25c. package makes 1 
fie* the whole family happy. 
tfjp*| GHA8. E. HIRES CO., 
^^{^ PHILADELPHIA. ^^\ 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Belcher Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal plat f business— Sun Francisco. Cal. Location of 

works— Guld Hill, Storey ■ 'ounty, Nevada. 

Notloe Is hereby Riven that at a meeting of tbe Board of Directors, held 
ou ibe 1 oth day of July, 1S95. ;in assessment (No. 51) of Twenty-five Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital BtoOK of the corporation, payable 
Immediately in United States gold coin in the Secretary, at the office of the 
cuiupany. rooms 3? and 38. third floor Mills Building, northeast corner of 
Montgomery and Bush streets, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid ou the 
90TH DAY OF AUGUST, 1895, 

will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold ou TUESDAY, the 10th day of Septem- 
ber, 1895, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

C. L. PERKINS, Secretary. 
Office— Rooms 37 and 38, third floor Mills Building, northeast corner Mont- 
gomery a nd Bu sh streets, San Francis co, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Ophir Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on Thursday, the Eleventh (11th) day of July, 1895, an assessment 
(No. 66) of Twenty-five Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock 
of the corporation, payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the 
Secretary, at the office of the company, room 50, Nevada block, 309 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
13th DAY OF AUGUST, 1895, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on MONDAY, the 2d day of September, 
1895, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Direotors. 

E.B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Osborn Hill Gold Mining and Milling Company, 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal.; location of 
works. Grass Valley, Cal. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Thirty-first day of May, 1895, an assessment, No. 5, of Twenty-five 
cents (35c.) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 20, 331 Pino street, San Francisco, Cal. 

An stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
8TH DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
will he delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on MONDAY, the Twenty-ninth day 
of July, 1895, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

6 R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 20, 331 Pine street. San Francisco. Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Potosi Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Virginia, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 10th day of July, 1895, an assessmeut. No. 44, of Twenty-flve cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Moutgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. , . „ , . , 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

14TH DAY OF AUGUST, 1895. 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction ind unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 4th day of 
September 1895 to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and'expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary, 
Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 




Max Abraham, 



Caterer. 



SALADS, Ices, etc., delivered 
at short notice. Weddings, 
Receptions, Breakfasts, Din- 
ners, Private Picnics, etc., at- 
tended to. 



426 Geary St. 



Telephone 2358 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895. 



SNY one who thought all society was absent from the 
city had but to glance around the auditoriums of the 
theatres last Monday night to see a goodly sized propor- 
tion of the Four Hundred. At the Baldwin and the Colum- 
bia theatre parties were very numerous, and well-known 
members of our best social circles were to be seen at all 
the theatres that night. July usually brings back a num- 
ber of the absentees who had been away since the early 
spring, school vacations having nearly ended; so a resume 
of luncheons, dinners, and card parties may reasonably be 
looked for from now on until the greater bulk of society is 
once more in residence in the city for the winter season. 

Donald deV. Graham's studio tea last Saturday was a 
charming affair. In addition to his own rooms those of his 
fellow artists, Amadee Joulliu and the Misses Froelich and 
Bessie Wall, were pressed into service and were well filled 
with guests. Vocal and instrumental music was a decided 
feature of the entertainment, and delicious refreshments put 
a finishing touch to the enjoyment of the party. Another 
pleasant gathering was the Strother farewell dinner at 
the Bohemian Club, that popular officer being the guest of 
honor in the party of stags; and Charles W. Stoddard has 
also been the motif for several gastronomic affairs. 

There is not anything of a very pronouncedly gay char- 
acter on the tapis as yet, but the future is full of promise. 
On Wednesday evening the young ladies of the Epiphany 
Society gave an entertainment in the Guild Hall of the 
Church of the Advent which was well attended. To-day 
there will be a matinee musicale given by professors Hoff- 
meyer and Bettman. Tuesday evening of next week will 
be Ladies' Night at the Olympic Club, for which occasion 
many extra pi-eparations are being made. 

Wednesday was the favorite wedding day this week, and 
pink and white were the dominating tints at the nuptials 
of Miss Eva May Krehonke and Lyman Foster, which were 
solemnized at the First Congregational Church in the after- 
noon. Flowers and foliage were used in prettily decora- 
ting the platform and organ loft for the ceremony, which 
was performed by the Reverend C. O. Brown, the bridal 
party entering the well-filled church soon after one o'clock. 
This consisted of Messrs. Tilden and Hersey, who officiated 
as ushers, the Misses Carrie Ulmer and Lena Schiller as 
bridesmaids, and the bride, escorted by her father. Her 
blonde beauty was much enhanced by her lovely bridal cos- 
tume, which was of white cashmere, the large Gainsbor- 
ough hat with its white plumes being extremely becoming; 
her hand bouquet was of red roses. The attendant maids 
were gowned alike in pink mousseline de soi over white 
satin; they wore large white hats trimmed with lace and 
pink ostrich feathers, and carried clusters of La France 
roses. The groom was supported by Charles W. Edge- 
comb as best man. A handsome djeuner was served at 
the home of the bride on Laguna street, and, later in the 
day, the happy pair left for Lake Tahoe, where they will 
spend their honeymoon. 

The colors chosen for the evening wedding were white 
and green, St. Joseph lilies and green tendrils profusely 
decorating the altar of St. Mary's Cathedral for the mar- 
riage of Miss Minnie Munroe and Dr. Andrew A. Maguire, 
the Reverend Father Harragan officiating. The bride's 
gown was of white satin m trains, trimmed with lace, a 
bridal veil and wreath of orange blossoms completing a styl- 
ish toilette. Her sister, Miss Madge Munroe, who was 
maid of honor, wore a gown of Nile green silk trimmed 
with white tulle, and carried a bouquet of white roses. Dr. 
Charles Maguire was his brother's best man. A dancing 
reception followed the church service at the Munroe resi- 
dence On Seventeenth street, and the honeymoon is being 
passed at Del Monte. 

We are having an epidemic of army and navy weddings. 
One is no sooner announced than another takes place, 
Lieutenant McCracken has arrived for his sweet bride, 
and pretty Belle McPherson will be another of the missing 
from the winter's gayeties. 



The principal event of the autumn season promises to be 
the wedding of Miss Alice McCutcheon and Ed Schmieden, 
which is named to take place in October. There are to be 
six bridesmaids, and the fair bride has selected Miss Alice 
Ames to officiate as her maid-of -honor. The costumes will, 
it is said, be very chic. Immediately after the ceremony 
the happy pair will depart on their honeymoon trip, which 
is to be a tour around the world, and they do not expect to 
reach San Francisco again until some time in the new 
year. 

Wednesday eveuing of next week, and the McPherson 
residence on Fillmore street, is the time and place when 
Miss Belle McPherson will become Mrs. McCracken, the 
gallant lieutenant having arrived from Annapolis to claim 
his bride, and alas! take her away from her friends in San 
Francisco, where she is such a favorite as well as a belle. 



From Oakland comes the announcement of Miss Grace 
Sinclair's engagement to Elmer Reed, with the wedding to 
take place in the near future. 

From Castle Crags comes news of gay doings — musicales, 
clover teas, riding parties, etc., as well as luncheons with- 
out number. There are an unusually large gathering of 
pretty girls at the Tavern this summer, and were not the 
distance so great no doubt the number of male visitors 
from San Francisco would be proportionately large, with 
such fair attractions in view; but as it is the girls do the 
best they can to amuse each other, and when a young man 
does come that way they make a veritable beau of him. 

The autumn gathering of the ultra-fashionables at the 
Hotel Del Monte began this week, and for the next six 
weeks or so will crowd that delightful place — the military 
encampment, the races, and the Country Club shoot being 
the three great items of attraction in a multitude of 
smaller ones. The regulars being in camp, the ladies of 
the Army have been among this weeks' arrivals at the 
hotel, where the majority of them will remain until camp 
is struck again. Among the exceptions will be Mrs. Mid- 
dleton, who, with Colonel Middleton, will join the army of 
Alaskan tourists before doing the Yellowstone regions en 
route East. Alaska has been a very popular point of in- 
terest this year, and the number of visitors from San Fran- 
cisco to that cold territoi-y will this month be larger than 
for several seasons past. 

Arrivals at Del Monte this week include the Taylors, the 
Popes, Dan Murphys, Mrs. Woolworth and Miss Helen, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. J.Crooks, General Forsythe; Mrs. and 
Miss Casserley, the Bruguieres, Mrs. Childs and her daugh- 
ters from Los Angeles, the Misses Hobart, Walter Ho- 
bart, Mrs. and Miss Chabot, the W. I. Kips and their two 
pretty daughters. 

August visitors will include the Tevis-Sharon party now 
at San Rafael. Captain and Mrs. Payson, the Holbrooks, 
Henry Janins, Mrs. Moses Hopkins and her party of guests. 
Judge McKenna, Miss Belle McKenna, Mrs. Peter Dona- 
hue, Mrs. Martin. This month's Alaskan pilgrims in- 
clude Mrs. Dick Carroll and her daughters, Mrs. Butler 
and Miss Emma, the McBeans, Charles Pages, and the 
Rosenstocks. Miss Edith McBean will be the guest of the 
Colliers at the Villa Kabel during the absence of the family 
in Alaska. 

Mrs. Alexander Center, of Vallejo street, who has been 
spending the past few months with old friends in Yoko- 
hama, returned to San Francisco by the last steamer from 
Japan. Mrs. Alfred Moore, who accompanied Mrs. Center 
to the Orient in the early springtime, came back with her 
also, anil has arrived in time to play the hostess at her 
pretty Belvedere cottage during the approaching flti 
there, "The Night iu Venice," which promises to far 
eclipse that of last year. Mrs. Dr. Greenleaf has returned 
to Berkeley after a visit East of several week's duration. 
The Misses Carolan have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Carolan at the Villa in Burlingamo. The Joe Eastlands, 
the McMullins. and the Lathams have been guests at the 
Hotel Vendome. Mr. and Mrs. George Page, of San Rafael, 
have been staying at Pescadero. 

The J. D. Spreckels party have returned from their visit 
to Coronado. 



July ao, 1R95. 



RAN FRANCISCO \ I W8 LETTER. 



*7 



Tbe dinner given to Charles Warren Stoddard ai toe 
Bohemian 1 t Sal attended b 

I Bohemians, many ol whom had not been in the club 
They were nearly all • >I<i Friends, irla<l to 

him back tn Bohemia. Amonj; those who >;it down 
to thr evening's repast were Joseph Austin, Colonel For 
sythe, who eame up from Fresno specially fur the event, 
s, John Stanton, Joseph Redding, who «;is m.i* 
tor of oeremooies and conducted the whole affair delight- 
fully, Amadee Joullin, Dr. s«;u>. George Bromley, who re 
cited an original and humorous poem, Dr. Arnold, Solly 

r, Joseph Strong, E Piexotto and bis brother, Alex. 
Hamilton. Dr. Chismore, who ;il>" recited a poem written 
by himself, Jimmie Hamilton, Dan O'ConneU, Edgar Mi/. 
ner, Lieutenant Bob Fletcher, Wm. Stafford, H. J. Stew- 
art, Horace Piatt, D. N. Delmas, whose speech put all in 
irorxl humor. Dr. Cushing, Hr. Younger, Dr. Lundborg, 
Or. C00L Eid. Hamilton, whose ever-ready tongue was 
electrifying. Qraham, Collin, and Rickard sang, Millen- 
bauer played the violin, von der Mehden played the cello; 
Al. Gerberding, Jerry Lynch, and Wm. Greer Harrison 
all made speeches. The dinner was pronounced one of the 
happiest given in the club in years. 

Lady Hesketh is now an English matron toall intents and 
purposes, notwithstanding the large interests she yet holds 
in this State. During her recent visit, many of her ac- 
quaintances and friends of former days called, only to have 
a card left in return tans the lady of rank, she being invisi- 
ble. The " only bridesmaid " was lunched once. Then her 
ladyship, overcome completely by the dust and wind, gath- 
ered her skirts and glided far away to a more congenial 
sphere. Truly is it said: "Our own Flo is a dream of the 
forgotten past." 

True and deep are the sympathies expressed for Mrs. 
Towne and Mrs. Worden in their sudden bereavement. 
While no largo entertainments have been given in their 
mansion since its completion, yet charming and many were 
their informal dinners and luncheons. This winter it was 
the intention of both Mrs. Towne and her daughter to give 
a fancy dress ball and entertain on a larger scale than for- 
merly, but a long postponement will be given to this de- 
lightful way of entertaining their friends. 

Camp Fair Oaks, in Niles Canyon, is one of the most 
charming spots to be found in the State. It is the more 
charming in the fact that the belle of the Camp, Miss 
Boardman, understands the art of entertaining and is. al- 
ways making arrangements to please her many friends. 
She is unexcelled in that capacity, and, as Dr. Charles 
Matthews, who has been one of the charmed ones, never 
tires in saying, it is a most delightful spot, and is presided 
over by one who never tires in her efforts to please. 

Jack Casserley is spending the month of July the other 
side of the continent, where he purposes remaining until 
late in the autumn. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kahn left for 
Paris on Thursday last, which enchanting city will be their 
future place of residence. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ellicott have gone to Baltimore, 
where they will visit their relatives during August and 
September. 

Mrs. F. D. Morrell and Miss I. M. Morrell are spending 
the summer at Hotel Jeffries, in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 



The Olympic Salt Water Company having overcome the difficul- 
ties that heretofore existed in the speedy supply of sea water for the 
swimming tanks at the Lurline Baths, they are now prepared to refill 
them with fresh water every hour and a half. The baths will be 
open every evening at 10:30, free to the public, to witness the 
process of emplying and refilling. The enterprise exhibited by this 
company in furnishing salt water bathing in the heart of the city 
is highly appreciated. The baths are located at the corner of Bush 
and Larkin streets. 



A Sunday afternoon at Haywards Park is just what the tired 
people delight in. It offers healthful recreation, and the amuse- 
ments are popular. A fine concert band furnishes the best of 
music for dancing, and the Club House dispenses excellent refresh- 
ments. The Oakland, San Leandro and Haywards Electric Rail- 
way takes visitors direct to the Park, and the scenery is most charm- 
ing. It has become popular as a summer resort. 



J lft QplOQial, 



Pine and Jones Stv 



• LI 

ipartmimta, tl 

m n Ithoul hiuli 

»Od with nil 

permm ntly, and 



SPECIAL RATES 



to ponnancrji Ruesia BUllMd Room, Elevator 

.us 

MRS. S. B. JOHNSON, 

Southeast <v>r Pine and Jonei 



Have your Mattresses Made Over, 
Furniture Re-Upholstered 
and Repaired by the 



Gliicaoo Carpet, Beating 

and Renovating Works, 



Sewing and altering a Specialty. 
Hair picking by machinery. 



GEORGE A. BARBER, 



1509 Market St., S. P. 
Telephones. 241. 



Opp. Van Ness Avenue. 
Please send postal 



Go to the 

"NEW LOUVRE, 1 



8-14 O'FARRELL ST. 



We have removed the "Louvre" from the old basement un- 
der the Phelao Building, and now occupy the finest quar- 
ters above ground in the city. 
RUDOLPH HAGEN. FELIX EISELE, Proprietors. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Hakalau Plantation Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Hakalau Plan- 
tation Company will be held at the office of the company, 327 Market 
street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

THURSDAY, the 1st DAY OF AUGUST, 1895, 
at the hour of 11 o'clock A. m., for the election of a Board of Directors to serve 
for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other business as may 
come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Monday, July 29, 
1895, at 3 o'clock P. m. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office— 327 Market street, San Francisco. Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Virginia & Gold Hill Water Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Virginia & Gold 

Hill Water Company will be held at the office of the company, room 35, 

Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal., on Thursday, the 

25th DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Trus- 
tees to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. W. W. STETSON, Secretary 

Office— Room 25, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 
San Francisco, July 9, 1895. _____ 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
■ Lady Washington Consolidated Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Lady Washington 
Consolidated Company will be held at the office of the company, room 33, 
Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, on Wednesday, the 

31ST DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
to serve for the ensuing year, and for the transaction of such other business 
as ma v come before tlio'meeting. Transfer books will close on Saturday, 
Julv27tb at 12 o'clock m. J. E. JACOBUS, Secretary. 

Office— Room33. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hutchinson Sugar Plantation Company, 
Dividend No. 21, of 15 cents per share, of the Hutchinson Sugar Planta- 
tion Company will be payable at the office of the company, 327 Market St., 
~n nriri iifter SATURDAY, July 20, 1895. Transfer books will close on Satur- 
day JulylS, Wat 12 o'clock M. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 
Office— 327 Market street. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1895- 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

(Pacific System.) 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



Leave. \ From July w, 1895. | Arrive 

*6:30 A Sao Leandro, Hay wards and Way 

Stations 9 :15 A 

7:00 A Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 10:50 P 

7:00 a Benicia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, and Redding, via Davis 7:15 p 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Napa. Cal- 

istoga, and Santa Rosa 6:15 P 

7:30 a San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 10:15 A 

8:30 A Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, MarysviUe, Red 
Bluff, and Oroville 4 :15 p 

•8:30 a Peters and Milton *7:15p 

9:00 a San Leandro Haywards and Way 

Stations 11:45 a 

9:00 a New Orleans Express, Raymond, 
(for Yosemite), Santa Barbara, 
Los Angeles, Deming, El Paso, 
New Orleans and East 10 :45 a 

9:00 a Martinez and Stockton 1<i:4.ta 

10:00 a San Leandro, Haywards, Niles... 1:45 p 

12:00m San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 2:45p 

1:00 p Niles, San Jose and Livermore... 8:45 a 

*1 :00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00p 

+ 1:30 p Port Costa and Way Stations.... +7:45 p 

3:00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 5:45 P 

4 :'i0 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 6:45 p 

4:00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo. 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano and 
Santa Rosa 9 : 15 A 

4:00 P Benicia, Esparto, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, MarysviUe, 
Oroville, and Sacramento 10:45 a 

5:00 p Niles, San Jose, Livermore and 

Stockton 7:15 P 

5:30 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 8:45 P 

5:30 P Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Raymond (for Yosemite), Bakers- 
field, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles 4 :45 p 

5:30 p Santa Pe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mojave and East I0:45A 

6:00 p European mail, Ogden and East. . 9:15 a 

6:00 p Haywards, Niles and San Jose. . . 7:45 a 
J7:00 p Vallejo +7:45p 

7:00 p Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
MarysviUe, Redding, Portland, 
Puget Sound and East 10:45 a 

7:00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 10:50 p 

9:00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

S tations ttl2 :00 a 

+tll:15pSan Leandro, Havwards and 

Way Stations *7 : 15 A 

San ta Cruk Division (Narrow Gauge). 
J7:45A Sunday excursion for Newark, San 
Jose, Los Gatos, Pelton, Santa 
Cruz J8:05 P 

8:15A Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, BoulderCreek, Santa Cruz 

and way stations 5:50 P 

•2:15 P Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
New Almaden, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 
way stations *11 :20 A 

4 :45 P Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos. — 9:50 a 
Coast D ivision ^Third and Townsend streets). 
*6:45A San Jose, s*New Almaden and way 

stations *1 :45 p 

J7:30a Sunday Excursion for San Jose. 
Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove, and 
principal way stations 18:35 P 

8:15 a San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove. Paso Robles, San 
Luis Obispo, Guadalupe and prin- 
cipal way stations 7:05 p 

19:47a Palo Alto and way stations. .... .. J1:45p 

10:4O a San Jose and way stations 5:00 p 

11 :45 a Palo Alto and way stations 3:30 P 

*2:30pSau Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey. 

Pacific Grove *10:40A 

*3:30pSan Jose and principal way sta- 
tions 9 :47 a 

*4:30p San Jose and Way Stations *8:06a 

5 :30 p San Jose and way s tations *8 :48 A 

6:30p San Jose and way stations 6:85 a 

*11:30p San Jose and way stations *7:45p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From San Francisco— Foot of Market street 
(Slip 8). 

*7:00. 8:00. 9:00. *10:00 and 11:00 A. m., *12:30 
(1:00, *2:00, 3:00. *4:00, 5:00 and *6:00p. m. 
From Oakland— Foot of Broadway. 

*6 :00, *7 :00. 8 :00, *9 :00, 10 :00 and *1 1 :00 a. m. 
112:00, *12:30, 2:00, *3:00, 4:00 and *5:00p. M. 

A for Morning. P for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

^Thursdays only. JSundays only, 

tt Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for 
and check baggage from hotels and residences. 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 



'NEATH THE SUNSHADE. 

EYES that are languid and dreamy, 
Lips that are temptingly red, 
Cheeks that are dimpled and creamy, 

And tresses silken of thread— 
(Mine the chief of disgraces, 
Loving the vision I view!) 
Ah, 'tis the fairest of faces 
Under this shade of ecru ! 

Blossoms that breathe of a bridal, 

Born of the redolent night, 
Wafted of winds to my idol, 

Just for her dainty delight. 
(What if 1 yield to temptation? 

Who could resist it? Could you?) 
Ah, what an artist's creation 

Under the shade of ecru ! 

Truly a model to measure, 

Fashioned by angels above, 
Truly a poem of pleasure, 

Aye, and a lyric of love! 
(Where is the harm that prevents, say? 

Now there is no one to view—) 
Hammocks are simply immense, eh? 

Under a shade of ecru ! 

— N. Y. Advertiser. 



Every real master of speaking or writing 
uses his personality as he would any other 
serviceable material; the very moment a 
speaker or writer begins to use it, not for 
his main purpose, but for vanity's sake, as 
all weak people are sure to do, hearers and 
readers feel the difference in a moment.— 
Holmes. 

Our natures are like oil; compound us 
with anything, yet still we strive to swim up- 
on the top.— Beaumont and Fletcher. 



Oakland, San Leandro & Haywards 
Electric Railway. 

Connects with the broad gauge local at Fruit- 
vale every half hour for San Leandro. San 
Lorenzo, and Haywards. 

Classic and popular music every Sunday from 11 
a. m. to 5 P. m. at Haywards Park. 

The Club-house cuisine excellent. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a. m., July 5, 9, 19, 24; August 
3,8, 18; September 2 17. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound ports, July 5, 9, II, 
19, 24, 29, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka, Areata, and Field's Landing 
(Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pomona," every Tues- 
day at 2 p. m. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
July 4, H, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, and every fourth day 
thereafter at 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles), and Newport, July 2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 88, 26, 
30. and every fourth day thereafter, at 11 a. m. 

Steamer " Pomona,' 1 Saturday to Monday ex- 
cursion to Santa Cruz and Monterey, leaves 
Broadway Wharf 1, Saturday, 4 p. m. 

ForEnsenada, San Jose del Cabo, Mazatlan, 
La Paz Altata, and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer 
"Willamette Valley. " 10 a.m., 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Coolgardie gold-fields, 
(Freeman tie) Australia, 
$220 flrst class, $110 steer- 
age. Lowest rates to Cape- 
town, S. Africa. 

O. S. S. Co.'s steamers 
sail: 




For HONOLULU, APIA, 
AUCKLAND, and SYD- 
NEY. S. S. ALAMEDA, 
July 25th, at 2 P. M. 
For HONOLULU, S. S. 
"AUSTRALIA," 
August 3d, at 10 A. M. 
SPECIAL PARTIES— Reduced special rates 
for parties August 3d and 27th (Cook's Parly 
August 3d ) 
For passage apply to 138 Montgomery street. 
For freight apply to 327 Market street, 
J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., General Agts. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

Tiburon Ferry— Foot of Market Street. 
SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:40, 9:20. 11:00 A m; 12:35,3:30 
5:10. 6:30 p m. Thursdays— Extra trip at 
11:30 p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 
and II :30 P M. 

SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:30, 11:00 A M; 1:30. 3:30, 5:00, 
0:20 pm. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:25, 7:55, 9:30, 11:10 am; 12:45, 
3 :40, 5 : 10 p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :55 
and 6:35 p m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 am; 1:40,3:40,5:00, 
6:25 p m. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 
same schedule as above. 



Leave S. f. 


In Effect 
Nov. 1, 18114. 

DESTI'TION. 


Arrive in S. F. 


^Sundays. 


Sundays. 


Week 
Days. 


7:40am 
3:80 pm 
5:10 pm 


8:00 AM 
9:30 am 
5:00 pm 


Novato, 
Petatuma, 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 am 
6:05 pm 

7 :3n p M 


8:50AM 
10:30am 
6:15pm 






Fulton, 

Wlnasor, 

Heaiasburg, 

Geyserville, 






















8:00am 


7 :30 p M 












7:40 ami ,. m I Pleta.Hop- 1 ,.«,„„ 
3:30pm| »•<"*" liana, Ukiata.l 7..WPM 


10:30 am 
6:15pm 


3-30p™| 8:0 °am 1 Guerneville| 7:30pm 


10:40am 
6:05 pm 


7:40am| 8:00am 1 Sonoma, 110:40am 
5:10pm| 5:00pm | Glen Ellen. I 6:05PM 


8:50am 
6:15pm 


7:40AM| 8:00am 1 o.,,..,™., 110:40AM 
3:30 pm| 5:00 pm | Sevastopol. | „.„- pM 


10 30AM 
6:15 PM 



Stages connect at San Rafael for Bolinas. 

Stages connect at Geyserville for Skaggs 
Springs. 

Stages connect at Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Stages connect at Pieta for Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville, Soda Bay, and Lakeport. 

Stages connect at Hop land for Lakeport and 
Bartlett Springs. 

Stages connect at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Upper Lake, 
Boone vi lie, Greenwood, Orr's Hot Springs, Men- 
docino City, Fort Bragg, Usal. Westport, Lay- 
tonville, Willitts, Capella, Pomo, Potter Valley, 
John Day's, Lierley's, Gravelly Valley, Harris;, 
Blocksburg, Bridgeville, Hydesville, and Eureka 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round TripTickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle 
Building. 

H. C. WHITING, R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Passenger Agent. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. 

SAILINGS— At Noon. 

From Company's wharf. First and BrannanSts. 

S. S. "San Bias," July 29, 1895. 
S. S. "San Juan," August 8, 1895. 
S. S. "Colon." August 19, 1895. 
S. S. "San Jose." August 28, 1805 
Japan and China Line for Yokohama and 
Hongkong. 
Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 
Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 
India, etc. 
SAILINGS at 3 p. m. 
S. S. 'City of Peking," via Honolulu, August 3. 
S. S. "China," August 13, 1895. 
S. S. "Peru," September 3, 1895. 
S. S. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Sept 21 , 1895. 
Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the Company's 
office, No. 425 Market street. 

ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

For Japan and China. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 P M, for YOKOHAMA and 
HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
steamers for SHANGHAI. 

Gaelic Tuesday, July 23, 1895 

Beixjic Saturday, August 24, 1895 

(.'optic (via Honolulu).. Thursday, Sept. 12, 1895 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 
For freight or passage apply at Company's 
office, No. 425 Market street, corner First. 

D. D. STUBBS, Secretary. 



10 Ont: 



Annual U'nn, $\.0O. 





9 $M r ^5 c »»e» 

fP|ETTBR 




KoJ. I/. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 27. I 



Number 4. 



Prinixiniut PuMUunt tntrf Sntmrdaf \v ".- proprietor, FRKli MARRIOTT, 
mM-4*T&-*i.\ Mrrfftant *tr**t . Ban *Ya «f 'i' San f- ■ 

Poitojk' 04 Steond-elan* i/all'r. 

Tke oftf nf Iht SEWS l.F.TTFl; <■■ M for* city it at Iht , 

f.'onrn J. irfifrf information may 
6* obtainttt rrganting nuhtnHptin,, ,,,„t adnmrtUUuj rat**. 

NOW that Mayor Sutro has borrowed a quarter of a 
million dollars from the Hibemia Bank, be may be 
netting ready to subscribe to the Valley road. 

THE Superintendent of Streets is quite right in his de- 
claration that cobblestone pavements should no longer 
be allowed to disgrace our city. The cobbles must go, to 
join the Silurian. 

NEWSPAPER readers have grown weary of the do- 
mestic infelicities of the Corbet t family. There should 
be subjects more edifying, as well as more entertaining, 
than the amours of a prize-fighter. 

OBJECTION to the program of the Half Million Club 
cannot be made on the ground that it is not sufficient- 
ly comprehensive. The only anxiety is lest the club may 
have bitten off more than its molars can well masticate. 

THE newspapers of this city make so great a flourish 
over the word of construction on the San Joaquin 
Valley Railroad, that a stranger might suppose railway 
building to be a novel undertaking in California. When 
half a page of one of our metropolitan journals is devoted 
to a picture of a dump cart and a heap of dirt, it is time 
to call a halt. 

IT is well for the public to understand that the Populists 
look to rag-money as the ultimate desideratum, with 
free silver as a stepping stone to the accomplishment of 
that result. If the nation may become free from every 
ill by putting the printing presses into operation for the 
manufacture of fiat money, having "no commodity value," 
the sooner the operation is begun the better. 

AN Oakland woman, it is said, is about to offer for pro- 
bate a " spirit " will of the late Dr. Poulson. Curious 
to relate, this spirit will has taken documentary form. It 
leaves nothing to the widow of the decedent, and gives 
everything to the spirit lady who has produced it from the 
spirit world. Should this remarkable testament be filed, 
it is quite likely that the judge will refer it to a spiritual 
court. 

EX-CONGRESSMAN HORR, who opposed Harvey in 
the silver debate, professed to be highly indignant 
over the latter's reflections upon the Congress of 1873. 
Persons familiar with Horr's record and reputation in 
Washington must have smiled at this. When he was in 
Congress it was always safe to predict that his vote would 
be in favor of any measure that "had money in it." His 
ability is unquestioned, but his patriotism can best escape 
criticism by remaining in the background. 

THE growers of deciduous fruits in California are ex- 
periencing the benefits of a thorough organization for 
the regulation of shipments and of auction sales in Eastern 
cities. It is said that more than four-fifths of the fruit 
shipped this season has been sent forward under the aus- 
pices of this association. The fruit-shipping industry has 
become so large that the old happy-go-lucky methods are 
no longer practicable. And the growers have learned the 
lesson, too, that they must not allow one another's fruit to 
be used by unscrupulous commission men in a way to break 
markets and destroy prices. 



Tamp e of the < Iregonian, who blew himself up 
with a keg of giant powder, ia scarcely to be com 
mended. But, with the exception o! the Coroner, who 
couldn't find the remains, we may all admire the thoro 

ness of the decedent. 

SNOREE, the daring Swede who will try to reach the 
North Pole in a balloon. is confident that the winds 

will not only blow him there but also blow him back again. 
Whatever may be thought of his bold undertaking, no one 
can say that he lacks courage. There's a host of other 
fellows one would sooner see start upon this serial expedi- 
tion. 



IN waging a tremendous war on the Southern Pacific's 
spur tracks in the park, the Call has made a curious 
exhibition of misplaced zeal. Since the Merchant's Asso- 
ciation has shown that the tracks were retained by the 
request of that organization, and against the wish of the 
corporation, the " great newspaper " has been completely 
" caved down." 

THE success of Labor Commissioner Fitzgerald's free 
employment bureau has led to an excellent suggestion 
for the' benefit of the hundreds of unemployed. It has been 
proposed that each county provide a farm on which men 
willing to work could at all times find employment. It 
would be an easy matter to thus enable every able-bodied 
man to earn a subsistence. And such relief is infinitely 
preferable to alms-giving, which is always demoralizing. 

IT is a significant fact that one of the reasons why the 
Ostrander gun company thinks of transferring its fac- 
tory from Boston to this State is because of the dryness of 
the atmosphere in the inland towns — such as at Stockton 
— and the security this gives for seasoning the wood by 
natural heat in preference to the artificial heat used in 
other places. And this is equally true of the manufacture 
of wheels, window frames, doors, and wood work generally. 
San Francisco, on the other hand, will invite woolen, and 
factories requiring moisture, within its limits, and thus 
each can be provided with what is best. 

SINCE last summer an automatic sunshine recorder 
has been industriously at work on the roof of the 
Mills building, over the rooms occupied by the Weather 
Bureau. This instrument is exceedingly sensitive, and 
whenever the sunshine is strong enough to cast a shadow 
the register responds. The record shows that even in the 
winter season, when San Francisco has less fair weather 
than at any other period of the year, the average amount 
of sunshine here is greater than the average for the whole 
year in the East. The Half Million Club should take pains 
to display our sunshine record before the eyes of the 
Eastern people. 

CORONADO, Santa Barbara, and other favorite resorts 
in Southern California, at one time took pains to ad- 
vertise themselves by causing daily • telegraphic bulletins 
of temperature to be published in Eastern cities. This was 
done in the winter season, when the contrast between the 
bitter cold of the East and the mild temperature of the 
Southern California Coast was most striking. In a similar 
way, it would be well worth while to advertise in the East 
the superior comfort of the summer climate of San Fran- 
cisco. The perspiring and heat-stricken millions on the 
Atlantic slope would be astonished, during the summer 
months, to read daily reports of the maximum temperature 
in this city. 



-SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 



SLAVES OF THEIR LOGIC. 

WHEN the clergy offend against common sense there is 
a too-prevalent disposition to be uncharitable, intol- 
erant, and to decide that the brethren are fools. It is for- 
gotten that a preacher, like a politician, usually feels 
bound in duty and honor to square his opinions with his 
platform, rather than to insist that his platform shall 
square with good sense. Hence it often happens that a 
clergyman will take a position, as a clergyman, which, as 
a man, he knows is silly. It is not thinkable, for example, 
that all the preachers of Chicago who condemned the pro- 
duction and sale of Vina brandy by Mrs. Stanford in the 
interest of the University's revenue, were in earnest. Most 
of them, doubtless, were constrained by the conventional 
views held by their denominations on the liquor question to 
utter the nonsense that came from their reverend lips. 
We have another illustration of this tyranny of the plat- 
form in Berkeley, where some clergymen and other 
unnaturally good people have been thrown into a state 
of mind by the fact that some tobacco plants arc being 
grown in the State University's experimental gardens. 
"Smoking," says the Rev. H. A. Ketchum, of the First 
Presbyterian Church, ''is a curse to manhood. The in- 
fluence of that tobacco plantation upon the students is 
undoubtedly very strong, and it should be removed." Dr. 
Bentley, of the Methodist Church, says : "I decidedly ob- 
ject to the University raising tobacco. I suppose they 
will next try to perfect the culture of opium." The Women's 
Christian Temperance Union, which generally follows the 
lead of the least intelligent and most narrow pulpit guides, 
is of course aroused. 

Dr. Ketchum and Brother Bentley, and their whole 
tribe, are simply slaves of their logic, which has its weak- 
ness in its premises. Alcohol and tobacco when abused in 
their use, do great harm ; therefore, let us abolish alcohol 
and tobacco. That is how they reason, and they follow 
their logic to grotesque conclusions. A preacher was sent 
the other day from Los Angeles to the penitentiary for 
perjury, and a deacon from Ukiah for stage robbery. Let 
us apply the logic : Since a preacher and a deacon have so 
sinned, and perjury and stage robbery arc appalling crimes, 
it follows that we should abolish preachers and deacons. 
Or: A preacher in North Carolina three weeks ago shot a 
parishioner who objected to the good man's attentions to 
his, the parishioner's, wife ; therefore, let us forbid the 
manufacture and sale of firearms and gunpowder, but for 
which this brother would not have brought affliction upon 
himself and scandal to the household of faith. Or, better 
still, if this parishioner had had no wife the preacher would 
not have, been tempted ; therefore, let us pray the Lord to 
abolish the female sex, that his sons may hereafter walk 
in purity, and calmness, and comfort. 

The fidelity of the brethren to their logic may be admir- 
able as a proof of consistency, but it leads them into a 
condition of mental confusion which excites the scornful 
mirth of those whose wits have not been bedeviled by re- 
generation. There shall be no more brandy for the sick, 
none for the well who take it for their legitimate pleasure, 
because drunkards are made by brandy ; there shall be no 
after-dinner cigars, no pipe for the soothing of the tired 
worker, because tobacco does harm to certain weaklings 
who can use nothing in moderation ; opium shall be elimi- 
nated from the pharmacopoeia, pain shall not be mastered 
by the doctor, because opium ministers to a degrading 
vice. The error of the brethren is not in attacking the 
abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and opium, but in their manner 
of attack. If the world is not to be made virtuous until 
all temptation to sin be removed from men and women, the 
era of universal righteousness will hardly arrive during the 
lifetime of Drs. Ketchum and Bentley, and the enlightened 
Chicago critics of Mrs. Stanford. The oak is not close- 
fibered and strong because it is protected from the winds, 
but because it has struggled with them and stood against 
them. It would be as practicable to ask that men should 
wear muzzles when out of their pastors' sight as that they 
should be withheld from injurious indulgence in good things 
by the extirpation of the good things. The principle of 
prohibition, which is at the bottom of all these painful ex- 
hibitions of the brethren's want of thinking power, will not 
do for this real world, inhabited as it is by real men and 
women. In its last analysis it is blasphemous. If the 



Almighty did not intend that we should have brandy and 
tobacco for our solace, and opium for our pain, he would 
not have created the leaf, the grape, and the poppy, nor 
permitted his creatures to discover and utilize their prop- 
erties. The brethren, as pious men, should reflect on this, 
and as men of sense they should candidly face the question 
whether it is not better to raise human beings able to re- 
sist temptation than vainly to try to turn the earth into 
one vast reformatory, the inmates of which should be sober 
and chaste because it would be physically impossible for 
them to obtain the means of sinning. 

It is satisfactory to learn that the tobacco plants at the 
State University are doing well. California has, in places, 
the climate and soil suited to make it a tobacco-producing 
State. It is to be hoped that we can also enter upon the 
opium industry. Our brandy has long been ranked with 
the best in the world. The most inferior of our products 
seem to be preachers, who, as a whole, are apparently not 
above the low intellectual Chicago standard. 

The Real Debs is keeping surprisingly quiet in jail. Itwill 
Social be remembered that his incarceration was to be 

Problem, the signal for the outbreak of the revolution. 
Then, when he was put behind the bars, the 
announcement came that the spectacle of labor's leader in 
prison would embitter the souls of the toiling masses and 
preach to them more eloquently than words the necessity 
for going to the polls en mnsxr and voting for such a change 
in industrial conditions as shall reverse the social pyramid 
and put the workingman on top. Just before the doors 
closed on him, Debs himself said that he meant to appeal 
to the wage-workers of the country to unite in the great 
cause of procuring government ownership of the railroads, 
and all other public utilities. There is nothing the mat- 
ter with that programme, or with any other lawful 
proposition which looks to the ballot-box for settlement. 
But there is a good deal the matter with Debs and all the 
other " friends of labor," who appeal to the class feeling 
of the workingmen. They are neither wise men nor good 
politicians, for they proceed upon the theory that only 
manual workers are oppressed, only manual workers are 
virtuous, only manual workers are patriotic. Class feeling 
is a power in politics, certainly, but it exerts itself in more 
than one direction. The instant a class appears pretend- 
ing to special merit and proposing political action in its 
interest, all other classes instinctively grow suspicious 
and hostile. It becomes to their interest to divide, antago- 
nize, and defeat the aggressive class. There are millions 
of men in this nation who are quite as earnest in their dis- 
like of plutocratic dominance as Mr. Debs or his horny- 
handed followiug, who yet feel that however bad present 
conditions may be they would not be bettered by the work- 
ingmen getting the upper hand. The spirit and methods 
of the average trades-union are not so high-minded, and 
just, and mild, as to inspire a general desire to see them 
extended to the Government of the United States. That 
is one of the reasons why the workingmen make so con- 
spicuous a failure politically. The French Revolution was 
in its ultimate effects a good thing for mankind, doubtless, 
but the first consequences of going upon the assumption 
that the "people" are simple, amiable, well-meaning 
creatures, appalled the world, and taught it a lesson that 
the " friends of labor " will never, with all their rhetoric, 
printed and spoken, he able to make it forget. Until the 
American workingmen speak and act politically as citizens 
and not as workingmen, the great majority of citizens who 
are not workingmen will inevitably combine against them. 
To feel sorry for the wrongs under which the populace suf- 
fer is one thing, to vote to give the reins of power into 
their hands is another. Most civilized men who know some- 
thing about what the world was and how it came to be 
what it is, will choose to bear the ills they have rather 
than fly to those which they know are inseparable from the 
rule of an uninstructed, class-prejudiced majority. Indi- 
viduals like Debs are often admirably sincere and very 
earnest,, but, unhappily, just in proportion as they are sin- 
cere and earnest are they likely to do mischief — not only 
to society at large, but to the very class for whose welfare 
they are aflame with enthusiasm. The capacity of any 
body of men for self-government is measured by the qual- 
ities of the leaders whom they select. The surest sign of 
unfitness is distrust and dislike of superiority. While, 



July 17, 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS 1.I-: 1 



and \gl 

- who flatter servilely that they may 
*, the workingmen will Bnd them 
tically in the minority, though they form the 
numerical majority. There are other people in the world 
who have rights to main tain, ii I protei t. besides 

the workingmen. Lei us hope ili.ii Debs gives 9ome >f his 
suent days in jail t<> pondering thi~ pregnant truth, which 
"labor' is so prone to overlook, and that the multitude of 
workers who look up to him as a leader may be brought to 
ler it likewise. A.. ol always a 

certificate of good character, any more than the natural 
desire to escape from poverty is a proof of ability to re- 
organize society in such a manner as to make life better 
worth living for one's neighbor as well as for oneself. What 
labor needs most is more use of its brains and less of its 
voice. How to bring i( to understand this is the real "social 
problem'' of the time. 

Unfa.r The revision of the assessment rolls by 

Assessments. County Boards of Equalization is this year 

a^ irritating as usual. A property owner 
who appeals to them to have his assessment reduced has 
little show of redress. Their reply to his protest generally 
consists of a statement that similar land to his, in the same 
locality, has been assessed on the same scale, and that the 
owner has not protested. Neither the Board nor the As- 
sessor takes into account that the non-protesting owner 
may be absent, or sick, or one of those torpid individuals 
who do not take the trouble to protect their rights, and 
that it is unfair to his neighbors to use his silence as an 
excuse to over-tax them. There is but one rule by which 
an honest Assessor can be guided in valuing property for 
taxation; that is to determine its value by ascertaining 
what it would sell for. It is not just to tax a piece of land 
on a valuation which is more than it would command at a 
forced sale. Fancy values should be set aside as cutting 
no figure in the case. Five or six years ago there was a 
boom in real estate in several counties south of San Fran- 
cisco, and while the boom lasted land changed hands at 
prices which had never been reached before, and have not 
been touched since. It is very unfair to take these boom 
prices as the basis of an assessment, and yet that is what 
a number of Assessors have done. There is no county in 
the State in which there are no dealers or brokers in real 
estate. In every one a certain number of level-headed 
men can value property within a few hundred dollars of 
the price it would fetch if it were sold at auction. Any 
old farmer, living in the neighborhood, can guide the 
. Assessor with a close approach to accuracy. There is 
really no excuse for over-assessment. Instead of seeking 
such expert counsel, many Assessors are barking back to 
the absurd figures which were touched during the boom, 
and especially if the owner is a non-resident or a rich man, 
is making them the basis of his assessment. Boom figures 
should not be considered at all. They were based not on 
intrinsic values, but on a wild speculation which only lasted 
a few months, and was the means of assisting a few 
gamblers to deplete their pockets. An Assessor who 
knows his business will no more consider them than a mer- 
chant would base his operations on the price of wheat 
when the market is cornered. 

The Ross It is amusing to observe the complacency 
Decision, with which the morning papers are reversing 
the decision of Circuit Justice Ross on the Ir- 
rigation Law. As he is only a Justice of the U. S. Supreme 
Court and one of the soundest and most thorough lawyers 
on the Coast, there is, of course, an obvious propriety in 
his judgments being subject to review by the unknown gen- 
tlemen who write editorials for the Examiner, the Call, and 
the Chronicle. It is fortunate for us that we have such an 
appellate tribunal to correct the Judge's errors. It is 
hard to say what we should do if they neglected their ap- 
pellate jurisdiction. As a matter of fact, what Judge 
Ross has decided is simply that irrigation works are not 
works of such a public character that land may be taken 
for their construction without the consent of the owner. 
Land may be condemned and taken for the construction of 
a railroad, or a turnpike, or a canal, and the owner must 
content himself with the damages which a jury may award; 



the invasion of I stifled on the ground 

that theroiitenii for the public bene 

tit. und thai tin 11a - must yield to those 

of the oommunil 1 1 ording'to Ji 

an Irrigating ditch is not designed for the benefit of the 

community at large, I ir the benefit of the owners 
of land which require irrigation, which may not comprise 

all the land in the distn. ) Therefore, the Wright Law. 

which extended tin- privilege of eminent domain to Irriga- 
tion District organizations, is in violation of the liili of 
[lights and the Constitution of the United States, ami i- 

null and void, The question is still an open our. for many 

state Courts, whose decisions an' entitled to respect, have 
decided it in the opposite sense to Judge Koss. There is 
also, »e believe, a decision of the Supreme Court to the ef- 
fect that tin- reclamation of swamp lands is a public im- 
provement, for which land may be condemned, Hut as to 
the former, it must be remembered that, from the time the 
Wright Law was la-t amended, vigorous and persistent 

efforts have 1 n made to Boat irrigation bonds, and that 

a Superior Court or Supreme Court Judge who had de- 
cided against the law would have made himself intensely 
unpopular; and. as to the latter, a swamp reclamation en- 
terprise benefits all tin- land in the district, which an irri- 
gation system may not do. The decision of the Los An- 
geles Judge will go to Washington for review, and will be 
reversed or confirmed by the lies) legal minds in the coun- 
try. It is greatly to be feared that the appeal will destroy 
the last hope of the unfortunate English investors who put 
their money into Irrigation Bonds. 

The British The elections, up to July 25th, shows a net 
Elections. gam of 81 for the Conservatives, which is 
more than a working majority for Salisbury. 
The Liberal strength is reduced to 146, too small a number 
to embarrass the administration; the British Unionists 
will occupy the position which the Republicans will fill in 
the fifty-fourth Congress, while the followers of Gladstone 
will play the part reserved in this country for the Demo- 
crats. Under the Parliamentary system in force in Eng- 
land the Salisbury government will retain power, and 
carry their measures until they are deserted by nearly a 
hundred of their followers. So firm a tenure naturally 
provokes inquiry into the party principles which are now 
to prevail under Lord Salisbury. And here we are con- 
fronted with a strange puzzle. The English Tories have 
no affirmative principles; what we should call the planks of 
their platform are all negative. They are opposed to 
Home Rule; they are opposed to interference with the 
House, of Lords; they are, as a general rule opposed to all 
the radical reforms which were darkly hinted at by Lord 
Rosebery; but if they have any definite measures of policy 
of their own to propose to Parliament they are not gen- 
erally known. At the Congress at Constantinople, and 
afterward at the Congress of Berlin, Salisbury was with 
Disraeli an exponent of the Tory policy of England on the 
Eastern question, and he may now take ground in favor of 
the submission of the Armenian question to a joint com- 
mission. Eight years ago he was in favor of reforming the 
House of Lords by creating life peers; since then the Lib- 
eral assaults on the Upper House have probably induced 
him to recede from the advanced position he then took. 
He is a conservative man, as is natural in one who has 
been in office, with brief intervals, for over twenty years; 
he never showed Disraeli's jingo propensities. So far as 
he has shown his hand he is friendly to this country, though 
of course he is not a believer in democratic institutions. 
He is a particular favorite with the Queen, who went to 
stay with him at Hatfield in the Jubilee year. How long 
the' Parliament which is now being elected will last de- 
pends on events which cannot now be foreseen. There are 
in the breasts of the English people two opposing currents, 
one tending to democracy, the other following the old con- 
servative channels. When nothing happens to disturb 
men's minds, and no stirring questions are on the tapis, 
the latter generally preponderates; but any day an acci- 
dent, a blunder by a Tory government, an example of mis- 
conduct by a member of the hereditary class, or a humilia- 
tion of England by a foreign power, may rouse the demo- 
cratic feeling to life, and in an hour the conservative in- 
stinct may vanish. That is the contingency of which it be- 
hoves Lord Salisbury to beware. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 



The Governor's Governor Budd is like the rest of man- 
Weakness, kind in lacking some quality the posses- 
sion of which would be valuable to him. 
His deficiency is in executive ability — the talent which en- 
ables one to employ the energies of others. The Governor's 
dignity, as well as his usefulness, suffers through his dispo- 
sition to jump in and try to do everything himself. His most 
recent manifestation of this weakness would have sub- 
jected him to annoying ridicule had the State which he 
governs not been blessed with a press that frowns upon 
humor. It was told in confidence to Mr. Budd that a ring 
of rascals was using the machinery and labor of the San 
Quentin prison to manufacture jute bags for private profit. 
Two small and suspicious books, supposed to contain a part 
of the secret accounts, were placed in his hands. Enough 
was communicated to the Governor to justify him in insti- 
tuting an investigation. It is always in order to investi- 
gate public institutions. An ordinary Governor would 
have thought it sufficient to delegate the duty to an agent, 
but Governor Budd is not that sort of official. Were he to 
see a man sweeping the corridors of the capitol carelessly, 
he would seize the broom and do the sweeping himself — do 
it lovingly, and enjoy the wonder of the awed spectators. 
So Mr. Budd, with a staff of admiring politicians, descended 
upon San Quentin and personally conducted the trial of its 
officers on the charge of being jute-bag rogues. One of 
the mysterious books turned out to be a private affair of a 
faithful shipping clerk, who used it to keep a check upon 
the convict bookkeepers under him; the other was joy- 
fully recognized by an old employee interested in the 
weather who had lost it — lost it with all its precious data, 
noted in shorthand, relative to the meterological phenom- 
ena observable at San Quentin. Respect for the august 
position of Mr. Budd restrained the suspected and exon- 
erated prison officials from either resenting his want of re- 
spect for them, or laughing at his discomfiture. He was 
obliged in the end to bear testimony to the high efficiency 
of the. management which he had expected to cover with 
the disgrace of exposure. Incidentally he was denied the 
pleasure of doing a bit of practical politics on which his 
heart is set — the removal of sundi-y directors and the 
appointment in their stead of gentlemen who have the 
superior qualification of being his friends and supporters. 
Mr. Budd has gone to Klamath Springs for the treatment 
of the rheumatism, physical and political, that has resulted 
from his fruitless labors at the penitentiary. He could not 
in. 11c wisely employ his leisure there than in the uprearing 
of a number of good resolutions. First among these should 
be the determination to surrender to subordinates here- 
after all the toil and glory of the Administration's detective 
work. The second ought to be a strong vow to let small 
politics alone — to appoint officials because of their indi- 
vidual fitness, and to leave them entirely free from his in- 
fluence in tin- selection of their underlings. Thus resolved, 
the time will sooner come when California's Chief Magis- 
trate shall be known to the world as the Hon. James H. 
Budd instead of as plain Jim. 



Men of Letters Letters did not fare well at the election 
In Politics. in England. Parliament is a heavy loser 
by the defeat of John Morley, and it is a 
pity that Rider Haggard, the author of "She," has been 
chosen to stay at home. Both men had some political ex- 
perience; both possessed culture far above the average of 
that of the ordinary country squire. Morley is a man of 
astonishing distinction. He combines qualities which are 
rarely united in the same individual. He is a cyclopedia of 
knowledge, having edited the Fortnightly for years; he 
owns a vigorous and trenchant pen; he speaks clearly, 
forcibly, and persuasively; he makes a capital presiding 
officer; his courage is unquestioned, and his principle high. 
He embraced the cause of Home Rule in Ireland when- it 
was a subject of derision among his friends, and he stuck 
to it when it seemed likely to involve the ruin of his politi- 
cal prospects; he did not desert it when the Irish, after 
their wont, stabbed him in the back at Newcastle. Such 
a man cannot easily be replaced at St. Stephens. In 
France, literary distinction is a common stepping stone to 
political preferment. Young men of literary ability con- 
nect themselves with the press, and then loom up in the 
chamber. In this country, as in England, the rule is dif- 



ferent. A notion prevails that a man of letters can better 
serve his country by sticking to his profession than by en- 
tering political life. Still, there have been remarkable ex- 
ceptions. Of the Cambridge set, Lowell attained high 
rank as a statesman, being overtopped by few, if by any, of 
our diplomatic corps. George William Curtis must be 
classed among our public men, though he never filled an 
elective office. He would have liked to go to Congress in 
the later sixties, but he never could get a nomination. 
Editors of political newspapers have frequently been seen 
in the House of Representatives; but, unless we count 
Blaine as an exception, none of them ever made a mark. 
Greeley, Raymond, and Watterson were failures on the 
floor. Three conspicuous examples of public men in Eng- 
land who graduated from the field of letters will occur to 
the reader — to wit: Sheridan, Bulwer, and Disraeli. The 
first named was at the head of the theatrical world, famous 
and rich, when he condescended to enter Parliament. He 
owed the success he achieved to the fervor of his eloquence 
and the wonderful expression of his face. Bulwer was one 
of the richest landed proprietors in England when he added 
a seat in Parliament to his other possessions. Disraeli 
was over thirty and a famous novelist when he did the 
same thing. Of course, literary distinction is no natural 
bar to political ability, but in practice great writers are 
rarely of the paste of which statesmen are made. 

Why Not There is a monotony in the news from Cuba 
Free Cuba ? which is wearisome. First comes a dispatch 
stating that the Government troops have 
met the rebels and dispersed them, with considerable loss 
of life ; this is followed by -another telegram announcing 
that the rebellion has broken out in a new spot, and that 
fighting men are flocking in droves to the banner of Free 
Cuba. But whatever the dispatches recount, the net re- 
sult is the same — the war goes on. It has been so for forty 
years. In the old days, the flame of Cuban disloyalty was 
fanned by American filibusteros, who were set on by the 
slave owners. Everybody remembers the Ostend manifesto, 
which was signed by Buchanan and Soule, and which notified 
Spain that she must either sell Cuba to the United States 
or they would take it. This brigand pronunciamento suf- 
ficed to keep alive the fire of sedition till our own war 
broke out. Spain was driven to her wit's end to keep her 
province. At the present day there are no more slave 
owners in this country, and no one wants Cuba. But the 
insurrections go on, and parts of the island are chronically 
under martial law. Spain, having recovered the serenity 
of her temper, has made several attempts to conciliate the 
islanders. The last of these was the act passed by the 
Cortes in 189!-i, granting the suffrage to all adult Cubans' 
who paid five dollars a year in taxes. It did not satisfy 
anybody. The rich planters were disgusted at having to 
share the electorate with white vagabonds, and the vaga- 
bonds insisted that the property qualification was an insult 
and a violation of the true principles of democracy. The 
war — if that can be called a war which consists of a raid by 
disciplined troops and followed by an immediate dispersion 
of the insurgent bands — goes on as before. The simple 
truth appears to be that the Spaniards have made a failure 
of the government of Cuba, as they have made a failure of 
colonial government everywhere. The} were unable to re- 
tain a single colony on the mainland of this hemisphere, 
and the government of the Philippines is the opprobrium 
of the age. In former days. Spain kept Cuba for what 
there was in it. The Captain-General expected to make a 
million in three years. Now no money is made — at least 
legitimately — by that official, and the mother country is 
out of pocket every year that she keeps the colony. Why 
should she not let it go, and shout with the filibusteros : 
"Cuba for the Cubans '!" 

ftNGLOMANIACS in America may learn a useful lesson 
by contrasting the late election in England with a 
like political contest in this country. Disgraceful rowdy- 
ism was exhibited at many of the English polling places. 
In several instances candidates were mobbed, and the 
office of one newspaper was assailed with stones. Even 
ladies were subjected to insult, by crowds of excited 
voters. Occurrences of this sort are almost unknown at 
general elections in the United States. 



July : 7 . 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A Cry From One of the chid ditl mail- 

the 
Rock Quitfiei. 

oul pre- the dir. 

tt»' institution Too often the 

fart to nap 

from their labor In tin- South this has led to 

>es, through the adoption of the contract system, 

under which the unfortunate prisoners were worked out of 

Athers, exposed to the lash, like slaves, and 

herded in Blockades at night. In this state the treatment 

- has alwa>> been humane, and public sentiment 
ha> Invariably opposed every attempt to introduce the 

system. But the prison directors have been 
greatly hampered l>y the opposition of labor organizations, 
and of manufacturers to any form of remunerative work 
h as woul.l result in competition with the 
products of free labor. There was. tor example, much ob- 
jection to the output of dressed granite, or even rough 
granite blocks, from the Folsom penitentiary, on the part 
of the quarry men at Rocklin and other points. The int re- 
duction of bag making at San Quentin was an effort to 
avoid sueh objection from the labor elements, it being an 
• rv in which very few white men were engaged in this 
But even this lias been the occasion of much pro- 
1 1n- establishment of bag factories on a 
small scale at various points in the interior. In fact, no 
matter in what sort of manufacturing the convicts may be 
red, the cry of "cheap prison labor" is raised, and 
complaint is made that bread is being taken from the 
mouths of the honest working-men. Just now a protest is 
heard against the employment of convict labor at Folsom, 
to furnish broken stone suited to the macadamizing of 
highways. An Act of the last Legislature pro- 
vided for the creation of a Bureau of Highways, 
and for the establishment at Folsom prison of a plant for 
the crushing of rock, conditional upon low rates of freight 
being made by the railroad, and upon orders being ob- 
tained for a certain minimum quantity. The orders were 
secured, through the efforts of the energetic Commission- 
ers. Messrs. Manson and Irvine, and the Risdon Directors 
irdingly procured the necessary machinery. The in- 
evitable protest has arisen in Alameda County, where a 
number of quarry owners have hitherto profited from the 
demand for broken stone for road purposes. It is com- 
plained that the closing of the Alameda quarries will throw 
hundreds of men outof work. But it would be an easy matter 
for the Risdon Directors to so adjust the charges for the 
broken stone as not to ruinously undersell the producers in 
Alameda County within their own territory. The latter 
cannot, however, reasonably expect that immoderately 
high charges will be imposed, for the benefit of a few 
quarry owners and their employees, and to the prejudice 
of the public, who have a vital interest in road improve- 
ment. The farmers, fruit growers, and land owners gen- 
erally, much more than the bicycle riders and the people 
who drive horses for pleasure, would be immediately bene- 
fited by the macadamizing of the country roads. It is to 
be hoped that no obstacles interposed by selfish private in- 
terests will serve to obstruct the practical plan of road 
improvement which the late Legislature so auspiciously 
set in motion. The furnishing of broken stone for roads 
and streets is about the most useful and the least objec- 
tionable employment to which convict labor can be applied. 

The Debate Be- The newspapers throughout the 
tween country have printed full reports of 

Harvey and Horr. the long-drawn debate on the silver 
question, between Messrs. Harvey 
and Horr. As was to be expected, days of preliminary 
skirmishing preceded discussion of the main point, which 
is that of the resumption of free coinage by the United 
States, at the ratio of 16 to 1, or any other ratio that 
may be agreed upon. This is the present issue, and the 
nub of the whole controversy. But the disputants 
lingered a long time on such antecedent questions as 
whether demonetization in 1873 was or was not surrepti- 
tious and a "crime." For all practical purposes, it makes 
little, or no difference in these days whether Congress in 
1873 knew what it was about when it dropped the silver 
dollar from the list of standard coins, leaving the gold 



light upon the 1 isputatkra 

over 1c 

man Horr hod thi tool the argument. He dem 

onstrated that the froi coinage In the United 

state- luld have I I of driving gold from 

circulation in this country. In other words, it would put 
the United Stab To many of the advo- 

cates of free coinage the contemplation of this result 

would have no tenors Hut financiers, and studentsof 

political economy generally, may readily foresee the dis- 
astrous effects of such a violent change from the gold to 
the silver standard. The workers for wages, it is clear, 
would be the chief sufferers. The purchasing power of the 

silver dollar would necessarily decline, while wages would 

remain at the old figures until such time as strikes and 

other efforts on the part of workingmen could force them 
upward. The disturbance in all lines of business would be 
great and long continued, in COI18equence of the radical ivin 
lotion in the standard of values, and the readjustment 
would be painful to the vast majority of all concerned. 
The advocates of the go-it-alone policy profess to believe 
that the United Stall's is "great enough and powerful 
enough to have an independent financial system of its 
Own. But well-informed persons, who realize to what an 
enormous extent the prosperity of this country is depend- 
ent upon commercial relations with Great Britain and 
other foreign nations, perceive the absurdity of such a 
notion. Were tliis country put upon a silver basis, the 
rates of exchange would be greatly against America in 
all the markets of Europe, where the gold standard is uni- 
versal. What should be aimed at is international bimetal- 
lism ; that is, a compact among commercial nations for the 
free coinage of gold and silver at an agreed ratio. There 
is good reason to believe that this would result in the 
restoration of silver to its old status. That would give us 
true bimetallism. But should the United States alone open 
its mints to the free coinage of silver, the effect to be ex- 
pected would be silver monometallism, with a long train of 
disastrous consequences, closing with an ultimate return 
to the gold standard. Foreign nations would cheerfully 
stand aioof and withhold their aid, quite content to see 
this country made the market for all their surplus silver. 

Street Paving It is to be hoped that the excitement 
and the created by the Call, in criticising the acts 

Dollar Limit, of a majority of the Board of Supervisors, 
will not have the effect to postpone the 
work of paving the streets of the city, many of which are 
in a deplorable condition, and the principal ones the most 
disgraceful of all. The matter of paving Van Ness avenue 
is one which should be attended to without delay. Many 
years ago that beautiful and expansive thoroughfare, 
capable of being converted into a magnificent boulevard, 
was laid out and planned to invite capitalists and business 
men to invest and build handsome residences. In ihe heat 
of the excitement, which was equal to a Los Angeles real 
estate boom, many of that class did invest, and have erected 
elegant homes. They have waited for the promised im- 
provements which would beautify that avenue. A spurt 
was made at its intersection with Market street by laying 
two or three blocks with bituminous rock pavements, when 
the blighting form of a "one dollar limit" spread a pall 
over the city and paralyzed progress. In that unfinished 
condition that splendid avenue still remains, an eyesore to 
beholders and a plague to those who had invested their 
money in great expectations. No property owner would 
hesitate paying his proportion of the cost in making such 
an improvement. One-dollar limit died for lack of vigor, 
and its supporters have become back numbers in the man- 
agement of public affairs. During its existence San Fran- 
cisco suffered from dry rot. Golden Gate Park, which was 
not in its grasp, is the only object that disarms criticism. 
It is no doubt true that numbers of Boards of Supervisors 
have fattened on contracts in the past, and may attempt 
to do so in the future, but the shameful condition of the 
streets of the city at the present time demands some at- 
tention, and the present Board have it in their hands to 
make a bright record by pushing the work, and no citizen 
who has any pride will object to a two-dollar limit, if neces- 
sary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 




THERE is no question but that Californians have a star 
talent for keeping themselves before the public. 
There is certainly something dramatic in California's 
atmosphere that it is rarely one can mention the name of 
a native son or [laughter without eliciting the reply, ''That 
reminds me, " followed by a tale sometimes glorious, some- 
times slanderous, but never lacking in the thrilling 
element. 

The latest story involves Casper Warrington Whitney, 
who years ago was a cadet in St. Matthews school in San 
Mateo and whose name is still, no doubt, familiarly known 
in California through his achievements in journalism. Mr. 
Whitney, who has done remarkably good work in the 
sporting department of uumerous periodicals, notably the 
Harper publications, and whose recent book on out-of- 
door sports in England is regarded as an authority, con- 
ceived the idea several months ago of attempting to pene- 
trate the great Northwest as far as the Arctic Circle. 
This colossal undertaking he has brought to a successful 
conclusion, having traveled nineteen hundred miles on 
snowshoes and five hundred miles in boats and canoes. 
His only companions on this arduous trip were Indian 
guides, and he is the first white man who has accomplished 
the journey in winter — a new honor for a native California 
son of the Golden West. This is the glorious side of the 
story, the other side is less pleasing. Mr. Whitney 
married several years ago an exceedingly beautiful woman 
who evidently has not shared the public enthusiasm for 
her husband's attainments. Not to be out-done, however, in 
visiting strange countries, Mr. Whitney's charming young 
spouse verified a rumor of conjugal unhappiness by seeking 

the. wilds of Oklahoma soon after his de- 

parture, and returned after a few weeks' 
absence a free and un trammeled divorcee! 
In the meantime the domestic affairs of a 
certain well-known club man in New York, 
one Charles Baudoine, were the subject of 
much gossip in Gotham. Baudoine was a 
young, good looking, and rich fellow who 
several years ago was married to Miss 
K utter, daughter of a wealthy broker in 
New York. Last winter this lady and her 
child returned to her father's home. In 
the subsequent divorce suit the name of 
the co-respondent was carefully concealed. 
Baudoine is a great coaching man and all 
during last spring pretty Mrs. Whitney 
was seen on the box seat of his handsomely 
appointed coach. 

Yesterday morning she again occupied 
this position and was one of the merry 
party. She was arrayed in white satin 
and carried a large bunch of lilies of the 
valley. The coach crossed the Hoboken 
ferry, was driven to the Lutheran Church, 
and Mr. Baudouie and Mrs. Whitney were 
made one. Jersey is more complaisant 
concerning the marriages of divorced peo- 
ple than rigged New York. 

Riggid New York, by the way, is out- 
doing itself in the way of purifying its morals. 
We had recently to learn not only the 
iniquity of alcoholic drink, absorbed in the 
open air, but have since had a lesson warn- 
ing us of the vices of drinking soda water or 
eating fruit purchased on the Lord's Day. 
That enticing demon, the cigar store 
Indian, has been ordered indoors on the 
Sabbath, while the hairy man who does not 
know how to wield his razor must show him- 
self on Sundays unshaven before the world. 
We are as yet allowed to breathe. 

The mania has penetrated the domestic 
circle and many cooks refuse to prepare 
food on the holv day. We are almost back 



to the days of Cotton Mather — moving rapidly. As the 
clever weekly said the other day we are becoming a jay 
town. 

"Jack" Casserley has returned from his visit to West- 
chester and is now at the Brunswick. 

Harry S. Martindale, the crack cross country rider of 
the Genessee Valley Hunt, who is well-known in San 
Francisco society, has just returned to America after an 
absence abroad of more than two years. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Crocker are going to Newport 
for a short visit. Mrs. Crocker's daughter, Miss Ruther- 
ford, will be the guest for some time of Mrs. Hermann 
Oelrichs. 

Robert Brent Mitchell arrived from San Francisco a few 
days ago — failing in an effort to reach his aged mother be- 
fore her death. He accompanied his sister to Baltimore 
for the funeral and returned to Morristown, New Jersey, 
on last Monday. Next Monday night will see him on his 
way to California. John Doyle will also be amongst next 
week's departures for your city, having been delayed here 
for several days longer than he had intended remaining. 

Mrs. Blauvelt and daughters are again at Swiftwater, 
where they spent last summer. Miss Blauvelt graduated 
from Ogoutz, and was a classmate of the Countess 
Castellane. 

The engagement has been announced of Miss Mary 
Beales, grand-daughter of the late Eugene Kelly, to Mi-. 
James Rich Steers. The marriage will take place some- 
time in the early winter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wood registered at the Fifth 
Avenue. They are to leave town soon to make a round of 
the watering places. 

New York, July Kith, 1895. Passe-Partout. 

The Survival of the Fittest. 
Furniture moved, stored, packed, and shipped at low rates by Morton 
Special Delivery. Only experienced men employed. Equipment flrst- 
lass. Offices— 31 Geary street, and 408 Tay lor street. 



H ^^^Wffn^nff^^WV^WfV^WWqf W WW^WfWW^ W 



3 Million, 134 Thousand, 9 Hun- 
dred and Thirty-four Packages 
sold iu 1894, which made 15 
Million, 674 Thousand, 7 Hun- 
dred and Thirty-five Gallons of 




MIRES 

Rootbeer 

or 313 Million, 494 Thousand, 
7 Hundred glasses, sufficient to 
give every man, woman and 
child in the United States, five 
glasses each — Did you get yours? 
Be sure and get some this year ? 
The whole family will enjoy it. 
A 25 cent package makes 5 gal- 
lons. Sold everywhere. Made 
only by 

The Chas. E. Hires Co., Philada. 



,| """******»»**************"*-*- mm -r n.rLrLTLruuui- 




TftADt MARX 

Tcamltig Borax In DfatkVally Cat. 



A 20 MULE HELP F0R KITCMEM — LAUHDRY. 

RUCIflC C0A5T BORAX CO. SfRAflCISCO-OtlC/WO-fltWYORK 



July 27. 1895. 



FR \N\ 



LOCAL APHORISMS. 

■ .' .' 
• • 1 1 , 'Solid J 

"Whan the Lord k»i 1 'li /.'■ ■ ./ • • 

•It il for 1n.11: 1. 

•• Every ilay oamv -■ of lanter '■/ ■!• V. 

tl'ltlh 

" If the religion can be made profitable there will be 
plenty of 'verts " - // S 

ild and goods may 1 e losf buf a i.'<«xl name wil 
man a lifetime. Davidson. 

idify thyself with the masses before election— with 
the Governor after."-— Adolpli Sutro. 

" Vice requires no schoolmaster ; it is learnt without a 
teacher." — Warden Halt, San Quentin, 

" A man may f_'o to Heaven with half the pains it takes 
to purchase bell. ' — " Dick" McDonald, 

" If the wine is good your head will be bad and your 
story '.viil be long. — General Dickinson. 

"The man who is afraid to use his riches does not de- 
serve to have them." — Charles Wieland. 

"The stage I The stage is the thing." — Blandu Bates, 
after being divorced from Itieutenanl Davis. 

"Take an old man's advice: Never cross a bridge until 
you come to it. — " Uncle " Georgi Bromley. 

"One tongue is enough for half a dozen women." — Mis. 
Annu Smith, Woman's JFrei Suffrage CVub. 

"It is the bait that lures, not the length of the rod or 
the skill of the fisherman." — Dr. Harry Tevis. 

"Fame is but the breath of the multitude, and that is 
often unwholesome." — General 11" //. L. Barnes. 

"No matter where a man dies, the road to Heaven is the 
same length from all lands.'' — Rabbi Voorsanger. 

"A flirt may change her opinions of others but she 
never changes the good opinion she has of herself." — 
Carlton Coleman. 

INCONSISTENT METHODS OF TAXATION. 

HERE is inconsistency : The city of Sacramento assessed 
the property of the Southern Pacific in that county at 
$922,000. After the assessment was made the company's tax 
agent induced the Board of Supervisors, sitting as a Board 
of Ecpualization, to reduce the assessment about one half, 
making it $466,660. This was done, and forthwith there is 
a howl about " protecting capital " in the press, and it is 
loudest among those papers that are always shouting 
" protection for our industries." Now, if it is right for 
this country to give a premium to manufacturers "in or- 
der to encourage home production " is it not equally right 
for every city in the country to " protect" the works al- 
ready within their limits and to encourage them to expand? 
If it is right to "protect" the beet root sugar factory at 
Chino at the expense of the consumers of the State and the 
county, is it not equally right to protect the property of 
the Southern Pacific at the expense of the county of Sac- 
ramento ? If the factory left Chino the people in that 
neighborhood would suffer, but if the work shops of the 
Southern Pacific left Sacramento that city would be seri- 
ously crippled, and if it is right to "protect " Chino, that 
costs the county so much money, it is doubly right to pro- 
tect the Southern Pacific, that has done, and is doing, so 
much to build up the State. 



The Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street, has so secure'y 
established itself as the place which furnishes the best confects, sup- 
pers, elc. , at the shortest notice, that it would be idle to speak of com- 
petition in connection with this establishment. Whenever any event 
requiring skillful and polite service and the highest products of the 
chef's and baker's arts, the Original Swain's Bakery is invariably the 
choice. 

Tbe Press Clipping Bdreau, 510 Montgomery street, S. F. reads all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies clippings on all topics, business 
and personal. 



Try a 
Bottle of 
Evans 1 India 
Pale Ale. 

If you want 
Richer Blood 



tin ti 



i" drink 



EVANS 1 STOUT 




SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, 

Pacific Coast Agents, San BTanoIsoo, Portland, 
Lok Angeles 

Warren White SulpUur Springs, 



VIRGINIA 



C \v CULLEN & SON, 
Owners and Proprietors, 

Eight different waters, namely: White, Red, nod 
Season of 1895 Blue Sulphur. Alum. Iron, Arsenic. Chalybeate, and 

opens June 1st. Lithia On top of the •■Three Top Range '* of the 

Masamltten chain of Mountains. Elevation 2100 
reel above the sea. No Mosquitoes, Gnats, or 
Malaria. 
TpprjiQ, Per week, one person, $15; per month, one person, 
1 01 Mid* $40: two persons in one room $70. Special rates to 
parties of three or more. 
Good fishing, boating, and Bathing. Distance from 
Richmond & Danville Railroad, one mile; distance 
from Norfolk & Western, three miles; distance from 
Baltimore and Ohio, four miles. 

Oldest Summer Resort in the United States, Established 1734 



TH6 Stoneman House, 



YOSEMITE, VALLEY. 



The only hotel in the valley supplied with all modern con- 
veniences and improvements. From the verandas of the 
Stoneman the following famous points are clearly visible: 
Eagle Peak, Yosemite Falls, Indian Canyon, Royal Arches, 
North Dome, Washington Column, Tenaya Canyon, Cloud's 
Rest, Half Dome, and Grizzly Moran and Glacier Points. 
The rates of this hotel are from $2 to $4 per day, according to 
room or European plan. The rooms are all newly furnished, 
the beds unsurpassed, the table excellent, and the entire 
management above criticism. 



J. J. COOK. Proprietor. 



Pope House 



and COTTAGES. This well-known and popular 
Resort is now open for the reception of guests. 
Separate Cottages for families. Tennis and 
Croquet. Electric Cars to the beach and baths. 



SANTA CRUZ Cal. 



VICHY SPRINGS 



MENDOCINO COUNTY. Three miles from 
® Ukiah, the terminus of the S. F. and N. P. 

Railway. Only known natural electric water, 
Warm "champagne" baths. Situation, loca- 
tion and scenery not surpassed. Terms. $12 to $14 per week. Post-office 
and telephone at springs. WILLIAM DOOLAN, Proprietor. 




Max Abraham, 



Caterer. 



SALADS, Teas, etc., delivered 
at short notice. Weddings, 
Receptions, Breakfasts, Din- 
ners, Private Picnics, etc., at- 
tended to. 



426 Geanj St. 



Telephone 2358 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS tETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 





" We Obey No Wand but Pleasure 



Tom Moore. 



FINERO was in a jolly frame of mind 
when he evolved The Amazons, a quaint, 
fanciful piece of comedy which he aptly de- 
scribes as a farcical romance. It is comedy 
pure and simple; chaste enough for the 
*? : most respectable subscriber to the Home 
Journal, and, at the same time, clever enough to hold the 
interest of men or women of the world (who invariably pre- 
fer a good-natured caricature of the harmless idiosyncra- 
sies of their class to a dissection of its morals). 

The wife of a sporting Marquis misses three seasons of 
hunting: each time it is a girl. Rather than experience an- 
other disappointment, the Marquis dies. In touching mem- 
ory of the unrealized hopes of the deceased, the Marchioness 
rears her three beautiful, living monuments to a blighted 
ambition in the bifurcated garments of their fathers. The 
play opens when the girls have attained womanhood, its 
events occurring in a single day. In this brief time they 
are wooed and won by three of the most dissimilar charac- 
ters that ever peopled stageland. Notwithstanding the 
burlesque lines upon which Mr. Pinero has fashioned his 
droll humor, and the absolute fantastic improbability of the 
play from beginning to end, it moves with such a graceful 
ease and freedom from buffoonery that it is only after the 
final curtain that one realizes what a silly bit of nonsense 
it all is. This is the playwright's art; and Mr. Pinero is 
much more entertaining when naturalizing unrealities than 
when unbosoming himself of problems that, though true 
enough, neither instruct nor divert. 

In the last number of the Chap Book Mr. Zangwill semi- 
seriously objects to good titles for plays beiug wasted and 
misapplied: " No one should have the right to annex per- 
manently a title which his work does not justify. At the 
most he should have a five years' lease, and, if the work is 
very bad, so as by association to damage the value of the 
title, he ought even to be mulcted for dilapidations." Mr. 
Zangwill can find no fault with the appropriateness of Tin- 
Amazons — yet it is said that there was a regiment of bald 
pates and field glasses in the orchestra on the opening 

night in New York. 

* * * 

Miss Irving, Miss Florence, and Miss Tyree are the three 
girls who arc raised to disregard their sex, so far as attire, 
manly sports, and muscular development, are concerned. 
They all do well, but Miss Tyree's doughty Thomasin is 
prominently superior. She makes "Tommy" a royal good 
fellow, but withal a woman. Miss Irving's dash and im- 
pulsiveness give to "Noel" a graceful Tom-boy air. In 
the gymnasium scene, where she swings the Indian clubs, 
she makes a picture of girlish vigor and beauty that ideal- 
izes the athletic English girl she is portraying. No fault 
can be found with Miss Florence's acting of the compari- 
tively gentle Wilhelmina, but if she must play the guitar, 
a lesson in tuning would not be amiss. 

Litterly, a fellow who runs more to muscle than brains 
is rather an ungrateful part for Mr. Kelcey. In spite of 
its limitations, or rather, in artistic compliance with them, 
he plays Litterly with a rugged simplicity that admirably 
sustains the author's idea of dramatic contrasts in the 
three suitors. The Earl of Tweenwayes, a decadent remnant 
of an illustrious race, who has inherited a thousand of the 
family ills and infirmities — for which he is ever thankful, is 
played by Mr. Gottschalk. Through Tweenwayes, Mr. 
Pinero draws a caricature that is strong enough to sug- 
gest a motive. Mr. Gottschalk's presentation is fascinat- 
ingly repellant. As a piece of studious acting it is mas- 
terly ; as a character, it is the grotesque incarnation of 
blue blooded decay. Mr. Williams also has an eccentric 
comedy part, in fact, the most amusing in the play. As 
the French Count who adopts Anglomania to win "Lady 

"Willv," he is exquisite. 

* * * 

Tin- Jilt has never been considered one of Dion Boucicault's 
best plays, nor has it ever reached the popular success 
that many of his pieces have attained. Nevertheless, it is 



a good, vigorous play, alive with action and overflowing 
with that Celtic humor Boucicault knew so well how to 
write and play. The Jilt is a "horsey " play from post to 
finish. Its characters are all versed in the technicalities 
and idioms of the track, and there is an abundance of 
equine similes that are readily grasped in a city with the 
racing proclivities of San Francisco. Mr. FraWley is 
Myles O'Hara, the quick-witted Irish sportsman; and a 
fairly good Irishman Mr. Frawley makes, even if his utter- 
ances are somewhat deliberate for the sharp, pithy lines 
Boucicault wrote for the part he played himself, and his 
brogue lacking in that musical richness that bespeaks- the 
Irish gentleman. Katherine Gray does not come up to 
our expectations as the jilt. She plays evenly well through- 
out, but fails to take advantage of several dramatic possi- 
bilities that should never have been overlooked by an act- 
ress of her schooling. Mr. Arbuckle is favorably cast as 
Sir Budleigh, and does some earnest work. Mr. Osbourae 
is usually at his best when playing a part such as Wylie's, 
but he does not seem up to his mark this week. Colonel 
Tudor and his son Goeffrey are indifferently played by Mr. 
King and Mr. Blakemore. Mr. Leslie is capital as Daisy, 
the book-maker. It is a relief to see Miss McAllister in, a 
part where she has an opportunity of distinguishing her- 
self. Her Mrs. Welter is the best sustained character in 
the piece, and one of the best things she has done at the 
Columbia. Miss Archer and Miss Ross do but fairly well. 

* * * 

A Blotch Sheep has only one more week to run, commenc- 
ing with Monday evening's performance. The California 
has enjoyed good houses for the past two weeks, but, from 
Monday night on, immense audiences are expected. Miss 
Hattie Wells, the sensational dancer of the company, is to- 
introduce for the first time in this city the celebrated 
" Trilby " Dance. She is to appear as an exact counterpart 
of Du Maurier's heroine, and dauces with bare feet. 

* *■ * 

The Ensign, a naval drama dealing with the period of the 
Civil War, will be next week's attraction at the Columbia. 
The management has built elaborate and expensive 
scenery for this production, and Miss Lansing Rowan, who 
will make her first appearance in this city, has been en- 
gaged for one of the principal parts. The following week 
will be the last of the Frawley Company's present season, 
during which five of the best plays that they have pre- 
sented will be given as farewell performances. 

* # * 

Oscar Wilde's well-known play, An Ideal Husband, will 
be given Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday nights and 
Saturday matinee by the Lyceum Company at the Bald- 
win. The play is said to be one of the brightest of modern 
times, and besides its central story, which is a serious 
one, is brilliant with the epigrams that have made its 
author famous. On Thursday and Saturday nights Tin- 
Wife will be presented; The Case of Rebellious Susan will 
have another production on Friday night. 

* * * 

After a successful run of two weeks at the Tivoli. Satan- 
rlla will give way to Wallace's charming English opera, 
Maritana. The melodious gems of Maritana need no intro- 
duction; they are familiar to every country where music 
is performed or sung. Alice Carle, prima donna contralto, 
will make her first appearance as Lazarillo. 

* * * 

Too Much Johnson, which has just finished a triumphant 
season in New York, will appear with the original com- 
pany at the Baldwin on August 5th. 
* * * 

Paderewski has, it issaidby a German theatrical agency, 
been engaged for one hundred concerts in this country, 
and Rosenthal and Ondrick each for fifty, at $1,000 an even- 
ing for Paderewski and $500 a night for each of the other 
two artists. According to the same authority, Mmes. 
Albani, Calve, Melba, Trebelli, Sucher, and MM. Tamagno, 
Plunket, Green, Masini, and Leoncavallo also intend com- 
ing over in the fall. 

The emptying and refilling of the tanks of the Lurline Baths every 
evening at 10:30 o'clock has proved to be quite an interesting exhibi- 
tion. The expenditure of $100,000 has made it possible to refill the 
tanks every hour and a half with fresh salt water, pumped direct 
from the ocean. The baths are open at 6 o'clock every morning. 



Jul> 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 1.1 1 



LETTER FROM CASTLE CRAGS 

TBS gtrU .'lit up" by the Bix letter 

from here that they have iirovalled upon me I 
. line in their In-half. Truth !.■ tell, tin- criticism 

the f; ■ • in ttda mountain resorl is 

not unmoritoO. fur convent . m- quite put .mi one 

But then there i- not the ii^unl pomposity .if the 
San Rafael dowagers »ith their spiteful Whispers, nor the 
elaborates Monteltes. On the 

contrary, I j-you please 

style: which is as frv>li as it- atmosphere 

Not that the '• spiteful dowager" is missing; even here 
she has been rampant of late, and very much in evidence 
ird parties, but there an' so many merry, light- 
hearted girls! one or two beauties, like May Belle Gwin, 
for instance, and the Crocker family in two branches, the 
latter element being themotive power for the gaiety. Mrs. 
Clark Crocker, with her two lively daughters, Fanny and 
Julia, and Mrs. George Crocker, with her daughter. Alice 
Rutherford, are the head and front of all the fun. The 
Crocker girls have a constant stream of visitors from morn 
till night, and are always getting up some new device for 
the enjoyment of their guest-. The private theatricals 
which came off at their cottage lately was really a credit 
to all concerned. Mrs. Rutherford-Crocker is more swell 
in her line of entertainment, giving very elaborate lunch- 
eons and dinners, and a cotillion with costly favors is on the 
cards for the near future before the hegira to Del Monte. 
The life at the Crags is essentially a lazy one — people get 
up late, as a rule, and take a bountiful breakfast, lounge 
around the hotel or cottages, read, gossip, and eat again. 
The elderly dames play cards: the younger ones ramble, 
take rides, or climbs; the men go fishing or join the girls 
in their walks, but by dinner time every one is united, a 
spirit of jollity prevails, and a gamut of laughter, from 
the deep guffaw to the rippling treble, fills the air. Irv- 
ing Scott is always the center of mirth, and Fred Crocker 
the cynosure of bright glances. The Washington belles, 
the Misses Condit-Smith, have been loud in their expres- 
sions of delight at the good times Castle Crags affords. 
Beaux are neither numerous nor particularly eligible, 
taken as a whole, but individual cases (like Fred Crocker) 
make up in quality what is lacking in quantity, and of all 
the sentimental, provoking spots to be found it is the pine 
grove by moonlight! As to fashion and frills, the girls 
leave all that to the city folks. They come up here for a 
good jolly time, and they have it. That's the whole thing 
in a few words. Nellie. 

Castle Crags, .My 22, 1S95. 

CANNOT some machinist devise an automatic target 
that, when fired at, will give back fire for fire, and 
send out smoke for smoke, and thus lend to target practice 
some of the apparent conditions of "actual warfare ? Of 
course this automatic target would only fire blank car- 
tridges, but the noise and the smoke would help the sol- 
diers at practice to have a better conception of the condi- 
tions under which they would have to fire if out on a skirm- 
ish line in front of an enemy. In the case of the new three 
mile rifle it might be well that the targets would send back 
a return fire as if from field pieces, for with the new pow- 
der the noise of small arms would probably not be heard 
nor the smoke seen. 



WHATEVER may be the result of the discussion of the 
financial question between Horr and Harvey at Chi- 
cago, in educating the people on the vexed question, the 
attacks made tupon Harvey's pamphlet, called "Coin's 
Financial School," has caused such an immense demand for 
it that the sales are likely to make him a wealthy man. It 
may have been a scheme devised by the two gentlemen to 
improve their individual finances, and in the divvy Horr 
will not refuse to accept silver nor Harvey gold. 

Visit Laundry Farm, 
the terminus of the California Railway, Alameda County, for a pleas- 
ant day's outing. It is one of the most picturesque spots around the 
bay. No Sunday dancing and no liquors sold on the grounds. 

"El Monte" Hotel, Sausalito, is now open for the summer sea- 
son, at prices to suit the times. Hot and cold salt water baths are 
connected with the hotel. 



California Theatre 



.c"< 

l»n.i 



A BLACK SHEEP 

Kim lime lo w 

Trilby Dance. 
SecTrlll Ban Limbs"; Trllbj quaint d»no« 

lo Ibe MWeot -tram* of Ifc-n ic.lt " 

MUCH JOHN 



Baldwin Theatre- A1 ' HAV " A "* °° ■ "SB 

DANIEL KimiiM u THEATRE COMPANY 

modmj Dighu, tod Saturdaj 

AN IDEAL HUSBAND. 

Thursday Sniunl» nlgbbv THE iufi; 

Friday lilghl Till . . (SE OF REBELLIOUS SUSAN. 
Mon.iuy. Aufruaisii urn Qlllatta In 'Too Muon Johnson." 



Gn n m L, ^U.~-.± T Gem " Theatre of the ( 
OlUmuia I neatre- FrIediaiiaer.GottlobAOo., Li 
una Managers 
One week only. Commencing July SBth. Wit production of Ue 
glorluus naval <lr;ima. 

THE ENSIGN. 
Four stupendous scenes: Double deok scene of u s. Frigate 
Ban Jacinto; View ..f tin' liarlmrnf Havana. Cuba by moonlight; 
President's room In the White Hou6e; spm-.u-rk of the L'nited 
Stairs man-of-war. Presented bytbe emir.' Frawle; Company 
Our popular prices— Night, 16c . iic . sic . 75c. Saturday matl- 
nee. 150., 890 , . r ^ic 

IVOII Upera llOUSe. Proprietor ana Manager 

Last Nights of 

SATAN ELLA, 

Next week the beautiful opera, 

MARITANA. 

First appearance of Alice Carle, prima donna contralto. 
Popular Prices -^, c and 50c 



San Francisco, 
Cal 



Mechanics' Institute. 

28th INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 

Opens August 18th and closes September 14th, 184)5. 
Grand display of Home productions in art, science, and maim 
factures. 

Intending exhibitors should at once apply for space, for which 
there is no charge 

PRIVILEGES— Several bids for the following exclusive privi- 
leges will be received by the committee until Tuesday, July 22d 
at 6 P. M : Restaurant, ice-cream, soda, candy, root beer, waffles, 
pop-corn, perfumery. 

For specifications or any desired information apply at the office, 
31 Post St A S. HALLIDIE, President 

Mr. and Mrs. d. H. RosevVald, 

Will resume giving instructions on MONDAY, August 5th. 
Will be at home, 

922 Geary Street, 

To give time to applicants, on 

THURSDAY and FRIDAY, August 1st and 2d, 
From 2 to 4 p m . 

Rankin, Thomas X Go., 

THEATRICAL BUREAU AND AGENTS, 
916 MARKET ST., Columbian Building. Room 46. 
Professional talent for private entertainments furnished at 
short notice. Entire charge taken of same. Plays, sketches, 
etc., for sale or rent. Wanted, at all times, dramatic and 
vaudeville artists. Agents for C. D. Hess, Grease Paints 
and general stage make up. 

I II I 1AM RPnnARn Ttie English, actress, coaches ladies and gentle- 
LlLLlnlM ULUUrtriU. men for the dramatic professton; appearances ar- 
ranged. Shakespearean classes Wednesday evenings. SHAKESPEAR- 
EAN ACADEMY, 1)13 Hyde street. San Francisco, Cal. 



Wall Paper, 
Window Snades. 

Interior Decorating. 

G. W. Clark & Co. 



Largest Stock and Lowest Prices. 
Samples Sent. 



653 Market Street 



nn RirnRn 1 ^ RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genn- 
Uv\. rMOUnU o ine— A specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States, 
J. G. STEELE &. CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, $1 25; of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills, 
$3 50; of 400 pills, $6; Preparatory Pills, $2. Send for circular. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 




AUDITOR Broderick will probably vouch for the truth 
of this story, which will carry him back to the days 
when Louis Kaplan was appointed Registrar of voters and 
he was chief clerk. The large majority of the deputies 
was, naturally, of Semitic extraction — in fact, the Auditor, 
Warren Davis, George Corbell, Harry Marshall, Dave 
Nesfield, and a few others were the exceptions. One day 
young Sullivan, who was working in another department 
and was a son of one of the late proprietors of the Monitor, 
stuttered into the office and, walking up to Louis Schwartz, 
pulled out his watch, and said in alow voice: "Iw-w- 
want you to g-g-give me ten d-d-dollars on this and d-d-do 
it on the k-k-k-quiet. M-m-make out the t-t-ticket k-k-k- 
quick." Louis looked at him indignantly and roared: 
"Vat you take this office for, Gott in Himmel ? Don't 
you know as you vos in dem office of the Registrar von 
Voters? " " B-b-by gum," said Sullivan, in apparent con- 
fusion. " you'll ex-c-c-cuse me, w-w-wont yer ? I thought 
it was a pup-pup pup-pawnbroker's shop." On another 
occasion, when Mr. Sullivan came in to get his name regis- 
tered and placed on the precinct list, there was such a 
crowd that one of the clerks called out to another one to 
come to the counter and swear Mr. Sullivan in. Accord- 
ing to the relater, the clerk merely halloed to the inside 
office " Meyer, Meyer, komm e mal her! " Affiant declares 
that twenty-two Meyers all rushed out together, but per- 
haps he did uot count right. 

* * * 

There seems to be a marked difference between the 
principles of the American Protective Association, as 
taught by President Hudelson of the Grand Council of the 
State, and that practiced by the members of the order. 
In his public addresses he disrobes the order of sectarian- 
ism entirely, while the members practice a boycott of those 
who belong to the Catholic Church. There is inconsistency 
somewhere, and it cannot be less than a very serious one. 
President Hudelson, however, seems to be in line with 
heads of the order in other States, as was demonstrated a 
few days ago by the President of the order in Kentucky, 
who addressed the people of San Francisco at an open 
meeting at Metropolitan Hall, at which time he asserted 
that the order was not sectarian. This difference in preach- 
ing and practice makes it possible for the organization to 
approach dissolution with the solemnity that attends a 
funeral. Notwithstanding the enunciation of principles 
by those highest in authority in the councils of the organi- 
zation, is it not legitimate to ask these gentlemen why it is 
that, if the order is not sectarian, a professed Catholic 
cannot become a member of that organization ? 

* * * 

A prominent young scion of a wealthy family, now spend- 
ing the summer in San Rafael, is causing much woe for his 
mamma. He has been at the Home of the Inebriates twice, 
and to the Keeley cure between times. Notwithstanding 
these minor affairs, the young gentleman has just been 
put under the guardianship of the family lawyer because of 
the demands of a young woman who says that he is the 
father of her child. It seems that the girl left home with 
him four or five years ago, and secretly they have lived 
ever since as man and wife, which status the woman is 
about to ask to be restored. 

* # * 

Harry Simpkins — the ''Duke," as they call him at 
Burlingame — returned from his Alaskan tour on Thursday 
in splendid health and spirits, and with an actual beard! 
He left immediately for Del Monte, where he intends stop- 
ping until Monday. His brother-in-law, Mr. Coleman, met 
him, and gave him a short taste of urban life in the noon 
hours. 

Simpkins, it will be remembered, accompanied Talbot 
Clifton on the latter gentleman's long talked-of exploration 
of Alaska. That is to say, he agreed only to see him as 
far as Juneau. 

Tins he has achieved in his own finished stvle, and his 



narration of the event is already in the ears of Burlingame 
and Del Monte. 

Clifton, he says, started out with the most magnificent 
expedition that has ever been taken from Juneau. 

" 'I am going to penetrate the wilds,' said Clifton, 'and 
if I can I shall climb Mt. St. Elias, a feat in which the 
American Government has failed twice. There is a dis- 
pute about its lying within British territory. I hope to 
settle this by planting the British flag on its topmost 
peak. This will go far toward a decision in the case.' " 

Clifton had with him, when he started from Juneau, forty 
men, including Indians and guides, together with a para- 
phernalia that was perfect in all its equipment. He de- 
sires to eclipse Lord Lonsdale's famous McKenzie River 
trip of 1889, and if his determination sustains his hardi- 
hood he will discover things and regions which were never 
found before. 

In his famous visit to conquer the Yaqui Indians in the 
Gulf of California last year, Clifton was discouraged after 
the first month, and decided to wait until there were more 
conveniences of civilization in that vicinity, or until the 
weather was cooler. 

Now he contends that he is bound to succeed, because of 
his indifference to Arctic weather. The small arms and 
ammunition which he has taken are magnificent in their 
profusion. Clifton himself will carry an elephant rifle, such 
as they use in Africa and Ceylon. This is for the death of 
the first polar bear he encounters. 
* * * 

It is not to be denied that as a great body of people we 
are rigidly jealous and prone to nurse our wrongs, and if 
there is one subject on which a true American is sore it is 
the defection of men, made rich by chance, from the solid 
allegiance which they owe the United Sta tes to the ephem- 
eral dazzle of English glory. It is not necessary to run 
over the list of American millionaires who have debased 
themselves by bowing at the shrines of royalty and nobility. 
We know them all. Waldorf Astor is for a moment con- 
spicuous among the sinners whose gold is the only open 
sesame to London society and London clubs. Naturally 
the multi-millionaire of shoddy extraction loves the arcana 
of the swell set, the blue blood of the aristos of Plantagenet 
descent. Fortunately there are millions upon millions of 
undeveloped wealth in the New World, and the thew and 
sinew of both hemispheres is here to build up the manliness 
and integrity of the Stars and Stripes. The country does 
not miss the shekels which are diverted by plutocratic 
snobs to the channels of Old World dissipation, but it does 
hate to see one of its sons go wrong and truckle to titles. 
We are bartering our daughters for ducal strawberry 
leaves, and selling our virgins to degenerate scions of effete 
sires. Here and there we come across some Gladstonian 
type of a man like Claus Spreckels, or James Lick of 
patriotic memory, the immortal Peabody, and scores of 
other men who could not be tempted by the glitter of 
courts, but it must be confessed that at the present day 
most of the men who have the largest incomes at their 
command are in spirit divorced from the country which 
yielded the dross, and who desire to bathe to their fullest 
content in the waters of European gilded snobbery . Fancy 
Washington, Madison, Jackson, or in our own day General 
Grant, Hancock, or Samuel Tilden, putting money into 
the building of a yacht designed to beat an American 
clipper. Yet this is precisely what Astor is accused of 
having done. The Vanderbilts, Astors, and Goulds may 
excite the admiration of the country that was whipped in 
in 1776 and 1812, but their names will never be handed 
down to posterity as typical descendants of the old Dutch 
stock that made New York or of the sturdy pioneers of the 

Mayflower. 

* * * 

News from Japan announces that Edward A. Morphy, 
the newspaper man who went to Yokohama to report the 
recent war for the Examiner, has been given a secretary- 
ship at the American Legation. He has also become im- 
mensely proficient in the Japanese language, and can jab- 
ber away by the hour with a soupcon of the brogue. 

Prof. Doremtjs in his cbemical analysis of champagnes declares G. H. 
Mumm's Extra Dry the purest and most wholesome. Its importations 
during 1891 aggregate 80,778 cases, or M,764 cases more than any other brand. 



Juh 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



in was 



hair, 

IT. Albert 
favorite tneetinj 
i. run liv a man i ston. Judge 

and although high 
- now. in tl ■ was a^ fond 

; Jim Avers were run- 
the Express, Major Ben Truman owned the Star, and 
'••raid had just started, under Storke, in November, 
l s T:: There was fun all the time Hut one morning, about 
two o'clock, Mum' of the gang came into the Herald office 
and told how they had been building a huge bonfire about 
(our blocks away iii tlic sand Everybody had contributed 
wood, eoal oil, packing cases and inflammable material. 

and the idea was to set li^'ht to it. ring the lire-alarm bell, 
and get all the population out on the streets. Rowan was 
head of the Fire Company, and a^ thick- in the plot as any 
one else. Then somebody suggested that the night editor 
of the Herald should write a couple of sticksful. double- 
leaded, condemning the whole thing as a frightful outrage, 
and calling on the Mayor to punish the offenders, and then 
the preparations were complete. Sid Laeey and another 
were to light the bonfire and signal it by tiring their pistols 
in the air. There were no horses for the fire engines in 
those days: everybody pulled on the rope, and a lovely pull 
it was over the sandlots. Jingle-jangle went the fire bells 
as the flames shot up from the pile, which was over twenty 
feet high. Out poured the people, and the engine rope 
was manned in less than a minute. Of course when the 
crowd got down there it was evident that it had been 
fooled, but the boys insisted on playing on the conflagra- 
tion. There was one slight accident when the nozzle flew 
up and cut Aaron Smith, of Smith Brothers, upholsterers, 
on the forehead, but the practical joke brought nearly two 
thousand people out of their beds and was voted an entire 
success. It is, perhaps, noteworthy that at that time 
there was only one little four horse-power Baxter engine 
used in printing newspapers in the city. That was on the 
Los Angeles Herald. The Express and Star were both 
printed on the old-fashioned hand presses. The false alarm 
was repeated once subsequently, but the second time it 

was a dismal failure. 

* # * 

The cheap butcher has come, but not to stay unless he 
alters his methods. An analysis of a roast of beef which 
looked as tempting as the combined heart and stomach of 
man could desire, may prove of interest to the economical 
householder. It was, apparently, a splendid family roast, 
weighed almost eight pounds, and the price was fifty-five 
cents. But this delusive exterior was fastened together 
with seven big wooden skewers, and the interior was com- 
posed of scraps of fat artistically jammed into the middle. 
Of course it would not cook, for when the innocent looking 
outsides were crispy and brown, the middle was a mass of 
seething grease. There are more ways than one of beat- 
ing the devil around a stump, but the cheap meat fraud is 
probably the latest and most ingenious swindle concocted. 
There are dozens of these little roasts always displayed to 
catch the unwary, and they really look so tempting, neatly 
tied up with string, that the purchaser thinks he has a big 
bargain, forgetting the trite, but always useful, maxim, 
that the world is made up of suckers and sports. The 
cheap butcher is a pretty healthy old sport. 

* * * 

The venerable Mark L. McDonald, once a prominent 
figure in San Francisco, came down from his Sonoma home 
to attend a meeting of the State Board of Trade this week. 
He is one of the energetic men of the State, and is ambitious 
in having California well represented at the Atlanta Ex- 
position. McDonald has been prominent in most of the 
public enterprises that have taken shape to expand the re- 
sources of the State and push California to the front. He 
carries his age well, and still possesses the spirit of youth. 
He pledges Sonoma County in the matter of subscribing 
her share to the enterprise, even if he has to go down deep 
into his own pocket, and that he will do if necessary. 

Don't fail to chew Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum after 
meats. Indigestion fades before it. 









the most nol 
I Hi 
th a i»ilisii thai Is of the 
i>e i> worthy thai of an ambaa 
sador, and made quit on at the hotel. The ap- 
parel was gorg - Km ii was puzzling to distinguish 

which were his "nol wivi to! would put it). Ho 

registered several very engaging young Celestial beauties 

ousins," all of which roused great perturbation In the 

of the newspaper men who were standing about in 

awe and wonderment. 

* » # 

An English ship with the Union Jack on a blue field was 
in the harbor of San Francisco last wool,. The significance 
"f this blue field is thai ii means thai the officer in com- 
mand of the ship, and a certain proportion of the crow, 
belong to the Royal Naval Reserve. The plain merchant 
marine Bag is the Union Jack, at one corner, on a red Held ; 
then the Royal Naval Reserve has the Union Jack, also on 
the corner of the Hag, on a blue field, while the Royal Navy 
has the Union Jack, at one corner, but on a white field, 
while St. George's Cross traverses the Hag at right angles 
and in the centre. The lines on this point are sharply 
drawn, and any infringement of the rule is quickly noticed. 
It is, however, unusual to see a merchant ship with the 
blue ensign, although it is common among the large steam- 
ship lines. 

* * * 

At breakfast the other morning Joe Macdonough an- 
nounced his intention of building a cracker jack" sloop 
to contest the winner of the coming International Yacht 
Race. He said that he would await the result before giv- 
ing definite orders, but that he has already had negotia- 
tions with a prominent designer in the East — who, by the 
bye, is not Herreshoff this time. 

* # * 

" A Bridge of Sighs" — our Mayor's nose. 
" Song of The Shirt " — a political anthem. 
"A Leap in The Dark " — police after a clew. 
"Wild, but not woolly" — a bald-beaded roue. 
"High Tides" — recent events at San Quentiu. 
"Toilers of The Sea " — North Beach fishermen. 
"A full assortment " — At the Home for Inebriates. 
"A Comedy of Errors" — local weather predictions. 
"Shadows of a Great City " — our colored population. 
"Ships That Pass " — Five-cent schooners at the bar. 
A Bohemian pastoral — "When the cows come home." 
" A Dream of Fair Women" — the late Senator's amours. 
"A Skeleton in armor " — family trouble at the Presidio. 
' ' Opening of a Chestnut Burr ' ' — encountering a punster. 
What dentists are looking for— A face against the pane. 

EUREKA GARDEN HOSE. " 




Coast. 



Goodyear Rubber Company, 

R. H. Pease, Vice-President and Manager. 
577-579 Market St., S. F. 73-75 First St., Portland, Or 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 




ALL the soldier boys are favorites with the heau sexe at 
Monterey, none more so than the fine-looking, eagle- 
eyed General Forsythe, whose gallantry is proverbial. 
The girls all vie with each other in competing for a seat 
beside him when he drives his showy team, and his two 
charming relatives, the Misses Williams, of San Rafael, 
are especially in favor with those desirous of winning the 
box seat. 

* * * 

Mesdames Requa, Catherwood, and George Crocker 
have been the active principals, so to speak, of the Castle 
Crags gaieties. This trio of matrons work together with 
a will for the pleasure of their friends, and the result has 
been, so far, a more enjoyable season there than ever be- 
fore known in the history of the Tavern. There are so 
many wealthy men among the guests the mothers of mar- 
riageable daughters are as a consequence in love with the 
place; while the husbands with erratic habits find it a 
most desirable spot wherein to deposit their wives when 
"business of a pressing nature" calls them to the city, the 
distance being too great to admit of the spouse taking a 
trip in that direction also, as could easily be done from 
nearer outing places — Mill Valley, for example! 

* * * 

On 'lit Mrs. Will Crocker is an desespoir over the antici- 
pated departure for Chicago of that city's native daughter, 
Mrs. Harriet Pullman Carolan, as the two young matrons 
have become fast friends after beginning their acquaint- 
ance, singularly enough, with a decidedly antipathetic ten- 
dency. Another on ilil goes that the advent on the coast 
of Mrs. George Crocker has been a thorn in the side of the 
ex-Stocktonienne, and another European trip may eventu- 
ate before the winter sets in. 

* * # 

Fashionable circles of the little burgh of San Rafael are 
quite excited over the marriage of William Babcock, the 
handsome widower, and Mrs. Beck, formerly Miss Julia 
May of Baltimore; and gossip is busy over the pros and 
cons of a return to the village of Mr. Babcock and his 
bride. It may be that San Francisco society will be the 
gainer, and once again enroll among its most exclusive set 
the name of Babcock. 

* * * 

The numerous branches of the Howard-Parrott-Dono- 
hoe-Bowie-Hayue connection will muster in large numbers 
at San Mateo in the early part of next month for the nup- 
tials of young Hayne and Miss Babette Howard, the only 
sister of charming Mrs. E. D. Beylard. Every one hopes 
it will be a rural wedding, the locale being so admirably 
adapted for the same. 

* * * 

Naughty Wilcox! Like all "pets," he is capricious, and 
his last admiratiou at Del Monte would lead one to say 
fickle. Castle Crags has evidently faded into a dim 
memory while the witching glance of the Del Monte belle is 
the reigning star in his heaven. 

* * * 

Appearances indicate that the pretty blonde violinist 
has consoled herself for the marriage in New York of her 
erstwhile admirer, by the attentions of another San 
Rafaelite. 

* * # 

Mr. Greenway is more popular than ever this summer, 
owing to his quiet, but charming, entertainments. Invita- 
tions to his luncheons and dinners are not regretted by any 
means. Next Tuesday he will give an elaborate dinner -to 
a number of engaged couples in and about Ross Valley. At 
this especially prepared feast the announcement of two 
new engagements will be made. Those on the inside are 
waiting patiently to see the effect of the surprises. 

* * * 

Miss McCutcheon's coming wedding will be quite the 
event of early fall. Miss Mary Eyre has been chosen maid 
of honor, and the gowns of* the bridal party are to be 
dreams of beauty. 



The Hearst mansion across the bay will once more be the 
scene of countless gaieties, this time to the delight of Mr. 
Macdonough's friends. The lease of Seapoint is a long one, 
so those included on his list will come in for a share of his 
well known hospitality. With a large bank account, a fine 
yacht anchored off shore, hosts of friends, champagne 
galore, the time to come will pass only too rapidly for the 
favored ones. Ned Sheldon, Allen Bowie, Macintosh and 
Claud Terry have with the navy another opponent in the 
battle for fair smiles. 

* # # 

Belvedere continues to be a babble of Babel, and pre- 
sumably will continue so until the Night in Venice is con- 
fined to the dim past. Every one who possesses a roof 
will have their hospitality taxed to the utmost. Even the 
lodging-houses not on the exclusive hill will be patronized. 
All the ark owners are preparing special designs for decor- 
ative lighting, and the air will shriek with brilliancy. 
Harry Houghton's ark will have a band perched on top, 
and the Arthur Pages will wind up the night with a 
german. 

* * * 

Since the unfortunate episode at Ward McAllister's din- 
ner, where Basil Heathcote's remarks about the feminine 
contingent has earned him a lasting reputation for being a 
cad, he has enjoyed the seclusion that his cottage grants. 
What a pity that one member of a family is given the privi- 
lege of annoying all the other kinsfolk. It seems as 
though society should have the power of inflicting another 
punishment upon an offending member besides letting him 
hereafter alone. 

* # * 

Miss McNutt's accident did not prove so serious as was 
first reported. She has returned home to sympathetic 
friends. Her tale is thrilling in the extreme. Miss Helen 
Smith still lies with a broken hip, while Arthur Hayne's 
face is badly scarred, the result of a terrible accident on a 
mountain road near Santa Barbara. It is thought the 
leader shied at a moonbeam, and the other horses, becom- 
ing unmanageable, caused the overturning of the coach. 

* # * 

Of the firm of Newhall Brothers, none is more portly 
than the member who resides in San Rafael. Aside from 
his geniality he has one fault — he will insist on going yacht- 
ing in a silk top-hat. And now, not content with this 
enormity, he is learning to ride the bicycle in this same 
stiff tile, which, by the way, is said to have come to grief 
last Saturday in the Hotel Rafael grounds. 

* * * 

The McDonoughs and the Agars were guests of the 
Slaters Tuesday, on the magnificent steam yacht Eleanor, 
which dropped into port the fore part of the week. 

After dinner try Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gam. You 
will find it admirable. 



Ladies' Purses, card cases, bill boobs and valises are among the 
new tbings in leather goods inst received at S.inborn & Vail's. 

~"Boord's Extra Dry," 

The Finest Dry 
Unsweetened Old TOIH 
Gin, Imported from 



Boord's 



Sole Agents. 



BOOrd & SOn, London, Eng. 

Also Shippers of 

fOld Tom Gin 

Orange Bitters 

Irish Malt Whiskey 

Scotch Whiskey, and 
(Pale Sherry. 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

314 Sacramento St., 8. F. 



July j;. 1895. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'3 



MARCIA. 



SI I F. was .. 
Into her eye* the light of 1 
ml been whispering t.. t en 
life would take her own. Hut th 

ami Bhe was still alive, glu 



s had struggled 'jack, . 
■therfaood For months 
f that the joy of giving 
daughter had come, 
for through the 



she could bear a tin} \,>t all the sounds 

u> which Bhe had ever listened I ad bo thrilled her. Bappy 
tears slid down her whit!' cheeks, and her frail hands were 
ssed hard over her heart, while into the silence she 
whispered her baby's nam.' Helen, mother's name," Bhe 
said, and then a prayer. Then she slipped hark into un- 

iousness; but, through it all. her arms were folded 
protectingly over her breast and she feebly crooned a baby 
song. 

The stamping of her husband's feet in the adjoining 
room was the sound she next recognised. She knew it was 
five o'clock, and that he had just i-ome in from bedding 
down the eattle. Then that little erv again: at last she 
lived! at last! What mattered dow her whole miserable 
past? Then came B great self-pity for what it had always 

been up t<> this hour. 

She could not recollect her mother's face; she remem- 
bered her father as a hard old man who resented her sex 
and her weakness; her brothers she always thought of as 
scowling, thick -limbed men in butchers' frocks. She seemed 
to see herself again fleeing from one of them, who finally 
caught and bound her to the well curb, where he compelled 
her to witness the killing of hogs. Their coarse laughter 
and ridicule! she could hear it still. 

The awful loneliness of the big, brown farmhouse; she 
had strained her eyes whole days to catch a glimpse of a 
chance passer on the main road. The hunger she had felt 
for the sight of a woman's face. How she had prayed that 
her father might marry again — any one, even old Nance, 
who used to travel about the country doing tailoring for 
the farmers. 

Then those last years — anything would have been wel- 
comed. That last day, when one of her brothers enter- 
tained his drunken companions by dropping a snake down 
the neck of her frock; the cheers from the men, the cold 
touch of the writhing green creature against her quivering 
flesh — twenty years had not brought forgetfulness. Then 
her rescue from her brother by Jared. Her flight that 
night with him, her marriage, and swift recognition of the 
fact that number does not count if one's life must be passed 
with brutes. 

Jared's home, another lonely farmhouse, not a woman 
within miles; in her whole life she had never really known 
one. Ten lonely years, hope had died. Then came that 
mother thrill; life held something for her. She remem- 
bered how she had stopped turning the great churn and 
dropped on her knees in the wetcellar. "O God! if mother 
were only alive; if I could tell her." 

How she went to Jared with her blessed secret, of the 
black, angry blood that jumped into his face; how he had 
hoped " t' God 'twill be a boy jest to spite ye." 

But her faith was perfect. God had remembered her. 
The little one was to be her companion. 

Then those months of happiness, months when nothing 
mattered; the drudgery became beautiful, and she would 
straighten her bent shoulders for a moment and press her 
toil-worn fingers against her temples to temper the happi- 
ness which was throbbing there. 

And now it was passed— that little cry made it certain. 
" Just to reach this moment and I would live it all over 
again, all." The "to-night" had come after which she 
would be no more lonely. 

But the baby which Marcia had prayed she might call 
by her mother's name was a boy, and Jared decided to 
call him Tim. " None of yer fancy handles for me, old 
woman," he said to her. Marcia cried a little, and her 
voice dwelt and broke over that other name. 

Wistfully Marcia watched over little Tim, and, when his 
baby mouth began to coarsen and his narrow eyes looked 
back at her cold and bard, something like despair came 
into her face. 

"Put a butcher's frock on him and ye'll have the ole 
man an' yer bloomin' brothers biled down," said Jared to 
her. She shivered, and the little hand she was fondling 
struck at her. 



Other coarsc-hni red. thick- limbed babies came t" the 
Klkins household unti (when Tim was ten years old) there 

Somewhere in the parrel Marcia had treasured a book 
in which she had read of the comfort thai children brought 
to the mother whose life was loveless. 

Bhe do longer stole up the stairs to read it. 

There came a winter when Marcia could not turn the 
churn, and after a little she did aol leave her bed. When 

she was dying Bhe asked for the basket of baby linen 

mark. and died quite bravely, holding the little 

yellow garments close to her bosom. 

—Adelaide Lund, in Vogue. 



Starved to Death 
in miilst of plenty. Unfortunate, yet we hear of it. The Gail Ilor- 
den Eagle Brand Condensed Milk is undoubtedly the safest and 
best infant rood, fnfant Health is a valuable pamphlet for mothers. 
Semi your address to the New York Condensed Milk Company, New 
York. 



Bibles, Prayer Books and Hymnals in Stationery department, 
Sanborn. Vail .v. Co.. 741 Market street. 



NEW YORK. 



LONDON. 



The HARASZTHY 



CHAMPAGNE. 



BRUT, The Clubman's Wine 
CARTE BLANCHE, Society's favorite 
ECLIPSE, Extra Dry, The Convivial 



PHILADELPHIA. 



ARPAD HARASZTHY, 

G rower. 



CHICAGO. 



SOMEWHERE TO DINE. 

There's many a man, saint or sinner — 

Who knows not the right place to" go 
In search of a lunch or a dinner, 

Not too dear, hut yet served cemme il Jaut. 
Now here's the address— read and mark it — 

Where the choice of the best is at hand. 
Stalls 68 and 70. California Market— 

Moraghan's Oyster Stand. 

There's no need to look far for the reason 

Why the patronage pays in the pelf, 
For they serve all the good things in season, 

And the boss runs the business himself. 
And the delicate, succulent oyster 

Is ever in greatest demand 
In that pleasant, convenient cloister 

Moraghan's Oyster Stand. 

" Californians " or "Easterns," they all are 

Put up in the daintiest style. 
And It's very well spent is a dollar 

In sampling these bivalves a while; 
For the epicure ne'er finds an oyster 

In any lay-out in the land 
That tempts him to revel and royster 

Like Moraghan's Oyster Stand. 




fl. D. 1900 

Will have retired 
allot the "lift and 
peek" typewriting 
machines. 

The Williams is the first 
standard typewriter to adopt 
visible writing. Writes in 
plain sight. Does not use 
ribbons. Quickest learned. 
Easiest operated. Does the 
finest work yet done by a 
machine. Proof at the Pacific 
Coast Agency. 



Pacific States Type Foundry. 

I The News Letter's new dress was cast by Pacific States Type Foundry 



409 Washington St., 

San Francisco 



H 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 




California Before many months have passed every 
Gold Mines, one with a dollar at his or her command in 
this city will be reaching out for an in- 
ter 1st in a California gold mine. The fever is very catch- 
ing and it is developing every day. A review of mining in 
this State from its earliest days by any one fairly ac- 
quainted with the situation then and now in the different 
districts, must result in a realization of the fact that very 
little of the mineral wealth has yet been developed. The 
gold of the past has mainly come from surface deposits, 
where gold could be taken out with a little exertion by the 
crude means at the command of the miner. The prolific 
quartz mines which have been worked to any depth as yet 
are few and far between. A large amount of the gold ac- 
credited to the total output of a term of years came also 
from hydraulic mining operations among the auriferous 
gravels, and by drifting at depth in the channels of ancient 
rivers buried for centuries under lava capped mountains. 
But when it comes to the original source of all the wealth of 
gold, the veins of quartz in place, how little actual work- 
can be pointed out? It is well known that valuable de- 
posits of this fertile quartz are to be found all over the 
State. An elder generation was well aware of this, and 
from it descends the legends about the fabulous wealth 
of this mine or that, within the several regions. These 
mines were carried down as a rule to the point where 
water interfered with operations, when they passed into 
history with their tales of the untold wealth which had ac- 
crued to their lucky owners. These are the mines to which 
the wise investor has recently turned in search of for- 
tune which has invariably attended the introduction of 
modern ideas and inventions in the way of machinery. 

Home Enterprise Outside of these mines, first opened by 
Is Favored. the ancients — the worthy forefathers 

of the California commonwealth — how 
many quartz properties have been systematically devel- 
oped all over the State? Notable mines of this description 
can almost be enumerated upon the fingers. Admitted 
that the bulk of our wealth in gold is contained in the vast 
quartz deposits, how little attention has been paid to their 
exploitation, compared with that which has been extended 
toward gravel and placer mines. It is here that a new 
and wide field is opening up for the investment of home 
capital. With such examples in the way of wealth pro- 
ducers as the Utica, the Rawhide, and the Kennedy, it 
will not be long until systematic work is begun on hun- 
dreds of well known ledges which have been awaiting the 
introduction of capital for years past. The magic power 
of a few bars of gold bullion will unlock the coffers of 
hoarded wealth all over the States. The East will recog- 
nize that it has a South Africa of its own at home here, 
which will better pay to develop than to chance the foreign 
bait in Wall street, where already there is talk of intro- 
ducing shares of stock floated across the Atlantic. Charity 
begins at home, and prudence itself should suggest the ad- 
visability of avoiding foreign gamblers for the reliable in- 
terest paying investments in the Golden State. The dis- 
position on the part of Eastern capitalists to open up our 
mines was never more apparent than it is to-day. It will 
be to our own interest to protect these people from the 
wiles of the unscrupulous individual who will sooner or 
later appear upon the scene. 

Stump's The New York World is not treating Mr. 

Unfriendly Stump kindly in ridiculing his mining propo- 
Critics. sition. Mr. Stump's ideas are working in 
the right groove, and while desirous of en- 
couraging mining in California, he is also anxious to pre- 
vent investors being swindled. The Worldis a little touchy. 
perhaps, for the reason that most of the swindlers on this 
coast hail from New York. Mr. Stump has been unhappy, 
perhaps, in his remarks about this class of objectionables. 
He lias evidently gored somebody's ox. 

COLONEL J. B. Low, the well known Mining Engineer, 
who has just returned from a professional visit to 
Plumas County, speaks very highly of the prospects in that 
section of the State. 



Comstock Business has been as dull as may be expected 
Mining at this season of the year, when every one 
Shares. with a dollar to spare drops out of town for a 
breathing spell. Here and elsewhere in the 
speculative marts of the world midsummer is looked upon 
as a season when trading can be safely left to the street, 
for the benefit of the rank and file. It is rare that this 
city ever affords an exception to the rule. High prices 
have seldom ruled at this period of the year, and the small 
fry have little to do but play the game on a five-cent limit. 
A great many expected to see a regular whoop- up the day 
after the Fourth, and a few of the deeply interested never 
even overlooked the holiday preceding, holding sessions on 
the street like children playing house — another exhibition 
of the power of the " ruling passion " over weak humanity. 
But even this mild enthusiasm did not awake the echoes 
on the appointed date, and the columns of news from the 
Brunswick have only fallen flat to remain so until the men 
at the back of the movement are ready to move the shares 
on capital. Wind alone can not be looked for now to in- 
flate the spreading sails of the new argosy, on which the 
hopes of so many would-be wealthy folks are now so re- 
ligiously inclined. That a market will come sooner or later 
is a pleasure to anticipate. Everything favors the pro- 
ject, when the Hour and the Man is at hand. 

Irrigation Editorial comment upon the Ross opinion of 
Bond the Wright law is another instance of locking 

Holders, the stable after the horse is stolen. It is, 
however, in conformity with custom to ignore 
the true meaning and intent of new laws until some sapient 
big-wig pokes his finger through them. Then the howl 
which arises is unanimous, but, in the. meantime, every un- 
fortunate who has been offered a chance to lose his money 
has been trapped, and all the damage possible has been 
done. So long as the pot-house politican is permitted to 
appoint the men who make laws for decent people, just so 
long will it be unsafe for the investor to put his money 
into the schemes which they undertake to regulate, until 
a final Court of Appeal has been reached and the Justices 
have reversed themselves to a finish. It is deemed proper 
just now, in conjunction with the able critiques on the de- 
cision, to lament the heavy losses of the foreign bond in- 
vestors. This is quite unnecessary in this case, as the 
crape is hanging on our own front door. The rod was cut 
and pickled for the backs of monied people here, and un- 
fortunately, in the majority of cases, for people who least 
deserve to suffer. It is calculated by those acquainted with 
the situation that about $5,000,000 in bonds are held here 
against $400,000 in Great Britain and on the continent, the 
latter being salted more heavily. The light sales abroad 
can be ascribed to the fact that most of the lawyers here 
representing foreign capital were afraid of the law, and 
refused to pass upon the loans. It follows, then, that 
tears should be shed for the neighbor instead of the 
stranger without our gates. 

The Utica's It is a subject for congratulation that 
Narrow Escape, the fire in the Utica mine was checked 
before it reached any serious propor- 
tions. There is every reason to believe that the news of 
the disaster has been greatly exaggerated, and that work 
will be resumed at a much earlier period than the press 
dispatches announce. The mine is well equipped with 
pumps, and a fortnight or three weeks should see it at 
work again, if everything goes all right. As it was the 
owners had a narrow escape from a very heavy loss of both 
time and money. 

New York Wall street securities during the past week- 
Stock have been quite active, scoring a good advance 
Market. both in the Industrial and Railway list. The 
bond market shows considerable improve- 
ment. London has purchased American securities liberally 
for the past ten days, St. Paul being the favorite which is 
tipped for a good advance. Burlington and Rock Island 
have been strong on the corn prospects, which at present 
promises the largest crop ever known. Damage to spring 
wheat has kept St. Paul and North West from making 
over an ordinary improvement. New England, the rubber 
ball of the Stock Exchange, has advanced to 55 on rumors 
of its purchase by the Harlem road. The Industrial list 
was led by Sugar, which touched 1141. against 106J last 
week. Chicago Gas advanced to 58 from 50. 



Juh 



SAN FRANC I i ll< 



IS 




"Hear Ibe Crier!" \v» .- ■ ii<rtl an tbour 
•One ibal wlllplar IbaoWTtl, «ir. wlttarou " 



THE Rei Mr Mathena, Presbyterian, expressed his 
■t the other dav, in the presence of his assembled 
al brethren, that tin 1 fare to the ocean beach la not 
one dollar, a> it used to l«-. instead of five cents. Brother 
llathena's desire in this regard is due to the fact that when 
the far,' was high, people came to church who now. when the 
ar,' is low, go t.> tho beach, thus not only breaking the Sab- 
bath, but reducing the amount of the collections. Noclergy- 
man at the meeting t,x>k exception to the judicious remarks 
of Brother Mathena, which may. therefore, be accepted as 
the sense of the body. The situation calls for radical 
action. Prayers for the removal of the Pacific Ocean 
would be timely, or. failing that, deterring smash-ups each 
Sunday on the godless railroads. And while the brethren 
are offering their petitions for the good of the cause, the 
worldly, who prefer the airy beach to the stuffy pew, 
might organize a counter movement for the removal, by 
Heaven's favor, of Pastor Mathena and his brethren to 
some star where the hearing- of preaching is so much liked 
that no other amusement is eared for. The suspicion can- 
not but force itself upon the carnal mind that when the 
Almighty created this particular planet he did not design 
that it should be peopled by Presbyterians exclusively. 

COOK, the San Francisco Police Court clerk, who has 
served two of his eight years' sentence for embezzle- 
ment, thinks he ought to be pardoned, or, failing pardon, 
that his sentence should be commuted. His reason for so 
thinking is that he has acquired the asthma. Lambert, 
the embezzling Police Court clerk of Oakland, has not yet 
served a month of bis seven years, but he is doubtless much 
interested in his colleague's petition, and is prepared, on 
proper inducements, to fall into consumption. The state 
of Mr. Chris. Evans's health has not yet been made public. 
Governor Budd is something of an invalid himself, but if he 
shall let Cook, or any other justly convicted thief, out of 
the penitentiary, the number of those who will wish an in- 
crease of his rheumatism will be swollen. 

PRESIDENT Cleveland writes to a friend that his mar- 
ried life has been "one grand, sweet song." That is 
a man all over — utterly selfish. He is not ashamed to keep 
Mrs. Cleveland to himself instead of letting her, as the 
Rev. Anna Shaw could tell him he ought to do, go about 
doing good on the lecture platform and in congresses for 
the uplifting of her oppressed sex. "What with attending 
to her husband's comfort, and having babies, and looking 
after her home, Mrs. Cleveland has been given no chance 
whatever to distinguish herself in any rational way. She 
is only a good wife and mother, and a charming woman, 
whereas she might, but for her sordid cares, have emulated 
example and made a historic name for herself as a nuisance. 

WHEN eight of the Supervisors have been sent to jail 
for life, and Mayor Sutro, by and with the advice and 
consent of the Call, has filled their places, the Octopus will 
have to climb its highest trolley pole and hang on hard 
with all its tentacles if it cares for fresh air and continued 
existence. Were it not for a free, virtuous, and disinter- 
ested press, this terrified community would be given over 
to the unrestrained license of the well-known firm of Mam- 
mon & Gammon. 
IT was not Warden Hale who put upon Governor Budd 
the insupportable affront of expressing to his Excellency 
a San Quentin jute-bag, with an accompanying written 
request (in a carefully disguised hand) that the executive 
head be placed therein. Dr. Levingston turns over, after 
having been turned down, to say that neither is he respon- 
sible for the outrage. The clouds of suspicion are slowly 
gathering around Gavin McNab. 

ftN Oakland barber, having been horsewhipped by his 
wife, informs the press that she is no better than 
she should be. It doesn't matter. Whatever the lady's 
character may be, a public service such as hers more than 
rehabilitates her. All the virtues must not be looked for 
in benefactors of the race. 



Til E jun i a ted well 

at tin- \ .11 have hied them- 

if the ytbing, A 

Springs finds the fiddler "an 
amiable gentleman," the man who sells sardines and 
chee» 1, in bis way.'' and "our genial 

English friend The host is excellent, his wife lovely, and 

the proprietress "mother to all the people'' with "a 7'Jml 
birthday and ., lovely charai ter." Here is more English: 
"There is a fine tennis court and l/> anderitood) many good 
players." This ought to be good for another month there 
nexl season. It is further noted that "everybody chews 
gum.' To make the thing complete she should have said 
Tutti Prutti gum, 

^ LAMBDA is to have ;m out-and-out living-picture ex- 
hibition in which a hundred or more young society 
ladies are to take part. Alameda is in every sense the 
proper place to hold one of these popular and artistic en- 
tertainments, because, firstly, it is a summer paradise, 
and in the original garden of Eden no tailors or dress- 
makers were allowed. Secondly, Alameda is our great 
bathing place, and its inhabitants are so accustomed to 
gazing on sylphs in bathing costumes that they are inured 
to scant raiment and not the faintest tinge of a sense of 
immodesty can lay a suspicion of a blush on the coming 
festival. Thirdly, the clergy all approve of it, for the 
shekels go that way. 

THE advertisement for a Christian dentist to 1 go to 
Oakland, which has appeared regularly of late in a 
morning paper, is a terrible reflection on the tooth-pullers 
of that hamlet. It is bad enough to have a man yanking 
at your jaw for two or three hours while you lay back in 
dumb agony and listen to his professional gossip, but a 
dentist who would inject a verse from the Psalms whilst he 
is jamming gold into a cavity with a miniature mallet,, 
would turn the most pious Christian into a raving atheist. 
Dr. Younger ought to look into the matter and see that 
any one who pretends to be a Christian odontologist be in- 
continently fired out of the profession. 

SETER many months of toil and sleepless nights, Will 
Ash, whose athletic form was always seen following 
in the wake of Governor Budd, has secured a plum. He 
aimed high in the outset, following the election, contesting 
for the Registrar of Voters with Hinton, and Commissioner 
of Public Works with Ed. Leek. He thought he deserved 
any position for arduous services rendered. He had 
watched the count in this city while asleep in his chair, and 
was a zealous worker at the polls. He is booked for Chief 
Wharfinger, and his manly form will not be seen guarding 
his Excellency in the future, provided always that his ap- 
pointment is confirmed. 

AS yet Pope Leo XIII. has not intervened in the Exami- 
ner's behalf to- save it from punishment for having 
danced on the Declaration of Independence and scoffed 
joyously at the Fourth of July. The dread fear is growing 
in the Examiner office that the Pope has been tampered 
with by the A. P. A. — indeed, that his Holiness may even 
have gone so far as to join a lodge of that dark and mid- 
night order. 

FASTOR Gibson, of whose flock Brother Durrant is one, 
observed from the pulpit on Sunday last that the 
Savior also advertised. Other points of resemblance will 
doubtless reward search made with modesty and good taste. 
In the end the Gibson will dramatize himself. He has 
tasted of the blood of notoriety, and can never again be 
satisfied with the pale- delights of a placid imbecility. 

SHOLTO was regarded as fair game when he first 
made his appearance in this part of the- world. A 

more harmless-appearing youth could scarcely be found. 

But even the worm will turn. Now that this scion of 

British aristocracy has married into one of our American 

families of " git, " he has plucked up courage and figures 

conspicuously in a libel suit. 

■pj- ASTERN girls having taken to dancing in their bloom- 

\j ers, many old-fashioned people are shocked. What 

would the old-fashioned have 1 Do they expect girls to 

dance without their bloomers ? 

SINCE assiduous bicycling develops a calf like a beer^ 
keg, the most sanguine is not permitted to hope that 
the bloomer will ever go out of fashion. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 







IN his last book on the "Messiah of the Apostles," the 
Rev. C. A. Briggs continues, as he tells us, to try and 
urn away from the Christ of the theologians and the creeds 
of the church, and see the Messiah as He is set forth in the 
writings of each of the Apostles; as He appeared to each 
writer in each separate writing. Apart from theological 
criticism the book has the fault of being over-dressed. The 
Rev. Mr. Briggs uses too many learned words, and while 
we admit that the book is a learned thesis in its way. yet 
it is a pity that those who write about Him cannot follow 
His example of simplicity. 

William Waldorf Astor has succeeded in making the 
Pall Mall Magazine the best illustrated magazine in Eng- 
land, and that, too. beyond all comparison. Indeed, we do 
not know any other magazine in the world that surpasses 
it in the richness of coloring and delicacy of tone which 
marks some of its pictures. There are 121 illustrations on 
the 17lj pages in the number for July, but those taken 
from the water colors, "When Leaves Were Green," give 
tin- number a distinctive feature not possessed by any 
other magazine in Great Britain. 

Women are now admitted to all — or nearly all — Univer- 
sity examinations at Oxford. But this does not make 
them members of the University nor does it entitle them to 
be admitted as B. A. or M. A. But now they are asking 
for the B. A. degree, to which request the Fortnightly 
Review is bitterly opposed, arguing that once they are ad- 
mitted to the B. A. they must necessarily be admitted to 
the M. A., then to have votes, and finally to the University 
itself. 

"The Tragical History of Our Late Brother Robert, 
Earl of Essex," purports to be "deciphered from the 
works of Sir Fran.. is Bacon." The book has reference to 
the rebellion of the Earl of Essex, and a poorer production 
s not often issued from the press. It is a jumble, chaotic, 
ami is full of pilfering from cover to cover. It is a hotch- 
potch, and if the author, Orville W. Owen, is of sound 
mind, we are sorry for him. 

"Melting Snows," by Prince Schoenarch-Garolath, and 
translated by Margaret Symonds, is a story of simple ele- 
ments, homely in plot, weak in dialogue, and whose only 
charm is that it is written for the masses. It is a book of 
natural and small ideas, and one that is calculated to 
please a people who are not as mentally active as English- 
men or Americans. Whatever merit it has is in its sim- 
plicity. 

"The Plays of Maurice Maeterlinck. Princess Maleine, 
the Intruder. The Blind. The Seven Princesses." trans- 
lated by Richard Hovey, is a work full of platitudes, and a 
nightmare. Mr. Maeterlinck was never popular, and one 
of his literary sponsors once called him "the poet of the 
sepulchre." His works are comical, but that is something 
that Maurice Maeterlinck does not know, hence the fun. 

The last book written by John Oliver Hobbs. the brilliant 
American lady whose divorce proceedings have attracted 
so much attention, is the best of all her works because the 
longest. It is called "The Gods, Some Mortals, and Lord 
Wickenham." Her wonderful genius for condensation is 
such that English men of letters are now asking her to 
write a comedy. 

"The Heritage of the Kurts," by Bjornson, is not a new 
novel, as the casual reader might suppose. It is simply 
an old book under a new name. We read it years ago 
when it was published under the title of "Flags a'-flying in 
Town and Harbor." However, it is an excellent story, 
and only second to Bjornson's great story, "In God's 
Way." 

"Ernest England; oraSoul Laid Bare," is a story thatis 
not worth telling. Its disquisitions are tumid, its morality 
trite, its ethics weak, and. despite the author's occasional 
facility for versification, his book is — wind. The author 
calls his book "A Drama for the Closet." What does he 
mean? 



Mr. David Christie Murray's new novel, "The Martyred 
Fool," is not a literary success. Indeed, it appears to us 
that Mr. Murray cares more about sustaining the interest 
of the reader to the end than literary style, and if so, then 
' ' The Martyred Fool " realizes his expectations. And when 
we say this new novel is not a success we mean that it is 
not up to the standard of his old-time novels, which made 
him so popular during the days of Charles Reade, Wilkie 
Collins, and other minor masters of fiction. 

In Once a Week for July 25th General J. S. Mosby tells 
one of the most striking episodes of his adventurous career. 
It was his raid in North Virginia, in which he captured 
and carried off General E. H. Stoughton and other officers. 
This will be of great interest to all veterans of the war. 



.-ilSrACTION DERJVE.D FROM 
kW 1 V ^ T.^SfAOKlHG 
X 1 YALE 
& MATURE. 

' DIFFICULT 
- J- OF 
DE.icRJPTiOrl 




PF-LIGHTFUL 
i, BLEND 
ONCE. 
TriE^- 
R.E5JLT 
WILL 



I 2 OZ. TRIAL PACKAGE 
, POSTPAID FOR25ciHlS 

MARBURG MQSl^XW E *S!S?" 



Snell Seminary. 



The Fall Term will open 
August 5. 18S)5. at 

e^The Itterritt Place, 

Corner Fourteenth and Madison streets, Oakland, Cal , the 
residence of the late Dr. Samuel Merritt. 



Pupils prepared for admission to any of the Universities. A 
fine corps of teachers for Advanced, Intermediate and Kinder- 
garten Departments. Send for catalogue. 



Mary E. Snell, Principal. 



1849 Jackson St 



Van Ness Youno 
Uadies Seminary 



San Francisco 



Under the ownership and direction of S. H. WILLEY, aided by a corps o 
twelve teachers. Numbers in the family limited to twenty-five. 

Next Term Opens August 1st. 



SgHooI For Boys, 



The school opens for hoarding 
and day scholars on 
AUGUST 1, 1835. 



1012 Grand Street, near San Jose Avenue, 

ALAMEDA, Cal 



W. de JUNG, Principal. 



Miss Manson's Scnool, 

1625 San Jose Ave., between 
Grand and Paru streets, 

Alameda, Gal. 

Boarding and day school lor girls Next term begins Monday, August 5th 



Mills College and Seminary.^ 



Mills College P O. 



Next term begins August 7, 1895 

Write for Catalogue to 

MRS. C. T. MILLS, President. 

Alameda County, Cal, 



July rj, 1895. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



A BOOK OF THE WEEK.* 



I'' • - well known 
at oft-quot< What will Mrs. 

ed with Hippanl expi If our 

memory I n us to forget with, we think we 

' then- in years gone by, and we know it came back 
- like something taken from the treasure-house o( the 
mind, when we read " Reform, by Colonel Ralph De Clair- 
mont. of this city, and we know, too, that we kepi repeat- 
ing the words, 'What will Mi- Grundy Bay?" after we 
bad closed the book. But the Mi-. Grundy our imagina- 
tion stooped to trace is not the Mrs. Grundy of Morton's 
blemished fancy, for our " lady of the Inquiring mind" is 
the Mrs. Grundy of Law and Just'u • . Legislation, the Press, 
Education, Religion, Pinai al Government, Army, 

and in fact everything that affects the social, political, and 
pus world around us. and about which Colonel De 
iiiont boldly expresses his emphasised opinions with a 
firmness which reminds us of the /v., QtntUmen of 1 '. ,-.,,,,, 
— "For what I will. I will, and there an end." And if we 
pause, hesitatingly, over the brown boards of the closed 
book before us. almost fearing to express an opinion on the 
many jrreat subjects involved" in this work, it is only lie- 
cause we wish to be more reverent than plausible, more 
advised than confident, and hoping for more of Heaven's 
first-born — "Light, holy Light'' — upon the subjects 
treated. It is given to so few men in this world to be able 
to condense into 230 pages the evils by which we are sur- 
rounded and to show the "dangers, defects, and remedies" 
of the age in which we live, that we were at first disposed 
to treat Colonel De Clairmont's book with Quixotic gal- 
lantry, but as we proceeded, page by page, we found some- 
thing for serious reflection more than for laughter, and we, 
who opened the book to scoff, remained to pray that some, 
at least, of the "remedies" proposed would yet find a 
place on the statute books of the State and nation, while 
others would be accepted as the social order of the hour. 
To agree with all Colonel De Clairmont says would be im- 
possible. In nine chapters the author makes over seventy 
suggestions for reform in the future, and these suggestions 
cover every conceivable, or nearly conceivable, idea in the 
living life about us, and one has to picture a future in which 
"vice" would no longer "hunt decorum down" to imagine 
the social purity of the world to which Colonel De Clair- 
mont would,- he believes, lead us if he could only have his 
way. And yet, among all those suggestions there are 
many which, if they could be carried out, would "lift 
affliction from the bending form of sorrow," and make the 
world a better world for us all. 

Colonel De Clairmont would treat criminals with stern 
severity; he would make judicial positions permanent dur- 
ing good behavior; he would expel obnoxious foreigners; 
make elections pure; regulate the liquor traffic; suppress 
prize fighting; reduce to the thirteen original stars in the 
national banner; cremate the dead; regulate the dress of 
men and women, and so on through along list of measures, 
contentious, and non-contentious, which make up over 
seventy suggestions for reform — a programme so vast 
that, to us, it looks appalling. Reform comes slowly — too 
slowly, we know. Hei'e in the West it too often comes to 
us as if weighted with the Oregon boot. There is first the 
idea, then years of agitation, then the political wire-pull- 
ing, and then, perhaps, some measure of success. There 
is, however, one noticeable fact in all this s truggle towards 
a purer administration of the laws, and that is that public 
opinion is, and always must be, ahead of the mere politi- 
cian, and we know of no better way to quicken this healthy, 
and necessary, state of affairs than such books as that now 
before us. Even those points on which the reader will 
disagree with tie author are suggestive, for everything in 
the book is suggestive, not excepting what we regard 
as impracticable. But better think even in error than 
not think at all and what we regard as the errors of Col- 
onel De Clairmont are, at least, thoughtful and well-con- 
sidered, issues on which men naturally disagree. But, 
take it all in all, "Reform" will do good. It bears the 
evidence of earnestness on every page. It is carefully com- 
piled and thoughtful. It cultivates concentration, and that 
is one of the most valuable gifts of intellectual attainments 
It is not a book that the devourer of paper-back novels 



would like, but it is ;, l„,,'„ 1, t„ think, anil 

there i> nothing etei • . . ; ,, n d thought. " Reform 

oin to have iti 1 nry merit, hut this is an 
with which we rnnni [ree. The 

is fuli of research, its arguments are well sustained, its 

reasoning close; and, if we cannot agree with its pro 

gramme in its entirety, we can at least express il"' belief 
that Colonel De Clairmont has given us .\ <. Idition 

t<> the work- already published on the social, political, 
financial, educational, and other grave questions of the 

day. It is a |„„,k for the student of BOCiology, for t he 

financier, for the educationalist, for the journalist, ami tor 
the believer in the " dismal science " of political econo 

You cannot hut disagree will, some things it contains, but 
you cannot but think that much of it, is well and wisely 

said. 



•" Reform "-An KsKiiy on tin- Political. Financial. Ill nan inn 

or tbo United States, sin. g. 1 Re lies UyCol- 

ouel Kaipn DeClnlrmoiii To be had at F W. Uarlthaus, lloolislall, -JI3 
K.Mrnv street. Price, $1 511 

AH our new frames have ornamented corners. Old patterns at 25 
per cent, discount. Same rule applies to Framed Pictures. San- 
born, Vail * Co., 741 Market street. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 
children while teething. 

I have purchased the entire interest of Mr. 
Paul Oestiug, in the former firm of Joy & Oest- 
ing, Mr. Oesting retiring. The firm name 
hereafter will be Ed Will W. JOIJ. 




Baldwin Pharmacy 



Corner Market and Powell Sts. 
' San Francisco. 



The Banjo. 

flshton P. Stevens, 

STUDIO: 26 Montgomery street, 
Room 8. Pupils prepared for Stage, 
Concert, or Drawing Room. A Special 
Class for 
teachers who wish to perfect themselves in the Banjo's harmony and teohnic 



Office: Corner Grant ave. and 
Geary St., over "City of Paris. n 
Entrance 14 Grant avenue. 



Hours : 



9:30 am to 12 m 
2 to 4, 7 to 8 p m 



A. G. DEARDORFF, M. D. 

Residence: Baldwin Hotel. Telephone 5400. San Francisco, Cal. 

CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

CANDIES. 
CANDIES.— Don't leave the city without a box of ROBERTS' Best. 

DENTISTS. 
R. Cutlar, 4J2V4 Post street. 

DRUGGISTS. 
Evans's Poison Oak Specific. Positive cure. Sold by all druggists. 

RESTAURANTS. 
Franco-American Restaurant, 521 Montgomery street. F. Hitte. 



VOCAL CULTURE. 
Miss Caroline Shlndler, Soprano. Vocal Culture. Hours, 1 to 3, 2416 Clay 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 

Selections on approval; any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 

The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105O'Farrell St., S. F. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 




I^HE number of accidents and of bad results following 
long continued bicycle rides, which generally go under 
the name of century runs, is this year very large, doubtless 
owing to the increased number of new riders. There is 
too much fast running 011 our roads. Too many young 
men ride, not for the incidental pleasures of the sport, the 
scenery, the pure air, the coolness, the adventures by the 
way, the swim in the secluded pond, the lunch at a hostelry, 
the long loaf on the grass in the shade of willows and all 
the other attractions of an outing, but for the mere exer- 
cise and the desire to outdo some other owner of a wheel. 
They bend over their handle bars, head down, seeing only 
the dust beneath them, and pump away incessantly, often 
puffing and sweating in a way that they would think most 
injurious if it were incidental to the weeding of corn and 
the sawing of wood. The result caruiot but be injurious 
where physical strength is taxed steadily or fitfully, be- 
yond the normal power of the individual to put it forth. 

" Sweater " is the name of the big, clumsy looking gar- 
ment that men wear in athletic field sports, rowing and 
bicycle riding. It is not a pretty article of clothing, and 
it certainly is not attractively named, but there are 
"sweaters " feminine this season, and very fetching they 
look when worn by the right sort of girls. The young 
woman with too redundant " curves " and an over-supply 
of pulchritudinous charm may not affect the "sweater " to 
advautage. Its material is like that of the "jersey" 
waist of several seasons ago, and it accentuates every 
line of the figure. Lithe, willowy, Brown-Pottery girls, 
with slim waists, broad shoulders and " style, " can don 
their sweaters for the morning sail or for a bicycle spin 
before breakfast. On the deck of a yacht they look es- 
pecially appropriate, and offer an unlimited opportunity 
for the posing that the dog-day girl is so fond of. 

There is ample ground for a profusion of adjectives in 
describing the new sweaters, which are both domestic and 
imported. The domestic are all wool, coarse ribbed, and 
are shown in all fashionable shades, and have the leg-of- 
mutton sleeves. The disappearance of the former straight 
sleeve has removed all objections and secured for the 
sweater a boundless popularity. Although similar to the 
domestic in colors, the imported sweaters differ from them 
in being of a fine, fancy stitch, with full puffed sleeves 
reaching to the elbow, below which it fits closely to the 
arm. It is open on both shoulders and fastens with white 
pearl buttons. It is safe to predict that the sweater will 
be much worn this season. 

The saddle for women riders 011 the bicycle should be 
carefully studied, for every woman has to decide for her- 
self what is the most comfortable position and what the 
most comfortable seat. The saddle should be short and 
wide, and the angle experimented with until it becomes 
perfectly satisfactory. At the same time, an endeavor 
should be made to bring all the pressure possible on the 
pedals, so that the weight of your body is distributed and 
comes partly on the seat and partly on the pedals. As re- 
gards the position itself, the body should be as nearly up- 
right as possible. From the waist up you should lean 
neither forward nor backward, but sit upright, as an\ one 
would in an ordinary chair. 

In conversation with Zimmerman at Asbury Park he 
stated to a correspondent of Cycling West positively that 
he had ridden his last race. He goes abroad this 'week, 
but it will only be for exhibition races, and on a trip of re- 
creation. It is known that his wife's folks are greatly op- 
posed to his racing, and the great rider has decided to 
rest on his past glory. This he can easily do, as his ap- 
pearance before a grand stand now is sufficient to draw a 
big crowd, without ever competing in a race. 

A Fin De Siecle Etching.— Four bicyclists, three men 
and one woman in bloomers, coming down street. At end 
of street, a saloon; the four stand before swinging doors; 
three men go inside; woman and four cycles wait outside; 
time. 6:30; place, Sutter and Larkin. 



western Premier cycle go. 

(INCORPORATED ) SAN FRANCISCO 

DIRECTORS: Samuel W. Backus, President; Edward P. Slosson, Sec" 
retary; L. R Ellert, John N. Sherburne, L. W. Sanborn. 

General agents for the Pacific Coast tor the PREMIER CYCLE MANU- 
FACTURING CO. The only wheel backed by impartial tests of the Ord- 
nance Department. U. S. Government. See Government Tests printed Id 

our catalogue. 

Three highest awards at 
World's Fair 1893. 

HELICAL TUBE PRE- 
MIERS: No other manufac- 
turer can use the Helical 
Tube. The highest grade 
jjtoytri ■ eY-^^Cr^tesa^ finest, and strongest bicycle 
in the world 

The Premier Gucleru 

Has just completed the finest 
cyclery on the coasc.on Baker 
street, directly opposite the 
panhandle of the Park, and 
have introduced many new 
features. Elegant accommo- 
dations have been provided 
for ladies and gentlemen, who 
can have every comfort and 
convenience . Lockers are 
furnished for patrons, and 
their wheels will be carefully 
cared for and repaired when 
necessary. Shower baths and 
dressing rooms have been 
provided, and competent 
teachers will attend to the 
instructions of new riders. 

The renting, repairing, and 
care hi wheels will be made a 
special feature of the estab- 
lishment. 

PREMIER GYGLERy, 312-3H Baker St., S. F. 

Or to Collins & Co., 1018 Market St.; C. F. Cormack, 1006 Valencia St.; G. W. 
Glosser, 1718 Devisadero St.; R J. Harrison, 429 McAllister St 
"Ask the conductor to let you off at Baker street " 



KftMBLEK BICYCLES 




Depot. Salesroom, and Cyclery. 
East entrance to Panhandle of Park. 

Send all orders to 



Are Pre-eminent. 



G. & J. Tires | 

t 

Wood Rims 



Steel Riuis 



Copper Rims 




.//■ No. 10. weight 15 and 18 lbs 

% No. 14, weight 22 pounds 

1-gNo. 12, weight 25 pounds 

S^J? Ladies' E, weight 19& lbs 

Ladies' D, weight 24 lbs 



Ttios. H. B. VflRNEY, SWS&IK5; 



San Francisco 
Los Angeles. 



TH0S. E. KENT, 



597 Mission St. 

San Francisco, Cal Cor. Second 

LADIES and 
GENTLEMEN'S 



Bicycle 
Suits 



TO ORDER ONLY. 




July 






SAX I'RANCISCO NIWS 






pon the tr 

_'ht fall ami inert with -■ 

of the frog when swimming i.it of ti : . 

temporary bicyclist a-whi 

t" Mi ad's notice. This at Brst prejudiced him 

lingly against the wheel, for he deems hisofti 
•I for any Reflection, however, 

has decided him to think better of tin-, ami it even trans- 
that he has taken >• - on the machine «itli 

no ill effects. It may be thai Mr. Cleveland will begin his 

new diversion at Gray Gal )"■•.■/.■ Lrttrr <■• Chicago 

3 to woman a charm that she herself was 
ignorant of. All the ordinances offi red by aldermen seek- 
ing notoriety will not prevent the wearing of bloomers, 
believe it i* tin- beginning of the emancipation of 
woman's dress. At different stages of the world the gown 
was worn alternately by women and men. What men now 

wear gowns '.' Bloomers have come to stay. 

The American Cyclist says Johnny Baer. a nine-year old 
son of Postmaster J. M. Baer of Appleton, Wis., is proba- 
bly the youngest juvenile trick rider in the country. He 
does many tricks performed by professionals. 

Qceen Margharita of Italy is an expert rider of the 
fascinating wheel, and recently the cycle club of Milan pre- 
sented her with a gold wheel, which is probably the most 
beautiful and valuable cycle ever made. 

With English women, who are extremely fond of bicycling. 
it has become a fad to have wheels quite out of the ordi- 
nary. Lady Dudley has a white enameled wheel, with 
handles of beautiful ivory. 

Count Tolstoi, although 67 years old, is an enthusiastic 
bicyclist, and has joined the Moscow Cycling Club, which 
numbers among its members many locally famous "scorch- 
ers." 

Miss Kate Field has taken to the wheel, and may be seen 
almost any day riding around Washington, not in the con- 
ventional skirt, but in knickerbockers of the "new woman." 

A girl may feel all right in bloomers when on her bicycle, 
but off the two wheeled steed the boldest of new women 
are more or less embarrassed. — Cycling. 

The wheelmen of Los Angeles are preparing to build a 
new cycle track that will cost about 88,000. 

The heaviest cyclist in the world is said to be Dr. Meldon 
of Dublin, who weighs 378 pounds. 

American made bicycles are meet ng with a good sale in 
the vicinity of Melbourne. 

Sanger now rides an 80 gear and proposes to put on an 
84 as soon as he can get it. 

Shadow dance bicycle meets are a Canadian institution. 



The famishing goads sold by John W. Carmanv, 25 Kearny street, 
are worn by the best-dressed men in the city, because the goods are 
the best in the market and the variety is complete. 




Makes hard 

water soft 

Pearline. Every woman 
knows just what tli.u means 
r. Washing in hard water 
lifficult, and tli'' re 
^. suits so poor! Pearl- 
— '■•'\^ < '/f > \ ine reduces the 
labor, whether you 
W® use soft water or hard. 
But use Pearline. and it's just as easy to wash 
with hard water as with soft water — and the 
results are just as good. Pearline saves more 
things than your labor, though. We'll tell you 
of these savings from time to time. Keep your 
eye on Pearline "ads." 

Beware of imitations. •« JAMES PYLE, New York. 

ft Great Opportunity. 

Large Golden Gate Park lot ; size 
71:10x150:6. For less than $32 
per front foot. On Grattan St., 
east of Stanyan. One of the most 
sheltered spots in San Francisco. 
Only three blocks from Golden 
Gate Park. 

Convenient to five street railways : 
Metropolitan, Oak, Ellis, Haight, 
and San Mateo Electric. 
Street work done. 

Price, $2,250. Easy Terms. 

Apply Baldwin & Hammond, 
10 Montgomery street. 

J. fl. W. Uindborrj, Dentist, 

336 POST STREET, Rooms 2-3. (Opposite Union Sg.ua re) 
Telephone 2275, San Francisco. 



[}R. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 

114 Geary St., Sar\ Francisco, 



Dentist. 



The Munger, 



Weight 20 Lbs. Price, $130. 



The Daintiest 
Ladies' Wheel 
On the Market. 



It is the highest product of the manufacturer's art. Light 
and handsome, and made of only the very finest of material. 
It is a hand-made machine. 



HOOKER & CO. 



CYCLE DEALERS, 

16-18 Drumm Street. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 




^#« 



ft BLACK evening dress is fashionable either in winter 
or in summer. Black satin waists are worn with 
gajze or grenadine skirts, and are trimmed with mousse- 
line de soie or chiffon on the same color or with white lace. 
Some have the fichus and berthas of black chiffon, trimmed 
with narrow yellow lace, and this looks very light and 
cool. India silks have had to yield in favor of the taffetas, 
and a taffeta silk gown in these days is a very good invest- 
ment. In the light colors there is a great choice and 
a wide range in price. But, made with two waists, one 
high and one low, they form, as it were, a background 
for a summer wardrobe, which helps along in a marvelous 
way. Lace trimmings look well on them, but are not a 
necessity. Some of the prettiest of these silks have a satin 
stripe, and if ribbons of the same shade as the stripe are 
used, there is no necessity for lace or chiffon. These silks 
stand out very nicely, and yet can be fitted to the figure 
much better than the heavier silks. For young and old 
alike they are the fashion, and for once fashion has given 
us something to be thankful for. The dotted Swiss muslins 
are very much the rage this summer. A pale pink with 
black dots has a pink silk underskirt and is itself trimmed 
with six narrow ruffles, edged alternately with black and 
white lace, very narrow. The low waist is made on the 
plan called the baby waist, and is exceedingly soft and full. 
It has a bertha of one flounce of the muslin, on which are 
sewed several ruffles, very narrow and all edged with the 
black and white lace. As this bertha goes over the sleeves, 
which are exceedingly large anyway, the breadth across 
the back is somewhat startling. However, the waist is 
then made by force of contrast to look several inches 
smaller, and as the general appearance is that of a French 
fashion plate, there can surely be no fault found. 

China blue duck jacket suits, relieved by white trim- 
mings, are stylish for the seashore, though hardly to be 
recommended for the girl who cannot have an extensive 
wardrobe. For her a white suit is preferable, to be worn 
with different shirt waists. In either case the jacket has 
a short Eton back, with very large revers and collar. 
Carved pearl buttons decorate the pointed fronts. If pos- 
sible the wardrobe must contain one grass linen, beside the 
duck suit, for this cool material is very fashionable. An 
ecru grass linen is pretty, made with a waist front drop- 
ping over the belt, which is of white linen duck to match 
the large sailor collar. The puffed sleeve tops of ecru 
linen have close lower sleeves of white and the hem of the 
skirt is bordered by a white bias band three inches wide. 

Speakino of cool effects in interior furnishings, we are 
led to comment on the absolute indispensability of white in 
all harmonious decorative schemes, particularly those for 
summer seasons. We see wonderful transformations 
wrought where a room is done in blue and white (the Ori- 
ental's favorite), yellow and white, pink and white, and so 
on — the white always performing its function as a factor 
in contrasts and the carrying out of artistic conceptions. 

Laced shoes, with broad heels, are in favor for ordinary 
wear. A pretty style is of tan calf, foxed with glace kid. 
Dressy buttoned boots have tan uppers and patent leather 
foxings. A new low russet shoe has a medium square toe 
and low English heel, with two buttoned straps on the 
instep. 

Rose pink dimities make lovely gowns for pretty debu- 
tantes. These are trimmed with black chantilly lace inser- 
tions and are completed with belt and stock of black satin 
ribbon. Cotton crepons, in some of the daintier combina- 
tions, may be used to advantage. 

AVith youthful muslin dresses are worn white ribbon 
belts, fastened with pearl buckles. Balloon sleeves, in a 
angle puff, are a rule with thin summer gowns, to be worn 
with long white gloves. 



Cne of the things to do seems to be to take a genuine German 
lunch, dinner, or supper, with a Stein of the celebrated Schliiz 
draught Beer, as served at the Schlitz Headquarters, 411 Bush 
street, opposite the California Hotel. Not only the knowing ones 
of the town, but the knowing stranger in our midst, seek this old 
and well-known Restaurant. 



Great 
Sacrifice- 



Clearance 
Sale 



NOW IN PROGRESS. 



Everything at 

Forcing-out 

Prices. 



See daily papers for particulars. 




MURPHY BUILDING. Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. b2t. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



New Whatcom, 



Washington, 



Is at the head of Bellingham Bay, on Puget Sound. It is the North- 
west City of the State of Washington; population about 10,000. 
It is the third city in size aud wealth in Western Washington. All 
its industries are thriving. 

IT HAS ADVANTAGES possessed by no other point in the State of 
Washington; the country is rich in coal, iron, and other minerals; 
it is rich in agricultural aud timber land; the city is lighted by 
electricity ; it has two electric street oar lines ; the water supply is 
from a large mountain lake 316 feet above the city front; the quan- 
tity of water is unlimited, and is used to drive machinery for 
manufacturing purposes. For domestic use it is unequaled. 

NEW WHATCOM is the home of the Bellingham Bay and British Colum- 
bia Railroad, and of the Bellingham Bay and Eastern Railroad; 
it is the American terminus of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and 
the Pacific Coast terminus of the Great Northern Railroad: the 
Northern Pacific Railroad is malting preparations to enter the city; 
its harbor is one of the best in the world; the steamships of the 
Pacific Coast S. S. Company for the North all go there; steamers 
arrive at and depart daily from New Whatcom for all ports on 
Puget Sound. 



It is the Coming Great City. 



Gold. Silver. 

Chas. F. Blackburn, E. M., 

and 

Practical Mining Geologist, 

Weaverviile, Trinity County, Cal. 

Gold mines of :iuy description Specialty— Free milling 
quartz ^'ohi lode* ;iud large bodies of hydraulic placer gold 
deposits Prices low and easy terms. Big profits sure, as 
I handle none but dividend-payers and am careful in the 
selection of good properties only Will examine and report 
on mines In this region or elsewhere. More than do years' 
mining and geological experience. Terms low 



Metal. 



Mineral. 



PQ. D BUILDING 
. OL D. PAPER. 



116 Battery St., S. F., Cal. 



Paraffine Paint Co., 



July rj, 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO N'EWS LETTER 



21 



O^rr 3 ) 



E5UNBCAMS1 



*' QLEAflK, sir." said the bell-boy to ■ Texas hotel clerk, -Nuru- 
i ber 4" says there mini no towel in his room '* "Tell him to 
ueoneof the window curiam*. ' He says, too, there aim no 
pillows." "Telt him to put his coat and Test under his head " "And 
he wants a pitcher of water." "Suffering Cyrus! Uut he is the 
wont kicker 1 ever struck in my life. Carry him up the horse pail." 
"He wants to know if he can't have alight." "Here, confound 
him' Gire him this lantern, and ask him if he wants the earth, and 
i Ihe'll have it fried on only one bide, or turned over.'*— Texas Sitt- 
ings. 

Ti- true she wear? her brothar'a ties. 

And dous his tenuis Mazer, 
And rinds bis collars just hex 
But she cannot use his razor. — N. Y. Journal. 

A unroll ant approached a benevolent looking old gentleman the 
other day and said: "Dear sir, 1 have lost my leg." To which the bene- 
volent-looking gentlemau replied as he hurried away: '"My dear 
fri-'nd, 1 am very sorry, but I have not seen anything of it".— Tid-Bits. 

Mr. Er-"M Dowses (seated beside a stranger in a street car) — 
What time is it bj your watch, please? Stranger— I don't know. 
Mr. Ep^om— But you just looked at it, Stranger— Yes; I only 
wanted to see if it was still there.— Kx. 

"My face is my fortune, sir." she said. ''Er— excuse me, madam, 
but you can't really mean it."' rejoined the astonished male. "Cer- 
tainly. I'm the lady with the iron jaw in the dime museum." — 
Washington Post. 

Wife— I thought that couple walking before us were married, but 
they are not. Hi";ham>-How do you know? Wife— She stopped 
to look into a shop-window, and he stopped and looked, too — Ex. 

"Frat Mockel, why do you always play the piano when your hus- 
b ind is busy writing?" "There is no help for it. He is at work on 
a tragedy, and I have to make him savage."— Buntes Allerlei. 

She (pretending huff) — Are you sorry you kissed me. He (making 
sudden discovery)— Yes, inasmuch as your little brother is under 
the sofa and your father standing on the stairs. — Tid-Bits. 

Doctor— The bicycle gives people the best exercise in the world. 
Patient— But I can't afford to ride a bicycle. Doctor— O, you don't 
need to ride one; just dodge them.— New York Herald. 

Sad-Eyed Stranger- -My young friend, I am sorry to see that you 
care only for outside show. Flashlee Dresser— Sir, I wish you to 
know that I wear silk underwear.— Ex. 

Miss Amateur— Are you musical, Prof. Bisten? Prof. Bisten— 
Ye-*, but if you were going to play anything don't mind ray feelings. 
—Sing-Sing Courier. 

Mrs. Tupenny — Did you know that the TJppertens have a family 
Skeleton? Mr. Tupenny— 0, yes. She's out there on the beach 
now. — Town Topics. 

Oregonian— Is it true that you Bostonians eat nothing but beans? 
Bostonian— Why, certainly not ! We invariably eat pork with them. 
— Roxbury Gazette. 

"Do you think that Blickeus would deceive a friend?" "Of course 
not. None of his friends would believe a' word he says." — Washing- 
ton Star. 

She— Have you ever loved another? He— Yes, of course. Did 
yo i think I'd practice on a nice girl like you?— Life. 

Amy Belle — Don't you think she has a cultivated, voice? Sue 
Sharp— Yes, it certainly is harrowing.— Puck. 

A diamond to be bright must be polished. So with a man. To be 
bright he must have his trials.— Peck's Sun. 

Poverty is a heavy load, but the more there are to support it the 
heavier it is. — Ex. 

The Grand Canon Line !— To the East ! 



Commencing Nov. ^th the "Santa Fe Route ". Popular Overland 
Excursions to Chicago and Eastern Cities will leave every Wednesday. 
Manager in Charge. Through Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleep- 
ers are run to Chicago every day. This is the only Line by which the 
Grand Canon of the Colorado River can be reached. Send for illus- 
trated book giving full particulars. C. H. Speers, A. G. P. A., 650 
Market street, Chronicle Building, Sin Francisco, Cal. 



The wise man of the world, who knows more things than he com- 
monly talks about, is a genial, tolerant soul, who wants to enjoy the 
same freedom that he cheerfully extends to others. When he wants 
a drink he takes it like a gentleman, and being a connoisseur, he 
drinks only that which is good for him. For this reason he calls for 
Argonaut whiskey, and makes sure that he is getting the genuine 
article. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, are the agents for this 
popular and wholesome article. 




It \v 

KnocK^ 

At Your Door. 

A true improvement always receives 
a welcome in the average American 
home, the most home-like home ia the 
world. The coal stove, the gas, the 
water, the sewing machine atid the 
clothes wringer have found an entrance 
everywhere. Another candidate now 
appears. It is 




the new vegetable shortening and sub- 
stitute for lard. Thousands have found 
this as great a blessing as its predeces- 
sors. It is now at your door. Will you 
accept its prober of better cooking in 
your kitchen , better food on your table, 
better health in your household ? 

Cottolone Is sold in 8 and 5 

Sound palls, by all grocers. 
■et the genuine. Made by 

The N. K. Faii-bank 
Company, 

ST. LOUIS and 
Chicago, New York, Bostoa. 




California Enterprise • 



American Condensed 

Company. 



Factory, Marin County, Cal 



Main Office, 330 Pine street 



Combine Economy with 
Satisfaction by Using 



SouMifleld Wellington Goal. 



A. F. cJOHNS X GO. 



Financial Agents. 

Dealers in Bonds and Securities. 
632 Market street, room 9. 



MONEY LOANED. 
San Francisco, Cal. 




For the best value in 

HATS or CAPS 
Go to 

G. Herrmann & Go. 

The Hatters, 

328 Kearny St., 
Near Pine. (Er tire Building) 

The ONLY Retail Hatters 
having their own factory. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS* LETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 




KI^U^S 



A 



THE LAST.— thomas h. muzzey. 

H, not the first love, dearest— but the last. 
(80? Who can tell?) 
The tides of youth run fast— run fast; 

The buds upon the young tree shoot and swell, 

Reckless of frosts. Well— well 1 
Let us not dwell, dear heart, on follies past. 
For now, you know, the green and callow shoots 

Of early spring 
Are dry and withered to the very roots, 

They were Love's first, faint, perfumed offering 

Taking swift wing, 
Leaving a fragrant memory, but no fruits . 

We will not speak of them with smiling scorn. 

They have made way 
For the rich bloom and fruitage later born— 

And born of spirit— not alone of clay, 

Making our day 
Glad with the freshness of perpetual morn. 

Eternal? Dear— let us believe it so, 
Aud in our bliss 

Let dull analysis and doubting go- 
Content so long as in a rapturous kiss 
Like this— my sweet — and this— 

The fullness of celestial joy we know . 

MOODS.— charles Washington coleman in harper's bazar. 

The sunlight crossed my path to-day; 

A brown thrush on a hawthorn spray 

Swung back and forth across the blue; 

The hop-vines leapt an inch or two 

Along their poles toward the sun ; 

The sparrows chirped that ne3ts were done ; 

The calyx broke— a rose was born; 

I heard the snap of growing corn ; 

The world had ta'en the spring to wife, 

And all the air was tense with life ; 

And yet, through some gray mood's despite , 

I feel no love of life to-night. 

Yet I recall a time of pain , 

A shadowless gray day of rain, 

And soundless, save the sobbing storm, 

With cold no hearth-fire e'er may warm, 

A cold that lies against the heart; 

Yet in my veins I felt the start 

Of strength to grapple death in strife, 

Instinct with keenest love of life. 



A FLIGHT FROM GLORY.— eugene lee-haihilton. 

Once, from the parapet of gems and glow, 

An angel said, "O God, the heart grows cold 

On these eternal battlements of gold, 
Where all is pure, but cold as virgin snow. 
Here sobs are never heard ; no salt tears flow ; 

Here there are none to help— nor sick nor old ; 

No wrong to fight, no justice to uphold; 
Grant me Thy leave to live man's life below." 
"And then annihilation ?" God replied. 

" Yes," said the Angel, " even that dread price; 

For earthly tears are worth eternal night." 
' Then go," said God. The Angel opened wide 

His dazzling wings, gazed back on Heaven thrice. 
And plunged forever from the walls of Light. 



A SONG OF A HEART.— frank 1. stanton, in Atlanta constitution. 

Dear heart— I love you! all the day I wonder 

If skies are rich with blue, 
Or bending black with tempest and with thunder, 

Dear heart, dear heart, o'er you ! 
Dear heart— I love you ! when pale stars are gleaming— 

(Sad stars to me, and few !) 
I wonder if God's lovelier lights are streaming 

Dear heart, dear heart, o'er yoa! 

Dear heart— if life had only one bright blossom, 

One rose to meet the dew — 
I'd kiss it, climbing to your restful bosom 

And wear its thorns for you 1 



BANKING. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 1862. 
Capital Paid Up, $3,000,000. Reserve Fund and Undivided Profits, $1,410,000 

Southeast Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 
HEAD OFFICE 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan- 
iamo, and Nelson, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Ta- 
coma, Washington. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
Nkw Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of 
Sydney, Ld ; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits, June 30, 18W $24,061,791 87. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,627,052 -13. 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B POND, Vice-President 

Directors — Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Premery, George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. A. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100.000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class companies, or grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-California Bank. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California St., S. F. 

Capital actually paid up in Cash, $1,000,000. Reserve Fund $ 686,000 

Deposits, June 89, 1895 $30,-172,837 66. Guaranteed Capital. $1,200,000 

OFFICERS— President, Edward Kruse; Vice-President, B. A. Becker; 
Second Vice-President, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Muller. 

Board of Directors— Edward Kruse, George H. Eggers. O. Shoemann, 
A. C. Heineken, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steinhart, 
Daniel Meyer. Attorney. W. S. Goodfellow. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Capital authorized $6,000,000 I Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 f Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART \ Mana „ pr( . 

P. N. LILIENTHALj Mana £ er S- 

WELLS, FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 

John J. Valentine President | Homer S.King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier I F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

2S2 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 

Wm. Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin A. K. P. Harmon 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones J. B. Randol. 

CROCKER-W00LWORTH NATIONAL BANK of san francisco. 

Cob. Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid-Up Capital »1 ,000,000. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond. 



July 27, 1895. 



I-RAM \VS I.I I'll K. 



»3 









IN militai , pretended 

• ■ hunt' in order toai to a military exercise. 

A chimpansee bad been red on cake when sick : after his 
rery he often feigned coughing In order t<> procure 
dainties. The cucoo, known, lavs it-, eggs in 

another bird's nest, and to make the deception surer it 
t;ikr> away one of the other bird Animal* arc oon- 

- .if their deceit, as shown by the facl that they try 
retly and noiselessly ; they show a sense of guilt 
if detected . they take precautions in advance to avoid dis- 
covery; in some cases they manifest regret and repent- 
ance. Thu>. bees which >t<-al hesitate often before and 
after their exploits, as if they feared punishment. A 

naturalist describes how liis monkey c mitted theft; 

while he pretended to sleep the animal regarded him will] 
hesitation, and stopped every time his master moved or 
seemed 011 the point of awakening. 

A recent census bulletin deals with the increase of 

the number of women engaged in professional occupations 
since 1S7U. and the results brought out arc very striking. 

Women employed as— 1800. 1S70. 

Actors 3,949 C92 

Architects 22 1 

Artist!) and teachers of art 10,810 412 

Authors, literary and scientific persons 2,725 159 

Chemists, assayers, and metallurgists 40 

Clprgvmen 1,235 07 

Dentists 337 24 

Designers, draughtsmen, and inventors 306 13 

Engineers and surveyors 127 

Journalists 888 35 

Lawyers 208 5 

Musicians and teachers of music 34,519 5.753 

Government officials, Federal, State, and local 4.875 414 

Physicians and surgeons 4,555 527 

Teachers 245,965 84,047 

Theatre managers, showmen, etc 034 100 

Veterinary surgeons 2 .... 

Bookkeepers and accountants 27,7771 fift1fi 

Clerks and copyists 64,048!' 0,uib 

Stenographers and typewriters 21,185 7 

Saleswomen 58,449 2,775 

A little machine, whose purpose is to register 

exactly the manner in which a piece of music is played, has 
been brought into use by the savants of the Sorbonne, in 
Paris. It is an adaptation 'of the phonograph, which can 
easily be applied to any piano, and is capable of giving, on 
a slip of paper, a full record of any piece performed, in- 
cluding the duration of the notes, the rapidity of playing, 
the variations in touch, etc., with an exactness which no 
ear could equal. Each key struck inscribes its mark, 
which is made by an inked st3'lusonamovingbandof paper. 
The force, speed, etc. , with which the fingers have done 
their work, are clearly shown, each false note is recorded, 
and when the piece is ended a record exists which is free 
from any possibility of flattery or mistake. This truth- 
telling apparatus is likely to become the automatic musical 
critic of the future. 

"There are as many laughs as there are vowels," 

says L'lllustration Europeenne, Brussels, June 2d. "Child- 
ren, who laugh on A (the broad sound as in farther) laugh 
openly and frankly. The laugh in E (as in fete) is appro- 
priate to melancholy persons. The I (as in machine) is the 
habitual laugh of naive, slavish, timid, or irresolute per- 
sons. It is said to be also the laugh of blondes. The O 
indicates generosity and hardihood. Shun like a pestilence 
those that laugh in U ; it is the tone of misers and hypo- 
crites. There is some truth in these rules in spite of their 
exaggeration." 

One of the finest stocks of imported goods to be found in the city 
is now kept at J. M. Litchfield's, the merchant and fashionable 
military tailor. He is fully prepared to furnish customers with the 
finest quality of goods and the most perfect fitting clothing. He is 
always prepared with the latest styles in garments, and his long ex- 
perience and promptness in business has made him popular among 
customers. His place of business is at 12 Post street, where he is 
always prepared to take orders. 

Dr. H. W. Bunsaker has removed Ms offices to 114 Geary street, up- 
stairs, near Grant avenue. 



BANKING. 



CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST CO. 

■ ■ 

Ooiunni MoirrooincHi uto CALtroiuri \ Bra., s B\ 
OFFICERS .1 D Fry, V Proaldeol . J 

Dftltell Brown, - inrar. 

Vdmlnlstrmtor nnd Trustee under 
Q H-.Hiui ff eatnioR ■■! InoompotoDl persona and minora, bs 
Asslew 1 inj other uui and Is u legal deposi- 

tors for court 1111*1 trust fund 

ids ii> Hi.- oolleollon of Intci residents 

or others. 
Acts as Trustee of mortgn ■■ ■ t sod Individuals, and fti 

■ 
Receives deposits subject to Chech and allows tnteresl «>ti dally balances. 

Issues certificates of doi Interest. Receives 

deposits in Its savlnirs department. 
Wills drawn and taken care ol without charge. 

nation and advlci n t matter ohi srfully given. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to rem at prices from 86 per annum upward, 
according i" stxe, and 1 aluables <'t all Kinds ore stored at low rates. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $.1,01X1,1)00 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits [Ootober I, 1894).. 8,158,180 70 

WILLIAM ALVORD Presldenl I CHARLES R. BISHOP.. Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith Ass't Cashier | I. F. MOTJI/TOH x*a Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Tretnont National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres: Virginia City (Nev.)— 
Agency of The Bank of California; Chicago— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Australia and New Zealand— Bank of 
New Zealand ; China, Japan, and India— Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York. Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Fraukfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney. Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 
Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. Paid-Up Capital, $300,000. 

OFFICERS 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President. | S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 
Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Mofllt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Well, Fargo, & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital Paid-up $2,450,000 

Reserve $375,000 

San Francisco Office— 124 California St. London Office— 73 Lombard St. 
Portland Branch— Chamber ol Commerce Building. 
Tacoma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER I Ass't Manager. WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAVFRIEDERICH. 
LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $800,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers 1 Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENBAUM 1 „„„„„.„ 
C. ALTSCHUL j Managers. 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS, FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

Corner BUSH AND SANSOME ST. 

Steel safes rented from $5 a year upward. Trunks and packages stored 
at reasonable rates. Absolute security for valuables. Prompt and careful 
attention to customers. 

OFFICE HOURS: 8 A. M. to 6 P. M. 

CALIFORNIA TITLE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY. 

Paid-up Capital, $S50,000. Cash Reserve Fund, $25,000. 
L. R. ELLERT. Manager. 
This company loans money on real estate and transacts a general trust 
business. It also makes and continues abstracts of title and issues guar- 
antee policies which protect the holder against loss. 
OFFICE— Mills Building. San Francisco. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President 

ERNST BRAND Secretary 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 




'?. - ~T\ 



wennn&ftsfflfc 






SNOT/HER illustration of the wonderful variety of uses 
to which glass may be put is furnished in the report of 
an invention said to have been recently brought out in 
Boston. By this process glass is made to represent a 
highly polished wood when viewed from the exterior, and 
when looked at from the interior of the house gives a semi- 
transparent and very handsome effect. In the veneering 
process the glass, which may be either plain or ground, is 
clouded with a liquid dye which is applied with a sponge 
in such a way as to represent the grain of the wood which 
it is desired to imitate. After shading has been softened, 
the grain is made clear and fast by an application of 
photographer's varnish. The glass is then heated slightly 
to prevent the shadings from merging, and the various 
shades of dye required are applied with a syringe. A 
final coat of photographer's varnish is then added which 
increases the brilliancy and protects the dyes. 

Inquiry has revealed the fact that the man with the 

hammer upon railway lines was practically useless as a 
discoverer of flawed axles. We hear that an electrical en- 
gineer has invented a contrivance with which it is possible 
to instantaneously detect a flaw in the axle of a railway 
engine or carriage. If any satisfactory results are ar- 
rived at after a thorough test of its efficacy, it will be 
welcome news. 

More than half of the salmon now packed in the 

United States comes from Alaska, whore more than three 
million dollars are invested in the fisheries. Last year 
there were twenty-two canneries in operation, which 
packed 646,000 cases. — Grocers Criteron. 

Attachments obtained by relatives of an insolvent 

will be set aside as to other creditors, on proof of acts of 
collusion between the relatives and the insolvent to deceive 
other creditors, and the inability of such relatives to satis- 
Eactorily explain theirclaims. 

A purchaser of stock at fifty per cent, of its face 

value, with notice that such stock, though nominally full- 
paid stock, has not been fully paid, is liable to the creditors 
of the corporation for the unpaid half of the amount of his 
stock so purchased. 

One employed to sell goods on commission, paying 

his own expenses, cannot employ others to assist him, and 
render the employer liable for the expenses of such other 
parties, who must look to him for their compensation. 

An employer is not bound to anticipate every prob 

able risk which may happen in the use of a machine, but 

discharges his duty if it gives such general directions as 
will enable the employee to comprehend the danger. 

A letter is not admissible in evidence without proof 

of its being genuine, and this proof cannot be supplied 
solely by what appears on the face of the letter itself — 
that is, the contents, the letter head, etc. 

Where a merchant is induced to sell certain goods 

at a certain price by the false statements of the purchaser 
that the former's rival in trade offers them at such price, 
the merchant may rescind the sale. 

In Denmark a drunken man is taken to the station 

and sent home in a carriage next day. The publican who 
served him last has to pay the cost. This has materially 
decreased drunkenness. 

Individual officers and directors of a corporation 

which has infringed a patent cannot be ordered to ac- 
count for the profits of such infringement. 

Knowledge which an agent has acquired in business 

other than that of his principal cannot be imputed to the 

principal himself. 

P. F. McNulty, maker of tine shoes, whose place of business is 
located at 139 Post St.. on the first Moor of Liebes's Building, has the 
reputation among the fashionable people of this city of making the 
best-fitting shoes, the most stylish, and the most comfortable. His 
long experience in the business, and his careful attention to the 
wants of his patrons, has given him the reputation of being the 
leader. If you want a perfect tit go to McNulty. 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Fireman's Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY. OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,000,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENCLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager, 130 California St., S. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE. FlRE REINSURANCE. 

SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, OF LONDON, founded a. d. mo. 

Casta Assets, 810,270,535, Oldest purely tire insurance oftlce in the world. 

THE LION FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD., OF LONDON, 

Established A. D. 1870. Cash Assets, tl, 108,095. 

THE IMPERIAL INSURANCE CO,, LTD., OF LONDON. 

Instituted 1803. Cash Assets. $9,362,920. 40 years of business on Pacific 
Coast WM, J. LANDERS, Manager for the Pacific Coast. 

205 Sansome St., near Pine. 

PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT ASSETS. 

WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto $1,642,001.80 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO., of now York 1,504,714.11 
BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto 1,164,196.26 

H. M. GRANT, Manager. C. A. STUART, Ass't Manager. 

Office — 123 California Street. 

~ QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA^" 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up $ 500,000 

Assets 3,117,551 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,651,189 

ROllERT DICKSON, Manager, 101 Montgomery St. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St. 
AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, OERMANY. Established 1825 

Capital, $2,250,000. Total Assets, $6,851,653 65 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT: 301 Sansome St., S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, Established im . 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. incorporated noo. 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

413 California St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 
Capital '. $6,700,000 

13ALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 316 California St., S. F. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF 1IAM13URG. GERMANY. 

V. CARUS DRIFFIELD, Manager tor the Faoiflo Coast Branch. 

213 Sansome St., S. F. 

Assets $2.711 .873 00 

Liabilities 923,000 TO 

Surplus to Polios Holders $U618,873 00 

Cash Assets in United suites 684,339 00 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., ^'^""P"^ California St., SF. 
REMOVED TO 824 MARKET STREET, PHELAN BUILDING. 




July .'7. 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



WEIGHING THE BABY. 

SAYS T Igning the baby should never 

be neglected; for. however well ami happy it may 
if it is not putting 00 Its normal addition of weigh! 
(here is something wrong. In adults, loss of weight la one 

of tin- most Important si^'iis . which Interfere 

with nutrition; but in infants it la not a question merely of 
weight; any lessening of the norma] gain should at- 
tract attention, for long before the various troubles of di- 
>n to which hand-fed infants arc so liable to show 

themselves by general symptoms, or by wasting, they will 

interfere with that steady increase of weight which, week 
by week, a healthy infant shows. Dr. Griffith, lecturing 
on infantile disorders, points out that for from three to five 

days after birth it is common for children to lose weight. 
Dunn-: that time they lose meconium and urine, and water 
porated in respiration, while they have not yet begun 
to absorb their full supply of nutriment, At the end of the 
first week, however, the baby should have made up its 
weight to what it was at birth. Then from the end of the 
first week it should gain an ounce a day. "A baby." he 
says. " which gains half an ounce a day is doing fairly well. 
but a child doing thoroughly well gains double that amount 
or more. This should continue until the fourth month, 
after which a daily gain of half an ounce a day is satisfac- 
tory." Accurate observation and careful recording of the 
weight of an infant gives the earliest warning of digestive 
troubles, and should be looked on in the light of a duty by 
those who undertake the responsible task of bringing up a 
child by hand, for on the success with which the child di- 
gests the food presented to it depends, in large degree, 
the perfection of the framework on which the future man 
is built. 

THE cultivation of Indian hemp, by a number of Arabs, 
in Alameda County, is one of the latest agricultural 
novelties in California. It is from this plant that the 
famed " hasheesh " of the Orient is made. The extract 
is known to medicine as Cannabis Indica, and is a narcotic 
of much value for the relief of headache and other ills. 
The range of climate and the diversity of soil in this State 
are so great that an almost infinite variety of agricultural 
products may be successfully cultivated. Both cotton and 
tobacco have been experimentally grown in California, 
with encouraging results, and there seems reason to be- 
lieve that rice and sugar cane will be numbered among 
our staple crops at no distant date. 



THE Jewish residents of the slum district of Boston 
have been holding an indignation meeting against the 
Christian missions of the neighborhood. They protest that 
their children are rapidly being won to Christianity, and 
that, while the mission workers have been unable to reach 
the older people — of this they boast — yet by means of their 
schools, gymnasiums, reading-rooms, boys' clubs, etc., they 
are able to win many of the little ones to the gospel of the 
Nazarene. The number of these converts, they declare in 
dismay, is rapidly on the increase. — The Golden Rule, Bos- 
ton. 

THE Liberal defeat in England is attributed to the 
combination of the saloon interest with the Episcopal 
Church. The late Liberal government favored a Sunday 
law in restraint of the business of publicans, and the 
church people were aroused against the proposed dises- 
tablishment in Wales. This alliance of " beer and the 
Bible " bowled over the Liberals. Such a queer combina- 
tion is quite likely to be seen in American politics some 
day. _____ 

INFORMATION comes from London that the contribu- 
tions of Irish- Americans have been a fertile source of 
corruption in the Irish National party, of late years. But 
the money will probably continue to flow abroad from the 
pockets of the dupes on this side of the Atlantic, no mat- 
ter how bad a lot may be chosen to howl in Parliament for 
the independence of Ireland. 

Children cutting teeth, and suffering from the various disorders 
incident thereto, need Steedman's Soothing Powders. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 
309 and 311 Sansome St. San Francisco, Cal. 

I ORR1 BPONDENTB: 

FINDLAY. DURHAM A BRODIE . 43 and 40Thrcadncedte St.. London 

SIMPSON, M.\, kikiiV ,v CO » South Cnsllf St., Liverpool 

FUERST BROS ,\ CO 2 and 4 Stone St.. New York 

Cresta Blanca Souvenir G° ld Medal, 

Paris Expos- 

Vintages. ition, 1SS9. If your grocer will 

not furnish you the genuine 

Cresta Blauca wine, send to our salesrooms. 

Goods delivered free. 

WETMORE-BOWEN CO., 140 Montgomery St. 

BOTTLING CELLARS— Larkin and McAllister Sts., S. F. 
VINEYARD. WINERY, and CELLARS— Llvermore, Cal. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG X CO., 

The Model 

American 

Caterers. 

1206 Sutter St., S. F. Telephone 2388. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Osborn Hill Gold Mining and Milling Company. 
Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. ; location of 
works. Grass Valley, Cal. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Thirty-first day of May, 1895, an assessment, No. 5, of Twenty-five 
cents (25c.) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 20, 331 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 
An stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
8th DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on MONDAY, the Twenty-ninth day 
of July, 1895, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

K. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 21), 331 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 19 

Amount per Share 10 cents 

Levied June 25, 1895 

Delinquent in Office July 30, 1895 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 21, 1895 

A-. K. DURBROW, Seoretary. 
Office— Room 69, N evada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Hakalau Plantation Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Hakalau Plan- 
tation Company will be held at the office of the company, 327 Market 
street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

THURSDAY, the 1st DAY OF AUGUST, 1895, 
at the hour of li o'clock a. m., for the election of a Board of Directors to serve 
for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other business as may 
come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Monday, July 29, 
1895. at 3 o'clock P. M. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office— 327 Market street, San Francisco. Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Lady Washington Consolidated Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Lady "Washington 
Consolidated Company will be held at the office of the company, room 33, 
Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, on Wednesday, the 

31ST DAY OF JULY, 1895, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
to sei ve for the ensuing year, and for the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Saturday. 
July 27th. at 12 o'clock M, J. E. JACOBUS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 33. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Franoisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Loco 
motive Works for the election of Trustees for the ensuing year, and the 
transaction of such other business as may be brought before the meeting. 
will be held at the office of the company, southeast corner of Beale and 
Howard streets, San Francisco, on 

MONDAY, THE 5th DAY OF AUGUST, 1895, 
atthehourof 11 o'clock a. m. L. R. MEAD, Secretary. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1895- 




IT is still rather dull in society circles; those of our ma- 
trons who have returned to town have been too busily 
occupied in getting settled in place after their outing and 
preparing their children for school duties once more to 
give either time or thought to amusement. Mrs. Sahlein's 
handsome lunch at her Jackson street home was one of the 
most recent events in that line; another was the luncheon 
at which Miss Cora Wallace presided as hostess, when she 
entertained a party of ladies invited to meet Miss Mattie 
Sargeant, of Stockton, who was the chief guest of the oc- 
casion; and yet a third hostess was Mrs. Gibbs, who had 
fourteen ladies seated around her hospitable table. 

The most important society gathering of the present 
week was the wedding of Miss Belle McPherson and Lieu- 
tenant McCracken, of the Navy, which was solemnized at 
the McPherson residence on Fillmore street on Wednesday. 
The parlors of the McPherson residence were converted 
into floral bowers by the profusion of beautiful blossoms 
and green tendrils with which they were adorned, the 
floral arch from which depended the typical marriage em- 
blem being a special feature, and beneath it the bridal 
party formed while the Rev. Mr. Walk, of Trinity Church, 
performed the ceremony which converted Miss Belle 
McPherson into Mrs. Alexander McCracken. She looked 
charmingly in her bridal robe of heavy white corded silk 
elaborately trimmed with point lace, which is a family heir- 
loom, as are also the handsome pearls which she wore. 
Her fleecy tulle veil was held in place by a spray of orange 
blossoms, and her hand bouquet was of bridal roses. 
Beautiful Miss Anna Hall, who officiated as maid-of-honor, 
was gowned in white organdie over white satin, and she 
carried a cluster of La France roses. Lieutenant Schwerin 
supported the groom as best man. After congratulations 
had been offered and received, an elaborate bridal dijeuner 
was served, and later in the day the happy pair left town 
for a honeymoon trip through the southern part of the 
State. A feeling of sadness was mingled with the good 
wishes offered the newly-wedded couple, occasioned by the 
knowledge to the bride's friends here that they are to lose 
one of their favorites, as the future abiding place of 
Lieutenant and Mrs. McCracken will be the other side of 
the Rockies; at present it will be at Annapolis, where the 
groom is on duty at the Naval Academy. 

While San Francisco society has of late lost many of its 
fair young members by marriage, it is again quite fre- 
quently the gainer of new members to its ranks by the 
same means. For instance, the marriage in New York, 
last Saturday, of William Babcock to Mrs. Beck, whose 
brothers, the Messrs. May, are already known in the social 
and club life of our city through their marriage to the 
pretty Coleman girls, will no doubt bring us a charming 
acquisition, and the news of Albert E. Castle's engagement 
to Miss Jennie Winston, one of Los Angeles's fairest daugh- 
ters, has awakened the hope that the bride will prove to 
be another attractive young matron in its ranks. 

The marriage of Miss Agnes Howard and Duncan Hayne 
is set for Saturday, the 10th of August, and the ceremony, 
which will be performed at the home of the bride's brother. 
W. H. Howard, in San Mateo, will be a very quiet one. 
Members of both families (which alone will, however, make 
the gathering a large one) and most intimate friends only 
will be present. 

Theatre parties have been a popular way of entertain- 
ing one's friends since the coming of the Lyceum Com- 
pany. Scarcely an evening last week but' what, there 
were several in evidence, and this week they have been 
even more numerous; in some cases dinners preceded them, 
and supper followed in every instance. The Baldwin, the 
California, and the Columbia each came in for its share, 
though the first-named got the lion's proportion. 



Enjoyable as the season has been at Del Monte, that de- 
lightful place will be seen at its best in August when the 
high tide of fashion sets in that direction, and society in 
fullest ranks will then disport itself for several weeks. 
Almost everyone known in fashionable life in San Francisco 
is booked for some time during the month, and prepara- 
tions are well under way to make it one of the gayest 
months known at Del Monte in a decade. First on the 
programme comes the tennis tournament which will con- 
tinue several days; then will follow the races, for which 
Walter Hobart will bring down a large string of horses, 
and other stables will be well represented; there will be 
another polo match between the Riverside and tin- Burling- 
ame teams. Golf will be played, and finally pigeon shoot- 
ing by the Country Club. Intermingled with these attrac- 
tions will be many minor ones, hops every night and a 
grand ball to wind up with, so who can wonder that 
August is looked forward to with the most pleasurable 
anticipations by our beaux and belles. 



Mrs. and the Misses Graham from the Presidio are en- 
joying camp life, not at Monterey with the rest of the 
army, but at Lake Pilarcitos where they have been for the 
past ten days. The Fred Tallants haveohanged their base 
from Menlo Park to Blythedalc, which will be their locale 
during August. The Magee-Hush party have returned 
from their camp in the Yosemite Valley, 'and will swell the 
August crush at Del Monte. The Isaac Hechts have gone 
to Lake Tahoe, where they will remain several weeks. 
Mr. and Mrs. George Low and Miss Low were among the 
many departers from the Hotel Rafael last week, the 
majority of those leaving betaking themselves to Del 
Monte for the rest of the season. The Middle ton-Thomp- 
son-Howison party left for Alaska on Tuesday last. 

Linderman's Opera House, in Alameda, will surely draw 
a large contingent of San Franciscans to its doors during 
the early days of August, when the youth and beauty 0! 
Alameda are to appear in a series of living pictures in the 
cause of charity. The tableaux chosen will embrace a lar<re 
variety of subjects, running the gamut from the pathetic 
to the laughable, the dramatic to the farcical, and difficult 
indeed will be the spectator who cannot see something to 
admire. Among the participants will be Misses Mamie 
Gibbons, Delia Kruger, Madeline Rosseter, Maud Russell 
Alice Swayne, Dora Benson, Rose Elliott— in fact, nearly 
all the belles of Alameda County will be seen in one or more 
poses, and the affair promises to be a great success. 

An event of this week was the arrival last Monday of the 
steam yacht Eleanor, with its owner, Mr. W. A. Slater, of 
Connecticut, and a party of his friends on board, who are 
making a leisurely tour of the world. The yacht has been 
so glowingly described as a miracle of beauty and luxury 
that curiosity has been greatly excited in the breasts of 
our swim to have a peep at this floating palace, but it 
could not be gratified, owing to the briefness of the stay in 
port. However, the yacht will be here again in a tew 
weeks after doing the Alaskan shores, and then, it is said. 
Mr. Slater will do some entertaining aboard, and no doubt 
be entertained in return on shore. 

Among the early August entertainments in the city will 
be the reception which is to be given to the Reverend W, 
H. Moreland and Mrs. Moreland by the members of Si, 
Luke's parish upon the return of the rector from his vaca- 
tion trip East, The reception will be held on the evening 
of the 14th, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Theo, Smith, 
and it promises to be largely attended, as well as a very 
pleasant affair. 

Bicycling and tennis seem to be the chief amusements at 
San Rafael, out of doors; cards are indulged in by the 
dowagers within doors from early morning until late at 
night, and luncheons and dinners are given at the hotel by 
visitors to other guests as well as the residents there- 
abouts, who reciprocate in kind. The Elliott McAllisters 
were dined by Mrs. Poole; Mrs. Henry L. Dodge gave a 
luncheon for her two young guests; Mrs. Peter Donahue is 
untiring in the number and variety of her gatherings, and 
between straw rides, bowling, and billiards, the young 
people enjoy life in a mild degree. 



July 27, 1895. 



SAN PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



*7 



The steamer City 0/ Prk!»g brought back to us, from 
r the Mikado, Mr. Hager and lu-r daughters, 
rer, will not give San Krancisco the benefit of 
ihi-ir company, ;>> Redondo will be tlnir camping place im- 
mediately upon their return, and they will spend the win- 
ter in the East, with a very decided probability of remain- 
ing ti Another Boclety loss to San 
Francisco this winter will Ik- Mi-.* Laura McEinstry, who 
will accompany Mrs. Henry Jerome when she leaves for 
tin- East in the course of a few weeks, with Europe in the 
distance as the place for her winter a sojourn. Her recent 
entertainers in Washington City, Mr. and Mrs. Henley 
Smith, arc at present in Europe, and slio will, it is under- 
■•!. become one <>f their party. 

The Colonial is registering new arrivals daily. Among 

who have located there this week are: Mrs. Corn- 
wall. Mrs. Widdifield and family, of Honolulu; Mrs. Hyde, 

of this city, having returned from her trip lo London; Mr. 
and Mrs. Rich and family, of Denver; Mrs. Shainwald, 
Mis~ Shainwald. and Mr. Herman Shainwald. Mrs. Becker, 
of Washington, D. C. : Mr. and Mrs. Coster, of Honolulu. 

To-day a garden party will be given at Belvedere, which 
is considered a safe place for such an affair during our 
July weather, as. 'tis said, fogs and winds give that locale 
a wide berth. The entertainment will be for the benefit of 
the church building fund, and will be of a musical and lit- 
erary character, some of our well-known artists in both 
those lines taking part in the programme. 

The Olympic Club gymnasium was a jam on Tuesday 
evening, when one of the club's periodical Ladies Nights 
was held, and the fair sex witnessed an exhibition of feats 
of agility and strength on the part of the members, which 
seemingly pleased them muchly, so enthusiastic was the 
applause bestowed. 

Mrs. W. A. Nevills left on the Alameda Thursday last for 
a visit to the Australian Colonies. On her way home she 
will make a short stay in China, and will also see all that 
is worth seeing in Japan. It is hoped that the sea voyage 
and change of scene will benefit her health, which has been 
rather delicate of late. 



William Greer Harrison will discourse on " The Dream- 
land of Shakespeare " at the next Illustrated Lecture of 
the Camera Club, in Metropolitan Hall on the 7th of August. 

Mrs. Loughborough and family leave for Del Monte in a 
few days, to spend the rest of the summer by the seaside. 

Dr. and Mrs. A. F. Sawyer have taken a villa at Fair 
Oaks for the summer. 



TO prevent women from being completely in the power 
of their husbands, as they are now, so that divorce offers 
them no relief, Mr. Flower, in Arena for June, suggests 
that provision should be made for wives to become pos- 
sessed at marriage of half the husband's property, with 
additional provision for every child that is born. If on ac- 
count of cruelty, abuse, or neglect she seeks divorce, she 
should hold this property in her own right. At present 
many women cannot obtain divorces because they would be 
destitute if they did. Mr. Flower believes this property 
provision would have a good moral effect upon husbands 
inclined to think they hold property rights in their wives. 

A special summer train to Monterey trom Third and Townsend 
streets will be put on this Saturday for the purpose of giving city 
folk an opportunity of leaving here every Saturday afternoon and 
returning on the Monday morning following. The train will leave 
this city at 2 ; 15 p. M. , and arrive in Monterey at 5 :30 p. m , after mak- 
ing but one stop— at San Jose. It will return to town at 11:30 Mon- 
day morning. 

The Oakland, San Leandro and Haywards Electric Railway has 
made, arrangements to serve the public by connecting with the 
broad-gauge local at Fruitvale every half hour. Every Sunday a 
band will discourse excellent music from 11 o'clock a. m. to 6 p. m. at 
Haywards Park, and the cuisine at the club house will be found ex- 
cellent. 

Those who want a fine quality of liquor for medicinal purposes or 
for home use will find the Jesse Moore AA whisky superior to any 
other brand. Sold by all druggists and the principal saloons. 



JlN Qologial, 



Pine and Jones Sis. 



Tin' leading end Dnwl Family Hotel to Ben ITranolsoo 
Too oalnlno Is the pride «>i the hostess 

; ., end snnnj apartments, etngle or 
hi suite, « 1th or without bath 
To eee the Interior In Its beauty and with all its ac- 
oommodatlons means to locate permanently, and 



SPECIAL RATES 



to permum-ni guests. Milliard Room, Elevator. 

1 'nin mm- in to all oars. 

MRS. S. B. JOHNSON, 

Southeast Cor. Pine and Jones Sts. 



Furnished 
House 
For 
Sale. 



Magnificent marine view, fine garden, large yard; 45x120 
feet; well furnished; 8 rooms and bath; billiard table; 
modern improvements; convenient to two cable lines; 
For further particulars see owner at 



606 MERCHANT ST. 



Go to the 

"NEW 



LOUVRE 



8-14 OTARRELL ST. 



We have removed the " Louvre " from the old basement un- 
der the Phelan Building, and now occupy the finest quar- 
ters above ground in the city . 
RUDOLPH HAGEN. FELIX EISELE, Proprietors. 

HENRY N. CLEMENT, 

Attorr\ey-at- Law, 

Rooms 13 and 14, fourth floor, Mills Building, S. F. Telephone No. 855. 

Dr. F. C. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Soiences Building, 819 Market street 



Perrier-Jouet & Co 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 



For sale by all first-class Wine 
Merchants and Grocers 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 123 California St 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1895. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

(Pacific System.) 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

Leave. \ From July 16, 1895. | Arrive 

*o:30 a San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 9:15 A 

7:00a Atlantic Express, Ogdenand East 10:50P 
7 :00 A Benicia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, and Redding, via Davis 7:15 P 
7:30 A Martinez. San Ramon, Napa. Cal- 
ls tuga, and Santa Rosa — 6:15 P 

7 :30 A San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 10:15 a 

8:30a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Red 

Blufl, and Oroville 4 :15 p 

♦8:30 A Peters and Milton *7:15P 

9:00 a San Leandro Haywards and Way 

Stations 11:45 A 

9:00 a New Orleans Express, Raymond, 
(for Yosemite). Santa Barbara, 
Los Angeles, Deming, El Paso, 

New Orleans and East 10:45 a 

9:00 a Martinez and Stockton 10:45 a 

10:00 a San Leandro, Haywards, Niles... 1:45 P 
12:00m San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 2:45p 

1:00 p Niles, San Jose and Livermore. . . 8:45 a 

*1 :00 p SacrameDto River steamers *9:00p 

tl :30 P Port Costa and Way Stations f7 :45 P 

3:00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 5:45 p 

4 :'0 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 6 :45 P 

4:00p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano and 

Santa Rosa 9 :15 A 

4:00 P Benicia, Esparto, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, Marysville, 

Oroville, and Sacramento 10:45a 

5:00 P Niles, San Jose, Livermore and 

Stockton 7 :15 p 

5:30 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 8:45 P 

5:30 p Los Angeles Express, Fresno. 
Raymond (for Yosemite), Bakers- 
Held, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles 4:45 p 
5 :30 p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojave and East 10:45a 

6:00 P European mail, Ogdenand East. . 9:15 A 
6:00 p Haywards, Niles and San Jose. . . 7:45 a 

I? :00 p Vallejo t? :45 p 

7:00 p Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and East 10:45 A 

7:0(t p San Leandro, Havwards and Way 

Stations 10:50P 

9:00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations ttl2:00 A 

tfll :15 P San Leandro, Haywards and 

Way Stations *7 : 15 A 

Santa Chdz Division (Narrow Gauge). 
t7:45A Sunday excursion for Newark. San 
Jose, Los Gatos, Felton, Santa 

Cruz 18:05P 

8:15 A Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, BoulderCreek, Santa Cruz 

and way stations. 5:50 P 

•2:15 P Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
New Almaden, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 

way stations *11:20a 

4:45 p Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos 9:50 A 

C oast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 
*6:45a San Jose, jjNew Almaden and way 

stations *1 :45 p 

17:30 A Sunday Excursion for San Jose. 
Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove, and 

principal way stations $8:35 P 

8:15 a San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
Luis Obispo, Guadalupe and prin- 
cipal waystations 7:05p 

J9 :47 a Palo Alto and way stations Jl :45 p 

10:40 a San Jose and waystations 5:do p 

11 :45 a Palo Alto and way stations 3:30 p 

♦2:30 pSau Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove *10:40 A 

*3:30p San Jose and principal way sta- 
tions 9 :47 A 

*4 :30 p Sau Jose and Way Stations *8 :06 A 

5:30 p San Jose and way stations *8:48 a 

6:30p San Jose and way stations 6:35 A 

*11:30p San Jose and way stations *7:45p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street 
(Slip 8). 

♦7:00. 8:00, 9:00, *10:00 and 11:00 a. m., *12:30 

tl:iK), *2:0U, 3:00. *4 :00, 5:00 and *6:00p. M. 
From Oakland— Foot of Broadway. 

•6:00, *7:00. 8:00, *9:00, 10:00 and *ll :00 a.m. 

112:00, *12:30, 2:1X1, *3:00, 4:00 and *5:00 P. M. 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

^Thursdays only, JSundays only. 

t+ Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

. The PACIFIC Transfer Company will call for 
and check baggage from hotels and residences 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 



WISE AND OTHERWISE. 

A loving heart incloses within itself an un- 
failing and eternal Eden.— Richter. 

One man's word is no man's word; we 
should quietly hear both sides.— Goethe. 

A man has generally the good or ill qual- 
ities which he attributes to mankind.— 
Shenstone. 

Scoff not at the natural defects of any O, 
it is cruel to beat a cripple with his own 
crutches.— Fuller. 

When will love die? Not till the stars die ; 
not till the heavens fall; love will outlast 
them all. — Anon. 

It is always safe to learn, even from our 
enemies ; seldom safe to venture to instruct 
our friends.— Colton. 

Nothing is so good for an ignorant man as 
silence; and if he was sensible of this he 
would not be ignorant.— Saadi. 

Free people, remember this maxim: We 
may acquire liberty, but it is never recov- 
ered if it is once lost.— Rousseau. 

The wi s e are instructed by reason, ordi- 
nary minds by experience, the stupid by 
necessity, andbrutes by instinct.— Cicero. 

There is a sort of natural instinct of hu- 
man dignity in the heart of man which 
steels his very nerves not to bend beneath 
the heavy blows of a great adversity. The 
palm tree grows best beneath a ponderous 
weight, even so the character of man. — 
Kossuth. 

Oakland, San Leandro & ttauwards 
tleGtric Railway. 

Connects with the broad gauge local at Fruit- 
vale every half hour for San Leandro. San 
Lorenzo, and Haywards. 

Classic and popular music every Sunday from 11 
a. m. to 5 p. m. at Haywards Park. 

The Club-house cuisine excellent. 



ft. BUSWELL, 



Bookbinder, Paper-Ruler, Printe 
and Blank Book Manufacturer. 



516 Commercial St., S. F. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a. m., July 5, 9, 19, 24; August 
3,8, 18; Septembers 17. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound ports, July 5, 9, 14, 
19, 24, 29, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka, Areata, and Field's Landing 
(Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pomona," every Tues- 
day at 2 P. M. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
Julv 4,8.12. 16, 20, 24, 28, and every fourth day 
thereafter at 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles), and Newport, July 2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 
30. and every fourth day thereafter, at 1 1 a. m. 

Steamer "Pomona," Saturday to Monday ex- 
cursion to Santa Cruz and Monterey, leaves 
Broadway Wharf 1, Saturday, 4 p. m. 

ForEnsenada, San Jose del Cabo, Mazatlan, 
La Paz. Altata, and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer 
"Willamette Valley." 10 a.m., 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco, 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Coolgardie gold-fields , 
(Freemantle) Australia, 
8330 first class, $110 steer- 
age. Lowest rates to Cape- 
town, S. Africa. 

O. S. S. Co.'s steamers 
sail: 

For HONOLULU, S. S. 
"AUSTRALIA." 
August 3d, at 10 a. m. 
For HONOLULU, APIA, 
AUCKLAND, and SYD- 
NEY, S. S. MARIPOSA, 
„„ Aug. 22nd, at 2 P. M. 

SPECIAL PARTIES-Reduced special rates 
for parties August 3d and 27th (Cook's Party 
August 3d ) 

For passage apply 10 138 Montgomery street. 
For freight apply to 327 Market street. 
J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., General Agts. 




SAN FRANCISCO AND NOHTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

Tiburon Ferry— Foot of Market Street. 
SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:40, 9:20, 11:00 A m; 12:35,3:50 
5:10, 6:30 P M. Thursdays— Extra trip at 
11:30 p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 
and 11:30 p m. 

SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:30, ll:00A m; 1:30. 3:30, 5:00, 
6:20 pm. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:25, 7:55, 9:30, 11:10 am; 12:45, 
3:40,5:10 pm. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:55 
and 6:35 p m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 am; 1:40,3:40,5:00, 
6:25 PM. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 
same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 
Week 1 



I In Effect 
I Nov. 1, 1894. 



Days. 1 



Sundays. 



Desti'tion. 



7:40am 
3:30 pm 
5:10 pm 



8:00am 
9:30 am 
5:00pm 



Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 











3:30 PM 


8:00a m 



Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyserville, 

Cloverdale. 



Arrive in S. F. 
Sundays. 



10:40 am 
6-05 pm 
7:30 pm 



Week 
Days. 



8:50am 
10:30am 
6:15pm 



7:40 AM) 
3:30pm| 



7:40a Ml 
3:30pm| 



I Pieta. Hop- I 
lland, Ukiah.[ 



8:00 am Guerneville 7:30 pm 



7:40 AMI 8:00AM 
5:10pm| 5:00pm i 



Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 



7:40am| 8:00am I 
3:30pm| 5:00pm 



Sebastopol. 



110:40am 

I 6:05 pm 

10:40am 

6:05 pm 



10:30 am 
6:15pm 



10:40am 
6:05 pm 



8:50am 
15 PM 



10:30AM 
6:15pm 



Stages connect at San Rafael for Bolinas. 

Stages connect at Geyserville for Skaggs 
Springs. 

Stages connect at Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Stages connect at Pieta for Highland Springs, 
Kelsey ville, Soda Bay, and Lakeport. 

Stages connect at Hopland for Lakeport and 
Bartlett Springs. 

Stages connect at Uklah for Vichy Springs, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Upper Lake, 
Booneville, Greenwood, Orr's Hot Springs, Men- 
docino City, Fort Bragg, Usal, Westport, Lay- 
tonville, Willitts, Capella, Porno, Potter Valley, 
John Day's, Lierley's, Gravelly Valley. Harris. 
Blocksburg, Bridgeville, Hydesville, and Eureka 

Saturday- to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle 
Building. 

H. C. WHITING, R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Passenger Agent. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. 

SAILINGS— At Noon. 

From Company's wharf, First and BrannanSts. 

S. S. "San Bias," July 29, 1895. 
S. S. "San Juan," August 8, 1895. 
S. S. "Colon," August 19, 1895. 
S. S. "San Jose." August 28, 1895. 
Japan and China Line for Yokohama and 
Hongkong. 
Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 
Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 
India, etc. 
SAILINGS at 3 P. M. 
S. S, '"City of Peking," via Honolulu, August 3. 
S. S. "China," August 13, 1895. 
S. S. "Peru," September 3, 1895. 
S. S. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Sept 21 , 1895. 
Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the Company's 
office, No. 425 Market street. 

ALEXANDER CENTER. 
General Agent. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

For Japan and China. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 P M, for YOKOHAMA and 
HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
steamers for SHANGHAI. 

Belgic Saturday, August 24, 1895 

Coptic (via Honolulu).. Thursday, Sept. 12, 1895 
Gaelic Tuesday. October l, 1895 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's 
office, No. 425 Market street, corner First. 

D. D. STUBBS, Secretary. 






Annual .Suliim/ifi'im, ti.OO. 




1 NE^iiijiaCbrER 




Vol. LI. 



SAN FBAKclsco. SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1S95. 



Number 5. 



Printed ami /• FliM HARRIOTT, 

PoiloJKev at ' 
Tkt nfir, of Ihr SK»s LBTTl 

Huil'lina. .*>•*- 'in i. whin information mop 

"Ir.rlinuiir ■ 

COMMISSIONER Gunst has come back full of police 
suggestions, among which is one of more thau touch- 
ing interest. The suave officer who leads the unprotected 
females over the dangerous crossings must in future wear 
white cotton gloves to prevent the perspiration from his 
hands soiling the delicate silks and velvets under his pro- 
teetion. Bravo. Commissioner Gunst ! 



IT has been computed that the consumption of oats has 
been reduced by one hundred millions of bushels, owing 

to the substitution of electricity for horses on street cars 
and the popularity of the bicycle. This means a revolution 
of an interesting nature. It means that while those who deal 
in horses and raise oats are seriously affected, the coal 
men. the builders of electrical machinery, and the manu- 
facturers of bicycles are benefited, and in this way the 
volume of trade is not lessened. It is merely distributed 
among other classes and in other quarters. 

CITY Attorney Creswell has done good service in call- 
ing general attention to the need of a permanent roof 
for the City Hall. The present roof is of a temporary 
character,' and in constant danger from fire. The condi- 
tion of the premises, as described by Mr. Creswell, is little 
short of alarming. ' Not only is the upper part of the 
building in constant danger, but the records in the office 
of the County Clerk are also at all times threatened with 
destruction. It is folly to allow such a state of affairs to 
continue for a day longer than it can be helped. 

IF tbe "Irish-Americans" who are "organizing" in this 
city, and generally over the country, to "free Ireland 
by force of arms," do not learn a lesson from the action of 
our Government in preventing fillibustering expeditions 
leaving our shores, then they are either more stupid or 
dishonest than we give them credit for. Talk is cheap in 
this country. It is the escape valve for many a political 
mountebank, but when it comes to acts, or any overt work 
that would be against the law, then Uncle Sam will bring 
that iron hand in the velvet glove down so heavy that 
something will have to give way. And this does not apply 
to "Irish-Americans" any more than it applies to "Cuban- 
Americans," "Polish-Americans," " Hungarian- Ameri- 
cans," or any other "Americans" who live under the pro- 
tection of our flag, to which all citizens owe their first 
allegiance. 

THERE are occasions when politics should not be al- 
lowed to interfere, with the selection of men for cer- 
tain positions of trust and responsibility, more especially 
when efficiency can only be expected from a superior edu- 
cation, backed by experience. Take, for instance, the 
position ef Superintendent of the City and County Hospi- 
tal, now so ably tilled bv Dr. Titus. His removal at present 
by the exercise of political influence, would be a misfortune 
for the taxpayers generally. The Board of Health should 
retain this very efficient and deservedly popular official. 
His years of experience render him much more fitted for 
the position than some new man, who would have to begin 
the study of a life-time, before he could possibly attain the 
knowledge necessary to manage this great and worthy in- 
stitution with the sagacity which, under Dr. Titus, has 
made it so useful to the community. 



IT -.-ems almost useless t<> presume that anything in the 
way of statuary were necessary to emphasize the pub- 
lic sen ices and noble deeds ol Leland Stanford to embalm 
his memory in the hearts of the people of the Pacific ('nasi. 
but a grateful artist has presented the officers of the Uni- 
versity at Palo Alto with a handsome bust to adorn the 
museum. It is a splendid production of the bust form and 
bronze features of the founder of the great University, 
and the artist's name is Rupert Schtnid. 

SMEIIR'AN importers of European oranges lost heavily 
this year, and they are now looking to the West Indies 
as a source of supply to supplement the output from Cali- 
fornia and Florida. They hope now to crowd out the 
Sicilian oranges altogether, which come here under un- 
favorable circumstances, and which are said to be only 
given a market because the California and Florida fruit is 
not sufficient for the demand. The difficulty about the 
West India fruit has been theretofore, that it has not come 
to this country in a sufficiently attractive shape, but now 
practical men are to take charge of the packing, and they 
expect to make a change for the better. 

THE production of petroleum in the city of Los Angeles 
is truly remarkable. Wells in the hill district of the 
city are yielding a total of 2,500 gallons a day. The daily 
consumption in the city, for fuel purposes, is 1,500 gallons 
a day. And this represents a great saving, as compared 
with the expense of coal, which is high priced in all parts 
of Southern California. Some idea of what this oil pro- 
duction means for Los Angeles may be gathered from the 
fact that before the oil development a poor quality of New 
Mexico coal retailed there at $11 a ton. There is at pre- 
sent a surplus oil production of a thousand gallons a day, 
and it is proposed to ship this to San Francisco, for use as 
fuel by manufacturing establishments. An oil discovery 
in Northern California would be a fine thing for this part 
of the State. 

THE Examiner makes the careless statement that in 
adopting a certain constitutional amendment last 
November the voters believed that "it forbade aliens here- 
after to acquire any title to lands in California." Seeing 
that the amendment, on its face, merely authorized the 
Legislature to make laws respecting alien ownership of 
land in this State, it is difficult to see how any intelligent 
voter could have misunderstood it. The truth is that 
the adoption of the amendment leaves the rights of aliens 
just the same as before. The legislature should be very 
careful in exercising the power thus conferred, bearing in 
mind that alien capital is very useful in developing our 
mines and establishing manufacturing industries. There 
may be need, however, of restricting or forbidding alien 
ownership of agricultural lands. 

THE Merchants and Manufacturers' Association do not 
propose to permit any poaching on the industrial in- 
terests of the Pacific Coast by Eastern drummers and so- 
licitors for mechanical work if they can prevent it. They 
issued a circular a few days ago warning the printers 
that the Eastern "calendar man " was here, as usual, pre- 
pared to secure his orders for this class of work, which, as 
a rule, has always been done by Eastern publishing houses. 
This work can be done just as well in San Francisco and 
the money kept at home, provided the insurance firms and 
manufacturers who deal in this line will have the same con- 
sideration for the California printer that they have for the 
Eastern man in the time in which to perform the work 
and the quantity of the order. The facilities are just as 
good, and they can compete in price, quality, and merit. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1895. 



THE DERELICTION OF THE PRESS. 

THE elaborate reports which the daily papers are giving 
of the Durrant case invite attention to the ethics of 
journalism. The New York Sun, in a recent plausible article, 
argues that the public will have the news, whether it makes 
for morality or not, and adds that a newspaper editor who 
undertook to exercise a censorship over the chronicle of 
passing events would lose his readers, and would pave the 
way for a government censorship of the press such as they 
have in France and Japan. This is a question in which 
sound principle lies between two extremes. It is true 
that in this country newspaper readers would not suffer 
the news of the day to be so pruned or excised at the 
whim of an editor that the reader was left in ignorance of 
passing events which are topics of general conversation. 
For instance, there was the other day an earthquake in 
Mexico which nearly destroyed a church and a theatre, 
and caused considerable loss of life; the newspapers pub- 
lished at the City of Mexico were forbidden to allude to the 
subject, and except in the locality where the earthquake 
was actually felt, people have never heard of the occur- 
rence. Neither the American press nor the American 
people would endure such interference, with the spread of 
information, as that. But, on the other hand, it will not be 
denied by any candid journalist that much is published by 
our papers for which there is no public craving, and which 
add nothing whatever to public knowledge or information. 
Nothing is gained by reports of disgusting crimes, or 
of offences against decency or good behavior, or of assem- 
blages of individuals who are ignorant or evil-minded. No 
one would be the loser if such items of intelligence, were 
suppressed by a general concensus among editors. Even 
this bad habit is not the head of the offending of our papers. 
Speaking generally the press of this coast proposes not to 
publish the opinions of its editors, or of well-informed men 
whom they may call into council, but the opinions which 
are entertained by the masses, that is to say, the least in- 
telligent portion of the community. In private the editors 
confess that they do not have the brutal prejudice against 
the Chinese which is reflected in their columns, they are 
far too well informed to believe many things which they 
print, and they print them only because they imagine that 
such stuff is the faith of the masses. That is to say, the 
opinions of the San Francisco dailies are the opinions of 
the most stupid, the most ignorant, the most narrow- 
minded members of the community. The effect is two-fold. 
It fills outsiders with amazement that so bright a com- 
munity as this should support such backward and be- 
nighted journals. And the reiteration in the press of the 
errors and the stupidities of the sandlot confirms the ignor- 
ant class in its ignorance, and disseminates error among 
the rising generation. Our young men are what the news- 
papers make them. If they read in the morning paper 
that economical science is a delusion, and that brutality is 
proof of spirit, they ripen in their manhood into objects of 
contempt and derision. To make them so. seems to be the 
object of some of our most widely circulated organs of 
opinion. 

Should Insane Not long ago public attention was directed 
Murderers to tin' case of a lunatic who, having com- 

Be Executed ? mi t ted murder, was sent to Stockton and 
was pardoned out — having been supposed 
to have recovered his reason — by Governor Markham. It 
was said that if a mistake had been made, and the lunatic 
had not fully recovered, another murderer had been let 
loose to take human life. A similar case is reported 
in the Paris D6bats by the eminent physician, Darem- 
berg. A young man whom he had employed in his office 
suddenly went mad, and killed a neighbor in cold blood. He 
was sentenced to an asylum ; there he seemed to recover 
bis sanity, and after a period of two or three years was 
liberated. Dr. Daremberg re-employed him, and one day 
sent him to a library with a manuscript. Hearing a noise 
in the street, the doctor went down stairs, and found ;i 
dead man on the sidewalk, whom the lunatic had just killed. 
He was re-apprehended and sent back to the asylum. 
where at a convenient opportunity, after a lapse of ten 
years, he killed the director. His case goes to show that 
there is a form of homicidal mania which is incurable, 
though the sufferer can conceal the symptoms of the dis- 



ease for years. On a review of the facts, Dr. Daremberg 
gives it as his opinion that "a criminally insane person is 
a wild animal, who should be destroyed." A very similar 
remark was lately made by Dr. Forbes Winslow, the emi- 
nent London alienist. He said that when he was in the 
presence of a lunatic who had committed a crime of violence 
he never took his eye off him for a moment. A lunatic 
escapes the gallows by pleading irresponsibility for his 
actions. But this very idiosyncrasy makes him the more 
dangerous. He takes life not for gain or revenge, but 
simply in obedience to an uncontrollable impulse which he 
cannot account for, and, having this impulse, he is often 
apparently quite sane — indeed, is endowed with a cunning 
which few sane persons possess. In sending such a man 
to an asylum as we do, we merely nurse him for the com- 
mission of further murders. He may become, to all ap- 
pearances, so sane that it seems cruel to keep him in con- 
finement, and a short-sighted executive may liberate him. 
Or he may, by the exercise of the madman's cunning, con- 
trive his escape. In either ease a man is sent adrift into 
tin' world with the instinct of murder in his heart, and 
murder of the most formidable kind, because it is unpro- 
voked and purposeless. Dr. Forbes Winslow states, in 
the paper above mentioned, that a lunatic who has once 
tasted blood will almost certainly cherish the taste to his 
death, and will gratify it if he can. He may become sane 
on every point but that one. Years may pass. In the 
case of the Frenchman reported by Dr. Daremberg, ten 
years elapsed between the murder of the stranger in the 
street and that of the asylum director. It would seem 
that the time has come to consider whether, in any case, 
insanity should be regarded as an excuse for murder. 
There are plenty of unfortunates in our asylums who are 
entitled to the care and shelter they get there; those in- 
stitutions should surely not be used as nurseries for assas- 
sins, whether they are responsible or irresponsible. 

Literature and This is the season when certain printed 
the matter which we cannot help suspecting 

Thermometer, is weak, vulgar and trashy, is palmed 
off upon us on the ground that it is good 
"summer reading," and will serve to while away the 
drowsy hours as we loll in a hammock or lie prone on the 
sands of the sea-shore. Yet why should a man who is re- 
clining in the open air of heaven be willing to put up with 
poorer reading than a man sitting in a parlor-chair? and 
why should a book which is dull and uninteresting when 
the thermometer stands at 40 become attractive when 
the mercury registers 80 ? Does the interest of a book 
depend upon the temperature of the air, and is a volume 
that one would not look at at Christmas time when the 
trees have shed their leaves to be read with pleasure under 
a June sun when the roses are blooming ? Does our stand- 
ard of literary taste go up as the thermometer falls, and 
go down as it rises ? Is Fahrenheit the Autocrat among 
literary critics';' Is it necessary that a book should be 
read amid the scenes that it describes, and at the season 
of the year depicted in its pages ? Yet we are not sure 
that the "summer book " always treats of the open air and 
the summer girl; that its heroine always has a tanned 
face, and wears knickerbockers; perhaps she is sometimes 
robed in filmy tulle and wears a complexion procured out of 
a box. Where should Lord Dufferin's "Letters from High 
Latitudes" be read ? at the Equator or as near the North 
Pole as possible? Since our midsummer is the antipo- 
dean's midwinter, must the book which is read by the New 
Englander in June be perused by the New Zealander in 
January ? This notion that literary taste varies accord- 
ing to the latitude or altitude of the reader is certainly a 
strange one; and we cannot help thinking that the "sum 
mer book" is a weak, flimsy, trashy product, which peo- 
ple may perchance be induced to buy, but which it is 
hardly supposed they will make any serious attempt to 
read. A book worthy to engage, a sensible man's atten- 
tion in summer should be a good one in winter, too; the 
fashion in books does not change with the seasons, like the 
style of women's hats and skirts. If a book describes with 
literary skill brooks, woods, and mountains lighted by the 
brilliance of a summer sun, it will be pleasant to read it 
when the rain is falling and the cold winds are whistling 
outside. Once a good book always a good book; once a 
poor one always a poor one. 



August 3, 1895. 



[•RAM \VS LETTER. 



Tm Wiy Out ol Tin n Hani) ami Heir, 

The .l><'r~. has 

Silver Muddle, done much t.. sharpen public Interest 

in * ■ •». Bui it is doubt- 

ful whether it has lefl the people much enlightened. Of 

n day tn day, through 
the pi . everybody had taken sides at the outset 

elyunew idea was ■ in the war of words, 

Students of finance must have noted thai the debate was 
little more than a thrashing over of Btraw thai had often 
been beaten before. Harvey's argument was bo much 
mixed up with claptrap, and obvious appeals to the 
passions ami prejudices of tin- multitude, thai it was often 
hard to tell when, tin- buncombe Ih-s.mii and the farts and 

disappeared. And as for Horr, his intemperate and 
Injudicious attacks upon the advocates and supporters of 
free silver did his cause more harm than his reasoning 
could do good. It was. of course, provoking to him to 
have Harvey get nearly all the applause. And towards 
the end of the discussion the champion of the gold stand- 
ard was himself tempted to indulge in "gallery play," in 
order to win a little hand-clapping. The curious thing 
about the discussion was that the must vital point of the 
whole subject received the least attention. The real issue 
before the public is whether tin- United States alone may 
safely undertake the experiment of the free coinage of 
silver. But there was vastly more said about the de- 
monetization of silver in 1ST:', than about the actual ques- 
tion of the day. Whether the abandonment of the silver 
dollar as standard money in 1878 was a crime, accident or 
mistake, or whether it was necessary, judicious and in- 
evitable, makes little practical difference now. The point 
for the people to-day is whether it would profit them to 
drive out all the gold from circulation, in order to have the 
privilege of turning silver bullion into silver dollars at the 
mints of the United States. And the people who work 
for wages and salaries in this country must be more dull 
than is commonly supposed if they can be induced to be- 
lieve that under free coinage a silver dollar would have 
the same purchasing power that it has now. In that 
event an3'body could buy silver bullion enough, for a hun- 
dred dollars in gold, to make two hundred silver dollars 
when coined at the mint. Unquestionably, there is an 
overwhelming sentiment in this country in favor of bime- 
tallism, but the people who are willing to abandon the 
gold standard for the single standard of silver are in a 
small and decreasing minority. The logic of the situation 
is that we must have bimetallism is we can get it through 
an international agreement. And our best means to at- 
tain that boon is through a demonstration of our ability to 
do without it until foreign nations see fit to move in the 
matter. But so long as they hope to get our gold in ex- 
change for the silver they have in store, they will hold out 
against international bimetallism. Nothing would suit the 
governments of Europe better than to have the United 
States open her mints to silver, That would be the 
signal for a general dump of the white metal upon our 
shores. 

Machine Politics The revolt in the Republican party in 
i n Pennsylvania is the natural culmination 

Pennsylvania. of machine politics. Matt Quay, upon 
whose shoulders the mantle of the late 
Senator Cameron fell, has provoked an opposition to his 
rule which bids fair to repeat the Pattison episode. In the 
combination which proposes to down him, the public is 
amused to perceive the Boss of Alleghany County lying 
down cheek by jowl with the truly pious John Wanamaker 
in a cradle which is rocked by Standard oil. Quay faces 
the foe with the intrepidity born of frequent success, and 
though he is alone, he cries, as he waves the tattered ban- 
ner of boodle : 

" Come one, come all — 
This rock shall fly 
From its firm base 
As soon as I. 

To understand the situation the observer must remember 
that from time immemorial there has been but one principle 
in Peimsylvanian politics, to wit : the maintenance of the 
high protective system by which the rest of the country 
has been taxed for the benefit of the Keystone State. Half 
a century ago, the ablest statesman whom Pennsylvania 



ever prodlX M Dallas, was burned in efflgy ill 

his own State for giving his casting vote in the Senate in 
favor of the Revenue Tu riff of I8&. In I860, when the 
Republican convention met at Chicago, it became evident 
at the start that Pennsylvania held the balance of power 
and that Simon Cameron's choice would lie the nominee of 
the convention. Cameron was a typical Pennsylvania^, 
with the tenacious instincts of his Scotch ancestry, Ho 
offered the vote of his State to the candidate who would 
promise the largest measure of protection to Pennsylvania's 

products, and Lincoln, who hail in early youth Imbibed the 
virus of protectionism with other Whig poisons, carried oil 

the prize. With the war came the saturnalia of protection ; 
it has been said thai Pennsylvania robbed the country at 
large in thedecadeof I860 70 of a sum equal to the national 
debt. Por form's sake the old party distinctions were 
kept up, but so long as candidates were sound on the tariff 
question, no question was asked whether they were Trojan 
or Tyrian. Randal, the Democrat, who served a term as 
Speaker of the House, was elected and re-elected from a 
Republican district because on the tariff he was sound, 
according to the Pennsylvania standard. Now these pro- 
tectionists have fallen out over the division of the boodle, 
and it looks as though there was a chance of honest men 
getting their dues. It is darkly whispered that the more 
intelligent Republicans of the State, men who have suc- 
cessfully mastered the three Rs, are actually muttering 
under their breath that protection does not pay, upon 
which Quay growls : "If any man hauls down the protec- 
tionist flag, shoot him on the spot." 

Will Justice Ross Well-informed persons, enjoying the 
be confidence of Justices of the United 

Reversed ? States Supreme Court, now whisper 

with a smirk and a shrug that the 
court will not sustain Judge Ross's decision on the irriga- 
tion bond question. When that decision was rendered, its 
alarming feature was that it was supposed to be concurred 
in by Justice Field, whose opinion on matters pertaining to 
California generally sways the court. But Justice Field 
now states that he not only did not inspire Judge Ross's 
opinion, but never heard the points raised in the case. His 
mind is a blank on the Wright law, and he does not know 
whether it is constitutional or not. There is thus a pros- 
pect that Ross may be reversed, and the bonds issued un- 
der the law pronounced valid. It is earnestly to be hoped 
that this may be the case. Eight millions of bonds have 
been sold to England and Switzerland, and though the rule 
of caveat emptor always applies in such cases, it will be a 
very unfortunate thing if these buyers have an excuse for 
saying that they paid their money on the faith of Califor- 
nian honor, and that, so far as they are concerned, the de- 
cision is a pure robbery. The State could afford to pay a 
large sum of money rather than expose itself to such an 
imputation, ungrounded though it would be. In the ordi- 
nary course of events, enormous sums will have to be spent, 
sooner or later, in placing water on our arid lands. It has 
been reckoned that the Colorado desert alone will consume 
twenty millions. It will be a grievous detriment if the 
money markets of the world are closed to irrigation en- 
terprises in this State, and we are forced to rely upon 
home capital for the development of our agricultural lands. 
On the law of the decision it would not be seemly for a 
newspaper to express an opinion. Whether irrigation is 
or is not a public use it is for men learned in the law to de- 
termine. To many outsiders it seems that when water is 
an essential prerequisite to cultivation, and all who need it 
can obtain it on application to the officials of the district, 
the works which supply it are as much public works as a 
highway or a railroad. But questions of such ricety must 
be decided by those whose business it is to interpret 
statutes and covenants. Nor is it fitting to inquire how 
the opinions of the Supreme Court can possibly be known 
before-hand. It is a fact that they often are ; when large 
sums of money depend on a judgment of the court Wall 
street almost always knows how the judgment will go. 
Not that the Justices are necessarily leaky, much less that 
they are influenced by corrupt agencies, but lawyers who 
have practiced for years before the Supreme Court know 
the bent of each Justice's mind, and can form a shrewd 
guess — often amounting to a quasi-certainty — how a given 
set of facts will strike him. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1895. 



The Career The death of Simon Wormser recalls 
of scenes in a career which, without being 

Simon Wormser. conspicuous, was very interesting. Like 
the Seligmans, the Wormsers, who came 
to California in the early days to seek their fortunes, began 
life as dealers in ready-made clothing, first in Sacramento 
anu then in this city, and culminated as bankers with large 
capital in the metropolis of the East. They enjoyed a high 
reputation for probity and sagacity, and soon increased 
the fortune they took to New York. For many years the 
Board member of the firm was Isidore, abroad-shouldered, 
smiling Israelite, who always had a pleasant word for 
every one. On the New York Stock Exchange the boys 
are fond of practical jokes and horse-play at the expense 
of new members, and this easy-tempered giant from Cali- 
fornia seemed a good butt. He saw his new hat smashed 
over his eyes and used as a footk-ball, and he laughed as 
loudly as any of his assailants. He was pushed by a rush 
of the buvs against a pillar till his bones rattled. Still he 
laughed. Some one tore his coat sleeve and his cuff: still 
he laughed. But, with a slow, ponderous movement, he 
backed up against a wall. The boys determined to dislodge 
him, and formed what foot-ballers call a wedge. An omin- 
ous light came into his eye, and suddenly, as the point of 
the wedge drew near, he spread out his tremendous arms 
with irresistible force, and scattered the boys to right and 
left as if they had been wooden soldiers. They thought 
they had struck a cyclone. After that he was quite a 
favorite. One day an old apple woman who kept a stand at 
the Exchange door had the cheek to ask him to watch her 
stand while she mailed a letter. " Certainly, ma'am," 
said the financier, taking a seat on her stool. Then in a 
voice of surprising power he shouted: "Apples! apples! 
which of you boys wants an apple ? " The boys entered 
into the spirit of the joke and crowded around the stand, 
tendering quarters, and half-dollars, and dollars. Old Isi- 
dore took the money gravely, and thrust it into the drawer 
as it came, remarking grimly, " Dere is no change, boys. 
Dis bank has suspended on small change." The old woman 
reaped a harvest that day. and always declared that the 
fat Jew from California was the smartest member of the 
Exhange. 

The Damage Suit The rumors of a suit that is about to 
And The be instituted against the city and the 

Water Company. Spring Valley Water Company for 
damages, occasioned by the recent fire 
south of Market street, demands something more than a 
mere notice. Why the Spring Valley Water Company 
should be made a party in such a suit can only be a pre- 
text in the name of equity. The city is alone to blame, for 
. the Water Company has not only met every demand upon 
its resources, but has gone beyond the limit in supplying 
■ every portion of the city the law demands with an abund- 
ance of water. The economy displayed by the Boards of 
Supervisors in payment of services rendered by the Com- 
pany has been so gingerly in an effort to appease the voice 
of demagogues that it is a wonder that greater destruction 
of property has not taken place in the city. The Spring 
Valley Water Company has been prepared at all times to 
meet any demand apparent that the city required, and 
had they been met with the same liberality that they have 
displayed in enterprise, the conditions would have been 
different. There is no question but that there was a lack 
of water to meet the requirements of that occasion, as is 
usually the case where a fire amounts to a conflagration, 
but there has been no demand made upon the Spring Val- 
ley Water Company for a better service by the authori- 
ties. Such fires are rare incidents, and serve to develop 
the imperfections that exist in the various departments 
of the municipal government, and the damages are of a 
' character that are summed up in the "aotsof Providence," 
i which no human ingenuity can avert. But, coming to the 
point in this suit for damages, the Company has no part 
in it in equity. The service can only be improved by a 
I system of generous reciprocity on the part of the city au- 
1 thorities, rather than one that menaces the enterprise and 
: prosperity of such a corporation, whose every effort has 
! been to enlarge and expand its usefulness in meeting the 
growing needs of the city. This threatened suit may nave 
, the effect to arouse the city to a proper appreciation of 
! the situation. 



The Distribution The social, as well as the political 
of world of California will probably be 

Hoarded Wealth, stirred up somewhat at the escap- 
ade of H. \V. Laugenour, the bril- 
liant young Assemblyman of Yolo. He was the leader 
of the Democratic minority in the last Legislature, and 
gave promise of growing into favor as a statesman. 
He is the son of a millionaire, but was not reared in 
the lap of luxury, as is the case with rich men's sons 
usually. Coming into possession of a very handsome 
fortune on the death of his father, he surprised his for- 
mer associates by stepping to the front as a man gifted 
with a spirit of enterprise, and invested largely in promi- 
nent industries in the hope that his energy might pro- 
voke others to join him in buildiug up the city and 
locality in which he lived. Although possessed of a fair 
education his ambition got the better of his judgment, and 
his business ventures proved failures and drained him of 
his fortune. This is a brief history of the manner in which 
many large estates are distributed and the money goes back 
to infuse life into the channels of business, trade and com- 
merce. The manner of forming trusts by the more crafty 
and judicious heirs to millions has resulted in aiding the 
stringency that is now felt in the world, and it is a serious 
question as to whether people have any right to form such 
combinations to prevent the natural distribution of wealth. 
It is one way of entailment that smacks of the feudal laws 
of England, and does positive injury to the development of 
the resources of a country so burdened with wealth as the 
United States naturally is. While no one rejoices at the 
wreck of a fortune and a political ambition, such as has 
followed in the management of young Laugenour of Yolo, 
the lesson he has learned will only serve as an impetus for 
him to exert his energies more diligently to regain that 
which he has frittered away both in wealth, in social and 
in political standing. 

False Alarms A number of times each year the Ameri- 
From can heart is fired by newspaper head- 

The Press. lines such as: "Firing upon the Flag." 
"The Stars and Stripes Insulted," and so 
forth. In each instance there follows a column or two of 
particulars, setting forth a "full account" of the " out- 
rage." If these stories were to be believed, the United 
States would have cause for war with alarming frequency. 
But investigation commonly shows that the subject of the 
"outrage " was some craft engaged in smuggling or other 
violation of the laws of a friendly nation. It has been so 
with every case reported from Cuba, so far. And it is to 
be borne in mind that while the rebellion lasts in that is- 
land, the Spanish gunboats, or other vessels of war bear- 
ing the Spanish Hag will have the right to stop all mer- 
chant vessels within three miles of the shore, in order to 
ascertain whether any attempt is being made to land arms 
or mmiitions for the insurgents. The Spanish war vessels 
have precisely the same right to do this that the navy of 
the North had to intercept suspected craft within three 
miles of our coast, during the progress of our civil war. 
But the jingo spirit that is so strong in our free and un- 
fettered press will doubtless continue to break out with 
each fresh incentive of the sort mentioned. The cry to 
arms is raised so often in this way, that sober-minded peo- 
ple may be greatly at a loss, when some real casus belli 
actually occurs. There need be no fear, however-, that. 
the temper of this nation will brook any affront that 
should be resented. And no feverish headings in the news- 
papers will be needed to rouse the spirit of American 
patriotism, when occasion for its manifestation shall arise. 

IT is said that the government engineers detailed to in- 
vestigate the Nicaragua canal project have reached a 
highly favorable conclusion, and will so report to Congress 
at its next session. It is also reported that President 
Cleveland agrees with them in the matter, and that he 
will recommend favorable action by Congress, coupled 
with the condition that the rights of the peop'e of the 
United States be in every way secured, if government aid 
is to be rendered in the undertaking. The canal is the 
chief need of the Pacific, Coast, and all legitimate influ- 
ences should be used to induce Congress to take the de- 
sired action. 



August 3, 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Bowiar'i Sudden Comptroller Howler has suddenly be- 

Rite conn- a man of distinction. Pew per- 

To Greetneei. SOUS OUtsidi Washington knew at 

On ■'. this great statesman 

until a week or two ago. Hut now be is n national figure. 
His decision not to pay the sugar bounties lifted him sud- 
denly into prominent • announced his conclusion 
that the bounty law w;is unconstitutional, and Instantly 
be became famous No one had suspected that hidden 
away in the treasury department at Washington «;i> ;> 
und jurist who regarded himself as better versed in 
constitutional law than the two Houses of Congress and 
the President of the United States, acting in harmony, 
and with the Supreme Court yet to hoar from. A less 
confident man than Bowler might have hesitated, knowing 
the uncertainties of law, and in view of the fact that the 
Supreme Court is often sorely perplexed over nice points 
of constitutionality. That tribunal was nearly equally 
divided on the income tax question, but here is where 
Bowler has an advantage. He cannot be divided on any 
question. Therefore, when Bowler says a thing is law or 
not law, there is no question of whether a minority or a 
majority of his court has spoken. He always, as it were, 
sits in bank. Bowler's decision not to pay the sugar 
bounties saves the treasury about $5,000,000. And now 
that his great mind has grasped the possibilities of economy- 
and retrenchment for the treasury, through the simple 
expedient of annulling acts of Congress, there is no telling 
where he will stop. A dreadful hint has been dropped at 
Washington that he may declare bounties to steamship 
lines, passed by the last Congress, also unconstitutional. 
And it may be that the Atlanta Exposition will have to 
lose its Congressional subsidy of §100,000 because of 
Bowler's disapproval. Should he withhold money for 
pensions, there may be still more of a stir than this sugar 
decision has excited. Before long, the nation may wait in 
breathless suspense for Bowler's final action on the silver 
question. Bowler may decide to pay the national debt in 
silver dollars, and so cut loose from the traditions of the 
past. But, being a faithful follower of the Cleveland ad- 
ministration, he is more likely to " stand like a rock " for 
the gold standard, and to give the white metal a terrible 
" black eye" by declaring against the constitutionality of 
the coinage of the standard dollar. Perhaps, after all, 
Bowler's bold course in blazing his own path through the 
intricacies of constitutional law is to be attributed to the 
example of his master, Grover the First. It was King 
Grover, we must remember, who suspended an act of 
Congress in relation to the registration of Chinese. Bowler 
may reason, and justly, that he has as much right as the 
President to set aside or suspend an Act of Congress. 
Now, if the Democratic party is looking for a strong team 
to make the running in 1896, what's the matter with 
Cleveland and Bowler, or Bowler and Cleveland, which- 
ever arrangement may suit best? It may be that Bowler 
would not care to take the second place; in which case, 
Grover might well be satisfied to take it himself, with 
Bowler to lead the way to victory. 



The Right A recent decision by the Supreme Court 
of of the United States establishes the doc- 

Self-Defense. trine that a person unlawfully attacked, 
or actually menaced with serious bodily 
harm, is not obliged to retreat, but may stand his ground, 
and, if necessary, kill his adversary. This decision was 
given in a case on appeal from a Federal court in Arkan- 
sas, where a young man named Beard had been convicted 
of manslaughter and sentenced to eight years' imprison- 
ment. Beard had inflicted a fatal blow on a brother-in- 
law of his who had come upon his premises to lay claim to 
a cow, and who was about to draw a pistol. The United 
States Supreme Court found that the trial court erred in 
giving instructions to .the jury that the defendant was 
bound " to avoid danger by getting out of the way if he 
could; that the only place where he need not retreat far- 
ther was his dwelling house." For this reason the judg- 
ment was set aside and a new trial ordered. Thus our 
highest tribunal has declared that the doctrine of the old 
English common law has no force or application in this 
country. It was the requirement of the common law that 
the person assailed must retreat to the wall, even though 



in imminent danger, before he could lie excusable In taking 

the lift- of the aggressor as an act of Belf-defense. in many 

• iii-- operated as ;t reasonable and proper rule, but in 

others it worked a (.-real injustice. The OOUrtS Of 11"' 

various States have always inclined to Hie view, now af- 
firmed by our Supreme judicial authority, that on the pari 
of the person assailed there is do obligation to retreat. 
And so it appears that there is nothing either " wild or 
woolly" In the western sentiment which supports a man 
who stands his ground and shoots his assailant on the Brsl 
motion made by the latter to draw a knife or pistol. To 
the Western man this seems to be no more than a natural 
right of self-defense. It has been argued by learned coira- 

selfor the defense, in courts Of California and Nevada. 
that the man who runs away when attacked forfeits the 

reaped and esteem of the community in which he lives. 
And it is reported, though not officially, that a certain 
Nevada jurist on one occasion charged the jury that to 

call a man a of a was equivalent to an assault. 

This, however, has not generally been regarded as good 
law, even in the West, and is certainly entirely foreign to 
the common law of England. 

All over the world babies have been benefited, during the teething 
period, by Steedman's Soothing Powders. 




New importations arriving daily for the Fall 
Trade. Earliest call secures the choice. 

m TURKISH RUG GO., 

With agents in Persia, Afghanistan, Cashmere, 
Bagdad, Dagistan, Boukahara, Teheran, 
Armenia, Khiva, Kurdistan, and in all 
Rug market cities, is the only firm in 
this country offering to the puhlic quan- 
tity, quality, and low prices in all kinds 
of Oriental art goods. 

Tile TURKISH RUG GO., 

324 Sutter street. 

Also agents (or the Turkish Regie Cigarettes and Tobacco- The only and 
the best tobacco imported to this country. Try it. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 



For sale by all flrst-class Wine 
Merchants and Grocers 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 123 California St 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1895. 



MEMORIES OF OUR LATIN QUARTER. 

OUR Latin Quarter in San Francisco has singular 
branching veins which spread themselves at intervals, 
for one finds here and there continually a streak of the 
Barbary Coast. I distinguish the two, because the latter 
partakes essentially of the water front — though of course 
with a certain difference. For instance, the extraordinary 
number of great and large French and Italian restaurants 
in the district bounded by Vallejo, Stockton, Washington, 
and Montgomery streets, lend an air of foreign respecta- 
bility to certain districts which are otherwise. 

Off and on I have lived in the Latin Quarter many years, 
and have seen many odd and amusing phases of its life. 
They were varied, too, because frequently I saw the lowest 
as well as the highest side. Nowadays it is the fashion in 
society to eat spaghetti once and a while at the F'lor 
d'ltalia, or enciladas at Margherita's — all of which is "real 
romantic" and "so excitingly dangerous," as a young 
lady told me the other day. But really, to appreciate the 
place one must enjoy both its feasts and its famines. As 
this, for instance : Once I remember sharing my humble 
apartment in upper Kearny street with a young Irish 
artist named Donnelly — relative of our eminent painter, 
Joe Harrington, I believe. The lad only stopped here a 
few months, and then left for Australia under peculiar cir- 
cumstances to which I was a party. We were very hard 
up, and were dreadfully hungry, when about five o'clock in 
the afternoon, when dinner was desperately far off, we 
dropped into the Palace and glanced at the hotel register. 
Suddenly Donnelly's eyes lighted with a wild gleam. 

" Be the powers ! " he cried, "it's me own uncle from 
Dublin, Sir Duffy Quin and valet, Ireland. Me laddibuck, 
our fortune's made. Come an, come an up, an' we jinks 
the game. He's loshins of goold." 

We found Sir Duffy Quin on the first floor — a thin, deli- 
cate little bit of an old man, half undressed, and quite 
peevish because his valet had been gone an hour looking 
for missing luggage, and was not there to dress him. 
However, he welcomed his nephew cordially, and bade us 
be seated, with old-fashioned courtesy. But Donnelly 
would have none of that. 

"Oi'll dress yez mesilf!" cried he, "for yez are goin' 
out to doine with me friend and mesilf this minute ! " 

And with that, notwithstanding the old gentleman's pro- 
tests, Donnelly hustled the garments or. to him, tied his 
cravat, and bundled on the top hat. 

" Where's my purse, and watch, and chain!" cried the 
excited knight as he was hustled out by the stalwart Don- 
nelly. 

"They're on the bureau, an' all safe while ye're at din- 
ner. I'd leave a million here mesilf." And with that we 
were rushed headlong down to Pacific street. I was 
alarmed. 

"Jim!" I exclaimed, aside, '' where are you going ? " 

" Niver moind, " replied he, " it's all roight." 

And with that he whirled us into a tiny "joint," where 
to this very day you can get soup, potatoes, chops, wine, 
coffee, and salad, for ten cents. Plumping the old gentle- 
man into a wooden chair, he ordered dinner volubly. 

"It's grand, sorr ! " he exclaimed, enthusiastically. 

Well, we ate — that is, Donnelly and myself. But Sir 
Duffy Quin said his stomach was bad, and that the wine 
hurt his teeth. Sir Duffy got so figety and nervous that 
finally we were compelled out of mercy to rise. And then 
came the dilemma. 

"Just hold these chicks over till to-morrow," said Don- 
nelly, airily. 

"I'll be damned if I will!" cried the proprietor, fiercely, 
advancing around the edge of the counter with a large 
club. "You're three cursed beats, and I'm going to have 
you pulled ! You've played this on me before. Put up, 
now, quick, or I'll blow this whistle ! " 

"1 hadn't a cent, either, and stood there in dismay. For 
it was a fact, we did owe the man a dollar and twenty 
cents. 

Sir Duffy looked horribly scared. "James," he said, 
" what does the man want ? " 

"Why, uncle, he's afther thirty cents, and we have not 
got it. You see, we both left our purses at home, and he 
knows it, and wants to have us arrested." 

"Arrested! Good Heavens! And me with my new 



Australian appointment. What will people say at home ! " 

At this I sought to mollify the irate landlord, and tried 
to compromise on our leaving our keys with him for the 
night. 

"I'll not do it," he said, angrily. "That's a fake all you 
boys play. I'll take no keys." 

"What will you take, then?" 

"I'll take your waistcoats till you pay me up ! " 

Pleading was in vain, and then and there we surren- 
dered our precious vests to the monster. They were re- 
deemed next day. 

But Sir Duffy Quin hurried off at once to Australia, not 
stopping to see the Yosemite or the seals. And he carried 
Donnelly off with him. 

" It's a wicked place for you, James ! " he remarked. 

"An' shure yez are roight, sorr," replied Donnelly, giv- 
ing me a knowing wink as he walked up the steamer's 
gangway. Henry Bigelow. 

Recalled Stormy Times. 

"Well that looks natural," said the old soldier, looking at a can 
of condensed milk on the breakfast table in place of ordinary milk 
that failed on account of the storm. "It's the Gail Borden Eagle 
Brand we used during the war." 



Mothers, be sure and use " Mrs. WInslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 
children while teething. 

Warren wnite Sulphur Springs, 



VIRGINIA 



C. W. CULLEN & SON, 
Owners and Proprietors. 

Eight different waters, namely: White, Red, and 
Season of 1895 Blue Sulphur, Alum. Iron, Arsenic. Chalybeate, and 

opens June 1st. Lithia On top of the " Three Top Range " of the 

Masamitten chain of Mountains. Elevation 2100 
feet above the sea. No Mosquitoes, Gnats, or 
Malaria. 
TPPITIC' Per week, one person, $15; per month, one person, 
101 Mid* *W; two persons in one room $70. Special rates to 
parties of three or more. 
Good fishing, boating, and Bathing. Distance from 
Richmond & Danville Railroad, one mile; distanoe 
from Norfolk & Western, three miles; distance from 
Baltimore and Ohio, four miles. 

Oldest Summer Resort in the United States, Established 1734 



TH6 Stoneman House, 



YOSEMITE VALLEY. 



The only hotel in the valley supplied with all modern con- 
veniences and improvements. From the verandas of the 
Stoneman the following famous points are clearly visible: 
Eagle Peak, Yosemite Palls, Indian Canyon, Royal Arches, 
North Dome, Washington Column, Tenaya Canyon, Cloud's 
Rest, Half Dome, and Grizzly Moran and Glacier Points. 
The rates of this hotel are from $2 to $4 per day. according to 
room or European plan. The rooms are all newly furnished, 
the beds unsurpassed, the table excellent, and the entire 
management above criticism. 



J. J. COOK. Proprietor. 



Pope House 



and COTTAGES. This well-known and popular 
Resort is now open for the reception of guests. 
Separate Cottages for families. Tennis and 
Croquet. Electric Cars to the beach and baths. 



SANTA CRUZ Cal. 



VICHY SPRINGS 



MENDOCINO COUNTY. Three miles from 
© Uklah, the terminus of the S. F. and N. P. 

Railway. Only known natural electric water. 

Warm "champagne" baths. Situation, loca- 
tion, and scenery not surpassed. Terms. $12 to $14 per week. Post-office 
and telephone at springs. WILLIAM DOOLAN, Proprietor. 



Telephone, South 250. 



Gity Steam Carpet Beating 
and renovating works, 



38 and 40 Eighth Street, between Market and Miaaion Streets, 
San Franciaco, Cal. GEO. H. STEVENS, Manager. 



Align 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



LETTER FROM DEL MONTE. 

A 1. 1. Del Monte 

Bay time o but only those 

now here can form any idea ol I aw particularly charming 
the li oun Tm bustle ol a mixed 

I is absent, but an atmosphere of quiet elegance pre- 
Tho guests, for the most part, <io not cut up in 
cliques, for they all know em li other. Unquestionably the 
features of the time are the military now in camp not very 
far from the hotel, for the officers, from the handsome 
youthful General down to the most flirtatious Second Lieu- 
tenant, are all quartered at this lovely hotel, and th.u'l the 

improve the shining hour There are many guests 

here who have eome \k\~j. and baggage from San Rafael, of 

whom the prettiest are Missi - V\ iams and Kip a quar- 
tette of charming maidens it would be hard to beat at any 
watering place in the world, combining as they do beauty 
and intelligence, good breeding, and that undefinable at- 
traction styled by the French due. Needless to say. 
they are surrounded by the soldier beaux on every avail- 
able occasion. Closely contesting the honors of belleship 
are the lovely sisters. Misses Burton, whose handsome 
father. Colonel Burton, is on General Forsythe's staff. 
These young ladies are just fresh from the triumphs of a 
Washington season, and have already won scores of admir- 
ers by their beauty and grace : they are always bien mise. 
Another lady noted for exquisite taste in dress was the 
wife of Colonel Middleton (also of Forsythe's staff). A most 
charming, cultivated couple they are. They left last week 
for an Alaskan trip. 

Miss Daisy Casserley is alternately feared and admired. 
The knowledge that the young lady possesses a dot is a 
loadstone to the beaux, but her sharp, witty repartee is a 
weapon dreaded by the more youthful men of inexperience 
who here abound. Mrs. George Howard, nee Schmieden, 
and her distingui mother, are always favorite additions to 
any group on the balcony or the bath-house. 

Possibly the most petted beau of all is Dr. Harry Tevis, 
for apart from his many personal attractions, is he not the 
son of his father ? And that ensures him the unqualified 
approbation of the careful mammas. So that when Dr. 
Tevis suggests a moonlight saunter or a rattling drive he 
always receives an immediate assent and holds his own 
bravely with the "sojers." Charley Baldwin cannot be 
said to be as true to Del Monte as of yore, <; She who must 
be obeyed" having apparently a potent influence in draw- 
ing him to B'lingham. The young widower, Winn, is muchly 
in demand. The girls seem to feel he is a safe person to 
lavish smiles upon, but who knows ? To be sure, he's 
away from the family, and every one knows the old adage, 
""When the cat is away," etc. The women are hoping that 
Colonel Crocker will come down, but wary Fred is not easy 
of capture. Portly Hugh Tevis is not so anxiously looked 
for, as his allegiance to a certain pair of bright eyes is 
well known. It is great fun after breakfast to watch the 
pairing, so to speak, for the morning's engagement. Some- 
times by a slip the wrong couples start for the tanks or 
the tennis court, but in such cases the late afternoon gen- 
erally sees things righted, and by the time dinner is over 
and people begin to get ready for the evening, everything 
is harmoniously arranged to the satisfaction of all 
parties. 

There is a tall Eastern chap here who has caused a good 
deal of merriment by his ultraisms, and an Anglo-maniac 
who out-Herods Herod in that line. This is unquestion- 
ably the dolce fur niente period — when buttons abound and 
pretty girls have plenty of beaux. With the middle of the 
month will come the influx of the swim from Castle Crags 
and San Rafael — the Crockers, Will and George and their 
families, the B'lingamites, the Tevis-Sharon contingent, in 
all its effulgence, etc. 

The arrival of the Hobarts has created quite a ripple of 
excitement. Wealth is such a power, and no one can deny 
that these fortunate young possessors of it know how to 
spend their coin royally, giving lots of pleasure to others as 
well as to themselves, and that is what can't be said of any 
of our other exceptionally rich folk. Why some girl with 
a pretty face don't try to capture Walter Hobart I can't 
understand. Of course it goes without saying that many 
girls do enter the lists of competitors for the young man's 
fancy, but what I mean is a persistent attack — a steady 



determination to bring down the bird, which the California 

girl is oft-times endow, , I with. 

It was funny yesterday at dinner to hear a pretty young 
matron snlfj with scorn when asked if she intended running 
up for the Belveden The ideal" was what she 

said, but it told wonders. Evidently Belvedere and its 
followers are regarded as "quite out of our set," by the 
fashionable throng at del Monte. EarryTevis and Walter 
Bobart are great chums. Like Mrs. Fred Sharon and 
Mrs. BenryJanin, the latter as Miss .May Smith having 

been the bosom friend of Mrs. (then) Hrerkenridgc. ami (he 

friendship has existed ever since, a fart worthy of note by 
sceptics in the duration of female friendship. Moonlight 

is on now. and bowling is a favorite pastime after dinner. 

One would think the exercise at such a lame bad for the 
digestive powers, lnii the young people don't seem to fear 

it. and to see a girl make a ten strike is great Eun. Col. 
Shatter and General Forsythe are each bright particular 
stars with the girls : the latter especially devotes many 
spare hours to their pleasure, and an invitation to drive 
behind his spanking team is eagerly accepted by the pretty 
maids in turn, for he is very general in his attentions to all 
the girls. "Just wait," said Daisy, the other night, "till 
the widows get here, and then see ! " Just what sight she 
alluded to I don't pretend to say, nor what widows. How- 
ever, we have the authority of Dickens that widows are 
dangerous. After the crowd is fairly assembled I will drop 
you another screed. w. 
Del Monte, Jul,/ 30, lSOo. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 311 Sansome St. ... - San Francisco, Cal, 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE 43 and 46 Threadneedle St., London 

SIMPSON, MACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

FUERST BROS. & CO 2 and 4 Stone St., New York 



Snell Seminary. 



The Fall Term will open 
August 5, 1895, at 



®^The Merritt Place, 

Corner Fourteenth and Madison streets, Oakland, Cal., the 
residence of the late Dr. Samuel Merritt. , 

Pupils prepared for admission to any of the Universities, A 
fine corps of teachers for Advanced, Intermediate and Kinder- 
garten Departments. Send for catalogue, 



Mary E, Snell, Principal. 



1849 Jackson St 



Van Ness Youna 
Ladies Seminary 



San Francisco 



Under the ownership and direction of S. H. WILLEY, aided by a corps o 
twelve teachers. Numbers in the family limited to twenty-five. 

Next Term Opens August 1st. 



School For Boys, 



The school opens for hoarding 
and day scholars on 
AUGUST 1, 1895. 



1012 Grand Street, near San Jose Avenue, 
ALAMEDA, Cal. 



W. de JUNG, Principal. 



Miss Manson's School, 

1625 San Jose Ave., between 
Grand and Paru streets, 

Alameda, Gal. 

Boarding and day school tor girls. Next term begins Monday, August 5th 



Mills College and Seminary. 



Mills College P. O. 



Next term begins August 7, 1895. 

Write for Catalogue to 

MRS. C. T. MILLS, President. 

Alameda County, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1895. 





"We Obey No Wand but Pleasure's."— Torn Moore. 

JT FTER the final curtain has been rung 
£ \ on An Ideal Husband, and one leaves 
the theatre to again take up the thread of 
every-day life, it is hard to escape a sigh or 
two and a wish that nature might borrow a 
S little from Mr. Wilde, and make the world 
and its people half so clever as he does. Everyone is clever 
in An Ideal Husband — except the husband. So clever that 
one fights shy of small talk between the acts; it would 
sound so flat. Mr. Wilde has chosen a virtuous stor}' upon 
which to trace the piercing wit of his inimitable pen. A 
story no newer than man's conscience, but told in a fashion 
so crisply brilliant that there is scarcely a line in the play 
which will not bear memorizing. 

The severest critics of this work of Mr. Wilde's have 
found fault with the very brilliance that makes the play so 
alluring; calling the epigrammatic lines theatric, forced, 
and insincere with the naturalness that must dominate 
art. But the same men read sonnets (to say nothing of 
occasionally writing them), and delight in probing the hid- 
den depths of a Shakespearean line, or guessing at the 
vague symbolism of an Ibsen plumbing problem. There is 
not a line in An Ideal Husband that is not consistent with 
the character who utters it; nor one which retards the 
action of the play. That every other sentence is a flash of 
wit riveted in burnished English, is about as deplorable as 
the dazzling flame of the noonday sun. Mr. Wilde's critics 
should try goggles. People may not talk as Oscar Wilde's 
people do — this is best evidenced by the failures of his imi- 
tators; nor do women live who are so fair as those con- 
ceived within a painter's brain. Oscar Wilde is too much 
a poet to paint men and women as the world sees them. 
He makes them as he wishes they were. And what a 
genius to have, the wish and the m a ans of communicating 
it. In the literature of our times, An Ideal Husband will 
find a unique and honored resting place. As a play, to be 
played by players, its announcements will jostle for space 
with our obituaries in journals yet unnamed. 
* * * 

Among the women of the Lyceum Company Miss Irv- 
ing was prominent in Rebellious Susan, Miss Tyree carried 
ofl the honors in Amazons, so to equalize things it only 
needed the superb rendering of Mrs. Cheveley, by Miss 
Irish. Mrs. Cheveley is an adventuress, and Miss Irish 
does not attempt to conceal her character. From the 
first sight of her rakish front hair and well-rouged ears, 
it is plain that Mrs. Cheveley is to have what feminine vil- 
lainy there may be in the play. She has it in all grades 
and stages — from larceny to conspiracy — but through it all 
she maintains a deportment almost dignified; that is the 
only explanation for the appearance of a woman of her 
character in the society she haunts. Lord Goring is the 
third example of Herbert Kelcey's remarkable versatility 
that we have had this season. He plays it well enough to 
make it rival Sir Richard Kato, which was an ideal charac- 
terization. The part is generously bestrewn with bright 
lines, and Mr. Kelcey affects a drawling deliberation in his 
delivery of the pithy epigrams and paradoxes that fall to 
him, that is a life-like portrayal of a bright man conscious 
dl saying a bright thing. Miss Irving has a serious part 
as Lady Chiltern, ami she plays it in a sweet, womanly 
way. well modulated and sympathetic. In the scene where 
she compells her husband to write a letter to Mrs. Cheveley, 
she displays a dramatic strength that is surprising. Mr. 
Grattan's Sir Robert is the only character that seems out 
of proportion. His methods are melodramatic, and abound 
with eccentric gestures that are inartistic. Mr. Grattan's 
unhappiness is too tragic; it was the same in Rebellious 
Susan. We should like to see him when he has not so much 
trouble. Mr. Le Moyne makes a strong character of the 
old Earl, and Mrs. Walcot does an admirable bit as Lady 
Markby. 

The most exquisite and artistic ivory figures, miniatures, etc., lat- 
est importations, at S. it G. Gump's, 113 Geary street. 



Patriotic, melodrama is rather a big step from the ex- 
cellent plays the Frawley company has given us, but The 
Ensign is by no means a bad play for its class and it has 
received excellent performances at the Columbia during 
the past week. 

Tin Ensign is vigorous in its action, though at times the 
plot is vague. The clash of sabres and flow of blood found 
an unexpected echo in Mr. Frawley's acting, who as En- 
sign Baird displayed a vigor and dramatic force that 
strikes us as a pleasant shock after the living picture 
work he has done in so many of the recent plays. Frawley's 
acting of the Ensign was the best in the play and shows 
that there are no constitutional reasons why he should not 
put some energy into other roles requiring it. Mr. Ar- 
buckle has made himself a valuable member of the com- 
pany and his Cockson Dudley adds another splendidly sus- 
tained character to his record. Mr. King was also ef- 
fective as a British officer and Mr. Osbourne made the 
most of two dignified but ungrateful parts. Miss Lansing 
Rowan, the new member of the Frawley company, was too 
generously cast as Alice Greer. She is unemotional, stilted, 
and lacking in magnetism. Why prominent parts should 
be tried upon new people when the company has several 
capable women amoug its members, is a mystery. Miss 
Ross did much better than usual with Dot. Stage children 
arc nearly always uncanny, but Little Mildred earned her 

hearty applause. The scenery and effects are excellent. 

* * '# 

Vincent Wallace's Maritana, with its melodious old melo- 
dies and captivating story, has been drawing large houses 
at the Tivoli during the past week. The well-known bal- 
lads that have endeared the opera to music-lovers of all 
nationalities are never old enough to be refused a hearty 
reception where pure, tuneful music is appreciated, and 
each of the favorite songs have been encored nightly. Alice 
Carle, the new mezzo-soprano, was well received as Laza- 
rillo. She has naturally a good voice, but is somewhat ag- 
gressive in her use of it. Pache sang Don Ca?sar accepta- 
bly, and Laura Millard was excellent as Maritana. Raffael's 
Don Jose was the best character in the piece. The chorus 

and orchestra were, as usual, well-drilled and effective. 

* # # 

Tan Much Johnson is a title calculated to arouse curi- 
osity. William Gillette has given it to his new comedy, 
which is to be presented at the Baldwin on Monday even- 
ing. Tan Much Johnson is described as a study in laughter, 
and. as it scored an immense success in New York last 
season, it is safe to expect a novel and clever comedy. The 
author is cast as tbe leading character, and will be sup- 
ported by the original company that appeared in the 
metropolitan run of nearly a vear. 

* J- * 

Unusually large audiences have been flocking to see 
Leander Richardson's latest melodrama, Under tin Oity 
Lamps, at the Grand Opera House. The piece has every- 
thing to recommend it. From first to last the story holds 
the interest of the onlookers. The dialogue is very much 
better than that usually made useof by characters in melo- 
drama. In a word it proves that even a dramatic critic 
can write a presentable play on occasions. The attraction 
for the coining week is one of great interest, for it has 
never before been produced in America. The play in ques- 
tion is a Russian drama, entitled By Order of the Guar— a 
dramatization of Mathew Brenner's most popular story, 
"La Cabaret Rouge.'' It is said to be one of the greatest 
dramas of the day, and it will be staged in an excellent 
manner. 

* * * 

Monday will inaugurate a gala week at the Columbia, 
it being the farewell week of the Frawley Company during 
which they "ill produce five of the plays that have been 
the most popular during their season. Following is their 
repertoire: * Monday and Tuesday, All The Comforts of 
liana; Wednesday and Thursday, The Arabian Nights; Fri- 
day, Young Mrs. Winthrop; Saturday matinee and Satur- 
day night, Moths; Sunday (farewell performance), The 
Senator, 

* * # 

Flotow's lyric opera, Martha, will be sung next week at 
the Tivoli. George H. Broderick, a basso of reputation, 
who was a member of the American Opera Company, will 
make his first appearance at that house as Plunkett. 



i895- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



LETTER FROM BOHEMIA. 

D>DITOR Niwa LHTBB —There are thirty of vis in all. 
I j uii-ntly thirsty, (or toe weather i> 

vrly hot: in foi I 'ij; There i- ;i 

in the Russian River, however, far just here 
ire three miles away rrom Guerneville) the water i- 
mil there are tl irhich remind one 

of the waters ol Still the ory has gone up from 

amp to the club: "Send us a d us more ire!" 

For you see ice is a problem here. They don't seem to care 
for it in the little burg of Guerneville. The camp is pre- 
pared for all the members. The tents and their straw are 
Iso the casino I I ■ '■'■ ■ . "bar"). 

Our sylvan programme this year will be simplicity itself. 
as in the olden times. No Buddha will rear his holy head 
to awe the worshippers, and the High Jinks and the Burial 
of Care will involve no extravagance. Papers will be read 
at the High Jinks: then will follow the Burial of Care; 
after which the Low Jinks. The last will consist ol a 
parody on a meeting of the Board of Directors, at which 
rberding will preside, with "Chimmie Padden" Ham- 
ilton as his stage manager. Members will be summoned 
before the committee to confess why they ought to con- 
tinue to live, also why they have failed to be Presidents of 
the United States — and other things. 

We have a piano and an organ here, so that Donald de 
V. Graham tests his voice every day. It is in a large 
tent, for he refuses to sing in the open air. Greer Harri- 
son recites poetry before the camp fire at night, while 
Louis Sloss and Gerberding go serenading with Donny 
Graham and Johnny Lathrop. 

At a farm house near by: in fact, at several farm houses 
— there are rosy Blowsabellas. artless little country maids. 
Ned Hamilton arrived yesterday and made one of his char- 
acteristic after-dinner speeches. He'll say it all over again 
Saturday night. 

^Ve pay $2 a day till Saturday for board and tenting, 
and then five dollars. All members who start Saturday 
morning get off at five dollars for the entire trip. 

By the way, a lot of the Philadelphia officers have just 
arrived, headed by the gallant Lieutenant "Woods, and 
guided by the inimitable Jimmie Hamiltou and his ancient 
Prophet, Uncle George Bromley. Salutations! 

Camp Bohemia, August 1, 1895. Nepomtjck. 

SN important event in the amusement history of thi 
city will follow the Frawley Company's engagement 
at the Columbia. A company headed by Rose Coghlan, 
Henry E. Dixey, and Maurice Barrymore will give such 
comedies as Twelfth Niglit and The Rivals. A pleasant 
feature of this remarkable engagement is that the prices 
will not be advanced from those now prevailing at the 
Columbia. 

JUT ISS Ada Dougherty, daughter of C. M. Dougherty, 
J" has written the music to a song called "The California 
Woman," the words of which are by Kate Clark Brown. 
The song has a very catchy air, and will no doubt become 
popular. It is for sale at the Model Music Store, 735 

Market street. 

i 

Did you ever see daylight fireworks ?— snakes, and all the other 
reptiles and the fishes, and the ttiost dreadful serpents floating 
through the air ? Well, the Japanese have solved an " aerial " pro- 
blem, and Sunday, at 1:30 p. m., all (sober people may witness a most 
terrifying spectacle at El Campo. In Japan this is a favorite amuse- 
ment. Foreigners delight in it. But as it is, we have to be intro- 
duced to the daylight fireworks. The steamers Ukiah and James 
M. Donahue will leave for Tiburon art 10:30 a. m., 12 :10, 2 :00 and 4 p. M., 
returning from El Campo at 11:15^. M. and at 1, 3, and 5 P. M. The 
fare is only twenty-five cents. 



To afford the public an opportunity to view "A Night in Venice" 
at Belvedere Saturday night, August 3d, the San Francisco & North 
Pacific Railway Company will run there three large steamers, leav- 
ing Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market S't\, at 8:00, 8:15, and 8:30 p. M.; 
on the return, they will leave Tiburon at the close of the spectacle, 
about 11 :00 p. m. Bound trip 25 cen^s. 

' \ 

Anyone wishing a pleasant evening's entertainment cannot do 
better than by witnessing the emptying and refilling of the tanks of 
the Lurline Baths with salt water, pumped direct from the ocean, 
every evening at 10 :30 o'clock. In ferder to prove to the public that 
the water is pure no admission fee Will be charged, and the public is 
cjrdially invited to witness the operation. 



Tl Thf • ■ Qem " Thrittri' .,f I! 

>ia I neatre- Fri«n»mt<r. <«>i 



Oolumbia Frt«ll»ii<ler. Ooltl 

At ill. v, mi: i y RE WELL v 

cuing. August bin. Souvoulr nlgiit mi 
,l] of the enl 
prmcDlcd ' 

THE FRAWLEY COMPANY. 

Id tin' i tepertory: 

bforMU] Bod Tuondny. ALL THE 00MPORT9 OF HOME 

iii : \mian NIGHTS I 
—YOUNG MRS WISTHROP. Saturday afternoon uij.i 

PHI SENATOR 
luffust U i ii NIGHT. 

t tiir populB ■ [bt, 150., 85c, BOo,. 75c Sa turday mati- 

nee, i ■ 

B_|j > T"L J- Al - Hatmak & Co., (Incorporated) 

ald\A/in I neatre- proprietors! 

Commenoli g Mondaj aexl /Vugasi 5th. 
The roiu-iiiL' comedy, 

TOO MUCH dOHNSOh. 

With WILLIAM GILLETTE and all the original company. 



Tivoli Opera house. 



. EttNKSTINE KUKLING. 

Proprietor and Manager 

Last nights of Wallace's beautiful ballad opera, MARITANA. 
Next week— Flotow's lyric opm-a. 

MARThA. 

First appearance of GKORGE H. BRODERICK, Basso. 
Popular Prices 35c and 50c 



California Theatre- 



Al. Hayman &Co. 



(Incorporated) 
Proprietors. 



To-night and to-morrnw night. Matinee to-day- 
Farewell to the big hit, Hoyt's 

A BLACK SMEEP. 

With Otis Harlan as "Hot Stuff." 
First time iu this city of the 

Trilby Dance. 

See Trilby costume : Trilby " Bare Limbs" ; Trilby quaint dance 

to the sweet strains of " lien Bolt." 

At the Baldwin August 5th, TOO MUCH JOHNSON. 

Morosco's Grand Opera House. 

Handsomest Family Theatre in America. 
Walter Morosco, Sole Lessee and Proprietor. 

Last performances of " UNDER THE CITY LAMPS." 
MONDAY EVENING, August 5th, 



"BY ORDER OF 

Matinees Saturdays and Sundays. 



THE GZAR. 



Mechanics' Institute 

28th INDUSTRIAL 



San Francisco, 
Cal. 



EXPOSITION 



Opens August 13th and closes September 14th, 1895. 
Grand display of Home productions in art, science, and manu 
factures. 

Intending exhibitors should at once apply for space, for which 
there is no charge. 

PRIVILEGES— Several hids for the following exclusive privi- 
leges will be received by the committee until Tuesday, July 22d 
at 6 P. M. : Restaurant, ice-cream, soda, candy, root beer, waffles, 
pop-corn, perfumery. 

For specifications or any desired information apply at the office, 
31 Post St A S. HALLIDIE, President 

Rankin, Thomas X Go., 

THEATRICAL BUREAU AND AGENTS, 
916 MARKET ST., Columbian Building, Room 46. 
Professional talent for private entertainments furnished at 
short notice. Entire charge taken of same. Plays, sketches, 
etc., for sale or rent. Wanted, at all times, dramatic and 
vaudeville artists. Agents for C. D. Hess, Grease Paints 
and general stage make up. 

I II I I AM QCnnARH ^he En £lish actress, coaches ladies and gentle- 
LILLInl'J uCuutWiV, men for the dramatic professton; appearances ar- 
ranged. Shakespearean classes Wednesday evenings. SHAKESPEAR- 
EAN ACADEMY, 913 Hyde street. San Francisco. Cal. 



Wall Paper, 
Window Shades. 

Interior Decorating. 

G. W. Clark & Co. 



Largest Stock and Lowest Prices. 
Samples Sent, 



653 Market Street 



(~ID Dir'nDn'Q RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genn- 
Un. rilOUnU O l n e— A specific for Exhausted Vitality. Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medicine. Paris, 
and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States 
j. g. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisoo. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, $1 25; of 100 pills, $8; of 200 pills, 
$3 50; of 400 pills, S6; Preparatory Pills. $2. Send for circular. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1895. 




ALEXANDER Badlam has just returned from a fort- 
night's trip to Lake Tahoe. with a large-sized basket 
of the most elegant fish romances that ever was heard 
of. This is the record which he sprung on an admiring 
audience at the Produce Exchange last Tuesday morning. 
It reads so beautifully that it deserves being framed. 

"I fished the lake and whipped the streams there- 
abouts." said Mr. Badlam, joyously, and with sincerity in 
every lineament of his countenance. ''I fished as I never 
have fished in my life, save twice. The fishing there is 
grand, gentlemen. During my absence of fifteen days I 
fished on twelve of those days. It is against my strict 
religious principles ever to fish on Sundays. But week 
days I arose at four in the morning and fished until dark. 
And here is my record. At first, you understand, I had 
to accustom myself to the surroundings and the nature of 
the lake. After that everything went beautifully. Now. 
just look at this memorandum, and you will believe me at 
once •' 

Sunday, July 13 0,000 Sunday, July 20 0,000 

Monday, " 14 425 Monday, " 21 2.407 

Tuesday, " 15 930 Tuesday. " 22 4,132 

WedVv, " 16 . ... 1,260 Wed's'v. " 23 604 

Thursday'' 17 915 Thursday" ?4 .. 3.167 

Friday, " 18 1,903 Friday, " 2.5.. .4.829 

Saturday," 19 2,712 Saturday," 20 911 

Total 24,095 

"Now," continued Mr. Badlam. "to my mind, while that 
is not an extraordinary record for a two weeks' fish, still 
I believe that there are few men who could equal it in this 
city. Next week, I'm going to whip the Truckee streams. 
You can see by this computation I made that I caught 
twenty-four thousand fish inside of twelve days' work, an 
average of about two thousand a day. Two of these were 
bad days, like July 15th and July 23d, when the wind hurt 
the fishing. Still, I pulled out. " 

" Did you use a net ? " asked Al. Knight, satirically — 
for Knight is a mighty fisherman himself. 

"Nosiree!" cried Badlam. indignantly; "I am a true 
sportsman, sir ! I would not descend to such paltry vil- 
lainy ! " 

"Then," retorted Knight, with a vicious look in his eye, 
as he turned to go. " I am going to the Fish Commission- 
ers and ask them to stop the use of giant powder on Lake 
Tahoe!" 

Badlam snorted, gazed at him disdainfully, as he said to 
Secretary Friedlander with an urbane smile : 

"Carey, old boy, any time you want to go fishing I will 
lend you my rod and fly-book." 

Then he walked out and around the town, explaining to 
his friends that he hadn't seut them presents of trout be- 
cause they wouldn't stand the journey in hot weather. 

The newspaper reporters got hold of the record, how- 
ever, at the Palace Hotel, and would have exploited the 
marvelous story in the morniug papers, only it happened 
that Jack Wright, the railroad monarch of Sacramento, 
happened to be down on a visit to bis old friend, Fillmore, 
and Wright exploded what was about to be several beauti- 
ful "scoops." 

"Why. I was up there when Badlam was, and that 
record is about worth a State irrigation bond after Judge 
Ross has walked on it. Badlam sat on the hotel porch and 
drank cool drinks the whole time. Twenty-four thousand 
fish ! Shades of Jehosophat ! Let me fix that list for you. 
I know the truth, because he went out just once with a 
friend oi mine, and brought back three minnows, while my 
friend was catching hundreds, including a ten pounder 
thai amazed the oldest inhabitant. Now, I myself made a 
record which is the grandest in Pacific Coast history, and 
I will show it to you — confidentially, of course." 

But the reporters fled in disma} - . They had their fill for 
the day. 

The importations during lttt4or G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Extra Dry Cham- 
pagne aggregate so, 77s cases, or tl.7'>4 cases more than any other brand. 
Its 1889 vintage attracts great attention for remarkable quality, natural 
dryness, and purity. 



The Olympic Club is all politics nowadays, and there are 
as many factions as there are candidates. Of the several 
factions, here is the list according to high authority: 

The Gymnasts. 

The Sparring Element. 

The Billiard and Card Players. 

The Bicyclers. 

The Swimmers. 

The Fencers. 

Now, of these factions, the bicyclers have two hundred 
votes, and are, for the main part, of the best element in 
the club. The fencers are the aristocrats, of course — also 
they are haughty. The boxing and swimming factions in- 
volve the "rough-and-tumble" element, as a rule; and, 
strange to say. there have been many eliminations from 
this branch of the club in the last six months. While the 
juvenile department is perfect, many of the persons who 
came inou the "Ten- Dollar Racket" have been carefully and 
quietly dropped for non-payment of dues and other things. 
It had become necessary for the club to weed its garden. 
Harrison. Spreckels. and Coleman have all refused to take 
the next Presidency, and the matter is all at sea for the 
moment, although especial efforts are being made to get 
Coleman's consent. He would, undoubtedly, have a unani- 
mous vote at the election, and be elected. Fred Eaton is 
in the lead for Treasurer, though Aleck Forsythe, of 
Crocker & Co., and Jack Leighton, are "dark horses." 
Johnny Hammersmith has not only refused the "leader- 
ship," but has also declined any other office so for leader 
it is probable that the office will fall to Doctor Short or 
Charley Morrell. 

* * * 

It is not to be wondered at that Eugene Deuprey is a 
great criminal lawyer. He was brought face to face with 
tragedy when the down was soft upon his lip and he was as 
bright and happy a young attorney as ever sat down to a 
bachelor dinner with his friends. Twenty years ago Mr. 
DeuTjrey had two partners, James D. Fay and Harry Kind, 
and they both killed themselves. Jim Fay was as bright 
and careless as a summer day is long. Everybody loved 
him, for he had a good word for all mankind, unless he 
was prosecuting a case in court. He left here one day to 
go up to Coos Bay and try a suit. The next that was 
heard of him was that he had shot himself, in a saloon. 
Harry Kind poisoned himself for reasons which need not be 
brought up again, and Eugene Deuprey was left alone. 
From that day he has steadily pursued his path, looking 
neither to right nor left until he has reached the position 
which he sought. He is a little stricter, somewhat harder 
exteriorly, perhaps, than he was in 1874, but he is a good 
criminal lawyer. 

* * * 

They tell in Homer how Ulysses tried to get past the 
island where the syrens sang, and he managed it by hav- 
ing himself tied to the mast of his ship. 

But if he had ever tried to pass Wawona. he would have 
failed. This is the syren's abode on the Yosemite tour. 
You forget all that you anticipate when you find the com- 
fortable hotel there, and if once Mr. Washburn drives you 
to the Big Trees and to Signal Peak, that means a day's 
shortening of your Yosemite stay: and, for your part, you 
don't regret it one bit. 

Mr. Washburn has the most delightful stage line in ex- 
istence. It beats coaching from Paris to Versailles to ride 
over the splendid highway which has been built into the 
valley. His coaches are as swell as Talbot Clifton's, and 
the horses are thoroughbreds. The very drivers are some 
of the oldest stage-men iu California — and that is half the 
charm if you have an outside seat. To watch their skill is 
a liberal education in driving. 

* * * 

A most swagger affair is to be given during the first 
two weeks of September at Sutro Heights. The venerable 
bushy-faced Mayor is r.ot the giver, but the ladies forming 
the Channing Auxiliary Society. They are in need of funds, 
and so Mrs. Horace Wilson. Mrs. Lovell White, and a few 
kindred spirits have determined to have an open-air per- 
formance of -4s You Lih-r It at the Heights. Mr. S. H. 
Friedlander has, during these trying days, been waited on 
by the ladies, who have given to the genial manager many 
a hint as to how to conduct a show. Mr. Friedlander has 



August 3, 1895. 



PRAXC1 



It was in the early palmy days of the club, when Bo- 
hemia owned two or three rooms on the corner of Webb 
and Sacramento streets. So hilarious was she that it was 
lucky for her children that Yung & Massey's morgue was 
next door to act as a sedative. Even Dr. Swan used to 
go in there to check his flow of animal spirits, partly, per- 
haps, because he was Coroner, but usually as a corrective 
to Dr. Behr's and George Bromley's jokes. Bill Mestayer 
strolled in one day to the club (not the Morgue) and both 
Charley Bishop and Harry Edwards noticed that his brow 
was clouded. William was morbid, the result of late hours 
and the flowing bowl. "You're looking ill," said Harry 
Edwards. "I am very ill," replied Mestayer in a tragic, 
open-sixteen-foot-diapason voice. "Nervous, eh?" said 
Edwards; "don't sleep well at night, eyesight blurred, 
chilly and feverish by turns, and depressed in spirits?" 
"Hit to a dot," replied Mestayer; "what d'ye think's the 
matter with me?" "My dear Bill," continued Harry, 
solemnly, "you must take great care of yourself. Your 
alimentary canal is overflowing from hydrocephalitic tox- 
icology. Rest, dear boy, perfect rest, and avoid spirits 
three times daily. You'll be well in a week." Mestayer 
did not tell more than fifty or sixty persons a day that he 
was suffering from hydrocephalitic toxicology, and when, 
a week afterward, he found out that he had been made a 
fool of, the great actor came vei'y nearly making it a per- 
sonal matter with the genial beetle-collector. 



After dinner try A.darns' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum. You 
will find it admirable. 



For largest line of fine etchings and engravings, all the latest sub- 
jects, S. & G. Gump's Art Store is the place. 113 Geary street. 

"El Monte" Hotel, Sausalito. is now open for the summer sea- 
son, at prices to suit the times. Hot and cold salt water baths are 
connected with the hotel. 



offervd to loan all bin 

pron 

uol M. 

> 

do you know Mr. 

man in thi- universe. 

The women .ir. - rave about him, 

- good for two thousand tii Isets And thru think of 
him. Why. his very peculiar— ahem 

of picturesqueness ahem well, looks, make up the 

character, and he need require n" make-up. So Sammy ii 

1 be, ;md Sammy it will be, and now comes tin- crucial 

what woman valuing the sanctity of her borne, her 

husband's love, and children's will trusl them- 

- within his baneful love-inspiring glare to ask him to 

bo Touchstone. 

* * » 

Tis wondrous sweet, the taste of power. The ex-car- 
penter in the huge house somewhere by Oakland is aow 
drinking to the dregs the cup of the intoxicating beverage, 
containing the potation "influence." His groat mighti- 
who attained this dizzy altitude through the friend- 
ship of a defunct railroad magnate, is now receiving, with 
great haughtiness, the obsequious smiles that are showered 
upon him when he takes his journeys abroad. Not only he, 
but the family, are overpowered with their importance, 
and the gratified looks that overspread their unintellectual 
countenances when the haughty brakey or the lordly con- 
ductor tip their hats to the President, the Presidentess, 
and the Miss President, gives to the on-looker a feeling 
that the free and independent spirit of America is a mere 
sham. It must, indeed, be an unlimited source of comfort 
to Mrs. Presidentess to be thus enabled to ride, for the 
ancient aDd powerful dame is of a saving disposition and a 
frugal mind, and it is averred by her closest friends that 
she never used the narrow guage road, though nearest her 
domicile, while owned by Fair, for then she regarded the 
piling as dangerous; but, when the great company pur- 
chased it, it immediately became safe. Rumor has it that 
shortly a new President will be elected, and the glory of 
the Oakland man and family be cast into utter darkness. 




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Hundreds of testimonials by rich and poor attest the 

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To prove its efficacy. To prove its relief. 

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A sample will be given to you free. The more chronic 

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Cor. Market and Powell Sts. 



HENRY N. CLEMENT, 

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Dr. F. C. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 819 Market strcc! 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1895. 




ONE often hears of a " whirlwind of passion " in sensa- 
tional stories, but whirlwinds are nowhere in San 
Mateo County, it seems. They say a perfect cyclone of 
fear and trembling exists among the residents of San 
Carlos district over the possibility of having such a lynx- 
eyed postmaster as Nat Brittan to scan the envelopes of 
their several missives. Everyone who knows Nat is aware 
of his remarkable memory and tenacity of thought, and, 
once having seen a hand-writing, he can keep it in his 
" mind's eye, Horatio," till further notice. Hence there 
will be no use trying to carry on any kind of a corres- 
pondence in those parts that will not be on the square, 
which is the motif for the cyclone. 

* * * 

It is truly a pitiful sight to watch the dear mammas do- 
ing duty on the verandas these summer evenings. Per- 
haps what appeals to our sympathy, more than another, 
is their tenacious clinging on to past youth. If, in the 
afternoon of life they could but content themselves with 
the soft gray hair nature so kindly meant as a background 
for the wrinkles and faded coloring, instead of insulting 
that sweet naturalness by pinning on a bought wig as a 
fitting crown to the drugstore complexion. In truth, they 
deceive no one but themselves. The whiter one, of the 
two sisters, who resides at the Palace, and who delights in 
being strikingly noticeable at all the fashionable church 
weddings and funerals, perhaps wears her adjustments 
more cleverly than most women. 

* * # 

In a few weeks, when the belles and debutantes will be- 
gin to flock back to town, a number of the most prominent 
ones will then rehearse for the tableaux which will be 
given under the patronage of some of our well-known 
society leaders for the benefit of the Girls' Union, or, as 
some one has called it, the Opposition Woman's Exchange. 
So many new features will be introduced that it will be en- 
tirely different from anything yet attempted here. The 
ushers, candy, lemonade, and flower venders will all be 
well-known girls, even the ticket sellers, ticket takers, 
and check room girls will be belles and beauties. There is 
some tall; of having the orchestra composed entirely of 
the feminine gender. In fact, the new man will not I ie is 
it at all I 

* * # 

Who knows but this winter, when the California street 
mansion is thrown open for the pretty daughter's debu- 
tante, may see la belle mere the leader of the hill instead 
of her next door neighbor and sister-in-law. As the sum- 
mer advances one hears continually of the popularity of 
one and the snobbishness of the other. While the atmos- 
phere at Burlingame is weighted with seriousness and nar- 
rowness, impregnating its occupants with the same disa- 
greeable tendencies, the naturalness of the crags has been 
healthfully absorbed, and joyously contagious, until the 
sisters-in-law are like darkness and daylight, and as far 
away as the pole-.. 

# * * 

Is it to advertise themselves once again, or it it an 
actual fact that the St. Louis mamma and her brood of 
daughters are to shake the dust of our windy city from 
their skirts and storm the gates of the Four Hundred be- 
yond the Rockies'.' Time is getting on, and as only a 
millionaire's bank account could stand the siege, and none 
seemingly have thought it worth while to try the experi- 
ment, perhaps it is a> well that another field' be given an 
opportunity. It could not be less successful, and perhaps 
might be the means of reducing the number. 

* * * 

Times are indeed hard, and credit getting scarce, or else 
would that cold-blooded haberdasher of Kearny street have 
held up that lady and not let her depart for Alaska until she 
had settled a mere trifle of $300 for underwear ? The lady 
left for Alaska after the husband had settled the bill, with 
some few warm remarks quite in accord with- the cold jour- 
ney before her. 



Consul Hall, of Turkey, has moved to Pierce street with 
the remnants of his once magnificent collection of bric-a- 
brac and Circassian trousers. He says that henceforth 
he will never go to another fire. By good fortune he had 
the Sultan's firmin for his title of "Sir George Hall, 
Knight of the Medjedje," in his office at the time c f the 
(ire at his home, eise it would have deprived our society of 
another morsel of its European rank. Nevertheless. Con- 
sul Hall's splendid regalia went up in the flames, and he is 
inconsolable. It came from Paris, and cost many sequins. 
Now, the consular functions of Turkey on civic occasions 
will be temporarily suspended — that is, until Mr. Hall se- 
cures a new pair of gold-braided trousers! 

* * # 

From Tahoe comes a whisper that has created consterna- 
tion among a host of relatives and friends; club tongues 
are wagging, and all wonder if it can be true that the 
cynic star of the Romeo and Juliet travesty has at last suc- 
cumbed to a woman's charms, and that the reported 
adored one be a blue-stocking at that. Who knows ! More 
cynical men than his lordship, Donald G., have been known 
to be fickle-minded. The maiden has a social standing and 
a loveliness far beyond the average Californian. 

* * * 

Unless Mr. Hobart's mental calibre is stronger than 
that of most of our young millionaires, it will soon be turned 
by the. adulation the men show him, the notoriety the press 
gives to him, and the sickening rank toadyism the girls 
throw at him. Why charming girls from charming homes 
can belittle themselves to do homage to a few bank notes 
is past all understanding, and no one in his heart resents 
it more than this same manly young croe.sus. 
* * * 

Dr. Younger has been spending the entire week at the 
Bohemian Jinks, and. in consequence, Jere Lynch staid in 
town. It seems he put his name on the " campers' list " 
in the Bohemian Club's secretary's office, just a few minutes 
before Lynch walked in. Then Lynch looked and walked 
out. It is said the dental bill will be compromised. 

* * * 

Where, oh where, have the two dromios of the past 
decade in the swim betaken themselves that they do not 
bob up serenely at any of the " fashionable functions" as 
chronicled in the daily press? No doubt, however, that the 
arrival at Del Monte of Mrs. M. M. M. Latham will soon 
be followed by one or both of the gentlemen. 

* * * 

Society is wondering will the recently wedded Mrs. 
Willie Babcock come out to vegetate at the San Rafael 
cottage, or will the newly made benedict be transplanted 
to Eastern soil. 



The Duke of Vallambrosa, who lives in Cannes, France, has 
borders of Moet & Chandon bottles to the amount of 14,000 about 
bis flower-beds. It is an old Dulch custom, started by William the 
Silent, of Holland.— Lloyds Weekly. 



Don't fail to chew Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum after 
meals. Indigestion fades beforeit. 



G. Mareu & 

Lioer-BGlalr, 

Nuits (Cote d'Or.) 
Red &. White BURGUNDIES 



Clos de Vougeot 

Chambertin 

Beaune 

Pommard 

Chablis (white), and 

Chablis " 1878 



Id Cases. Quarts, 

;md Pints. 



Sold by the Leading Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
Sole Agents Pacific Coast. 314 Sacramento St., S. F. 



A UK' 



FRANC U S LETTER. 



'3 



RhM9?fi! 



WK h.i .ninir our minor. 

We irere quite unhappy I that cool days 

our portion, and rea impossibility of cool 

lawns and white flannels, and u* ;i punishment we have 
<ont heavy, "mugf .>r. hot enough and 

Bticky enough to maki as though the hoi room of 

u Turkish bath might be ;i pleasant change. Then, in the 
evenings we have bad violent thunder storms, with blazes 
and flares of chained and forked lightning, and a wind 
strong enough to uproot trees, wrench off shutters, and to 
knock over even an iron-roofed (but unfinished) building. 
It is never well to rail against the decrees of an all-wise 
and supreme adjuster of the weather. You are spared all 
Buch temptation. Every one who is not talking weather 
is talking yacht. Even the quiet and conservative Mr. 
Iselin is jubilant and animated, and seems satisfied that his 
boat is sure to win the autumn n ces. We have grown so 
stomed to holding the cup that 1 think we would feel 
more dazed than shocked were it to go to another. I am 
sorry we did not distinguish ourselves at Henley. It was 
st absurd to hope for any such fortune. That "blood 
will tell" is a lesson which some of us Americans need to 
learn. The Englishman of the sort that rows at Henley 
has been a waterman or an athlete of some sort for gen- 
erations, while many a man rowing in one of our Varsity 
eights has never seen a boat until he entered college. A 
correspondent tells me. and I value the information (as one 
must value private news above the dispatches), that Cornell 
was actually rowed to a standstill (one man fainted), while 
the Trinity Hall men were as fresh as paint when the race 
was over. The Cornell men was a good crew for ambition 
but a poor one for accomplishment. 

It is extraordinary what a hold the bicycle craze has 
upon all people, regardless of age. sex, or condition. I saw 
a child, surely not more than four, spinning along gaily 
yesterday not long after I had seen a woman, matronly 
and corpulent, wheeling by with every air of enjoyment 
and positively indifferent to her grotesque appearance. 
Miss Virginia Fair has held a unique position in Newport 
among bicyclists until last week, when two little maids 
from Boston excelled her speed in going around the ocean 
drive, beating her time by four minutes nineteen seconds. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Merrill are at Long Branch, where 
J. B. Maxwell and R. B. Mitchell sought the refreshing 
breeze last Sunday. Colonel Fred Crocker arrived in town 
last week, and is very busy, occupying himself, I under- 
stand, with some oil combination which is to develop the 
already colossal Crocker fortune to more colossal propor- 
tions. James Robinson, of Los Angeles, is at the Bruns- 
wick, and John King, of San Diego, is visiting his mother, 
Mrs. McMillen, at Southampton, Long Island. Dr. and 
Mrs. Adolph Barkan sailed on the North German Lloyd 
steamer a few days ago. 

Hugo Toland has gone to Quissitt Harbor, Massachu- 
setts, with his friend, "Jo" Holland. The play in which 
he appears with the Hollands will not be produced until 
September 3d on account of the hot weather. 
The play's name has been changed from 
Horace to The Man With a Past. It is very 
clever. 

Lieutenant G. Bailey has been ordered 
to Sandy Hook to protect Government in- 
terests against the squatters. Mrs. John 
Cutting is stopping at the Gerard Hotel, 
pending the results of her law suits. She 
lives very quietly and simply, and is always 
spoken of with sympathy by those who have 
heard of her matrimonial trials. Mr. and 
Mrs. George Law are entertaining several 
guests on their yacht, the Veto. It may in- 
terest some of his old friends amongst you 
to know that since his marriage last year 
his once convivial habits have entirely dis- 
appeared, and his strongest stimulant is 
Apollinaris. Miss Mary Sturgis, who spent 



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Sutter Street Hanwiani 

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Turkish, 
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Open day and night for gentlemen. 



For Ladies, from 9 A. M to 6 P. M. 



two winters at the Palace and in Southern California, was 
married yesterday to Frederick Harold Lovejoy, of Col- 
chester, England. Her husband has a large estate in the 
county, and America will probably not see her for a long 
time. 

I hear from England of the very jolly times at Madame 
Melba's cottage, "The Lodge," at Ray Meade, near 
Maidenhead. "The Lodge" is a pretty little cottage, one 
of the elastic sort so common in England, that look as 
though they were made for two and can easily put away 
twenty. Poor Jack Haylej' had this same cottage the 
year before he died. Madame Melba entertains largely. 
Miss Johnstone Bennett is spending the season with her. 
Harry Dam is, I hear, hard at work on a new play, which 
is already promised to a manager. The old story of a 
prophet who is obliged to seek honor away from his own 
country. I am sorry to announce to his numerous friends 
amongst your readers that George Meinecke is still very 
ill in London and making apparently no progress toward 
recovery. 

New York, July 24th, 1S95. Passe-Paktout. 

That beautiful cloisonne 1 ware, inkstands, crosses, candlesticks, 
and great variety of other ornaments in beautiful cloisonne ware, 
just received at S. & G. Gump's, 113 Geary street. 




A 20 MULE HELP-KITCi1EH- d IAUHDRY. 

PACIFIC COAST BORAX CO. S.ffWrfGISCO-CHICA60-HCWTfO»K, 






14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1895. 



&&*&* 



Comstock The good people on Pine street are awaiting 
Mining the advent of a stock boom with all the patient 
Market. expectation of the sect which nightly ret urns to 
rest in anticipation of the end of the world and 
Kingdom Come before the dawn breaks. The bad people, 
on the contrary, are rip-roaring and snorting around cuss- 
ing everything and everybody connected with the mines, 
up hill and down dale. These are the right kind of people 
to have around. They dont go well at a funeral, as a rule, 
but elsewhere they are kind of useful to liven matters up 
when others feel like killing themselves for lack of some- 
1 1 ling better to do. The bad men on the street are always 
more or less in evidence. Like the poor — represented by 
the broken-down speculator in Pauper Alley — they are al- 
ways with us, and always ready for a good old-fashioned 
growl. To get iu among a crowd of them is as good as a 
circus, and to clear the street of them just now would be 
to turn Pine street and its purlieus in the vicinity of the 
Exchange into a wilderness, with the howling omitted. 
But, all said and done, if some one with brains and money, 
principally the latter, does not materialize an Pine street 
before long, there will be precious little left to growl 
about. The game is about as dead now as it can be, and 
even the most gritty of the broking fraternity are begin- 
ning to show signs of weariness and general disgust. If 
some of the leading men in the Board grow weary enough 
to put on their hats some morning and retire from the 
floor for good, it will put the mining manipulators in such 
an awkward fix that they will wish they hod cultivated 
trading a little more. That is, of course, if they propose 
to keep the mines on the Board. If they do not, and have 
some other end in view, they are now going the right way 
to secure it. " Bull " news from the mines now requires 
some financial backing to make it carry weight with the 
street. Only one assessment was levied during the week: 
twenty-five cents on Sierra Nevada. 

The Market The sale of the Pioneer mine for $150,000 
for has given rise to all sorts of rumors, which 

Gold Mines, are as ridiculous as they must be exasper- 
ating to the management. Without any re- 
gardforthe facts the price has been fixed at from $300,000 
to $1,000,000, the last-named amount having been copied 
from some uninformed sheet for the entire length and 
breadth of the State. This kind of thing is going to hurt 
the business now growing up in California gold mines, un- 
less it is stopped. Big talk of this kind may sound very 
well, but there is no sense to it, and nine people out of ten 
only laugh at the absurd statements. It is the same thing 
in writing up ore values in mines. Figures arequotednow 
and then about the grade of ore in this mine or that, and 
and with the best possible intentions at that, which simply 
make a laughing stock of the owner, who may be accredited 
with the assertions. When we hear of a vein of ore run- 
ning $40,000 to the ton, it may go down with a tenderfoot, 
but not with any one else. The average run of men now 
handling mines here lor what they are worth are a more 
decent set than those which disgraced the State in the past. 
They mean to do what is right, and most of the properties 
offered are at figures which can be termed fair. Million 
dollar going concerns are a scarce commodity here as else- 
where, and people who want a fancy article of the kind 
had better begin slow but sure to make their own bonanza 
by the development of some of the many promising pros- 
pects which offer. 

A Silly The interior press is now loud in its complaint 

Question about the invasion of Shasta County by foreign 

To Ask. capitalists. The question is asked on all sides 

why did not San Francisco capitalists take hold 

the rich Iron Mountain mine, and do what the English 

ompany is now doing to such good advantage financially, 

Another paper says the same and mentions several other 

properties, such as the Uncle Sam, owned in London; the 

Quartz Hill, owned in Poland; the Washington. Gladstone, 

and all the desirable mines on Mule Mountain, and Salt 

Creek, owned by Eastern capitalists. Some of these 



writers should come down here and try to raise a little 
money among the so-called "capitalists," and then go home 
and confine his conundrums in the future to the geological 
formation of the moon. If the gentlemen brought a few 
nuggets with them, they would be able to borrow a safe 
amount upon them, by paying for an expert examination. 
When money is raised to equip and work a mine decently 
in this city, it will not be obtained from the men we are 
pleased to dignify with the name of capitalist. Their en- 
terprise is limited as a rule to a close watch upon the 
seals placed on coin sacks and safe deposit vaults, to see 
that they are not broken by design or accident. 

Prosperous Business has improved considerably in this 
Local city during the past month, the bank clear- 

Investments, ings aggregating $58,881,308, against 
$45,570,136 for the same period in 1894. 
For the first seven months of 1895 they were $383,507,404, 
against $370,190,714 for the first seven months of 1894. 
This is a remarkably good showing, and it can be accepted 
as a forerunner of much livelier times during the coming 
fall. While business in local securities is quiet, the de- 
mand will improve from this on, as money is very plentiful 
with all classes of investors, who will return to the market 
when the season for summer outings has ended and people 
get back into town. Last month the sum of $802,060 was 
paid out in dividends, a little below the sum paid during 
the same month a year ago. This may be accounted for 
by the absence of all powder dividends last month, and a 
heavy decline in Miscellaneous. The banks and water 
companies also paid less than a year ago. On the other 
hand, mining companies paid out last month in dividends 
$156,250, against $107,350 for the same time a year ago, 
and every dollar of this can be credited to California com- 
panies, a very creditable showing, and at the same time a 
straw which shows the way the wind is setting. And yet 
this does not by any means represent the large sums which 
private individuals are drawing from investments in gold 
mines which no one ever hears anything about. 

Among the The only new feature reported in local in- 
Underwriters. surance circles during the week was the 
advent of the General Fire & Marine In- 
surance Company, of Triest, Austria, on the Pacific Coast, 
Okell. Donnell & Co. receiving the appointment of General 
Agents. This is said to be the first time that this com- 
pany, which is the largest Fire and Marine company in the 
world, has ever made upon this side of the Atlantic. For 
the present it will only conduct a marine department, ow- 
ing to the unsatisfactory condition of the Fire business 
here just now. and the dull prospects for some time to 
come. It is also rumored on the street that Mr. Arthur 
C. Donnell has been offered the general agency of the 
United States Casualty Company, of New York, one of the 
strongest concerns in this line of business, numbering 
among its incorporators such men as Chauncey M. Depew, 
William R. Grace, Tom Piatt, and Perry Belmont. Out- 
side of this there are few items of interest afloat; and busi- 
ness is just dull enough to make many people regret the 
disruption of the old compact. The worst of it is there is 
very little light ahead at present to suggest the hope of 
an improvement. 

New York The past week has been the most active one 
Stock in railroad stocks for the past two years, par- 
Market, ticularly the Granger lines. The continued 
flattering prospects for growing corn and 
oats has been the chief support. The buying has bees 
largely for investment, while short sales were covered to 
quite an extent. If the prospects are realized, still further 
advances will take place without a doubt. Burlington 
gained 4] per cent.. Atchison, 21 ; Missouri Pacific. 5', ; 
Northern Pacific, 21; Northwestern, 2; Rock Island, 41, 
and St. Paul, 4j. The entire list shows more or less gains 
while the above lines led. In Industrials the advance has 
been very satisfactory; sugar since our last report has 
advanced from 114' to IIS, and closed to-night at 1174. 
Chicago Gas has been active under the new plan of re- 
organization, and now seems to be on a firm basis. The 
advance of 6J per cent, is probably the best evidence of the 
demand. TJ. S. Cordage is again active, under the new 
agreement recently effected, selling to-day at 3 for com- 
mon and 43 for preferred, against f and 1J a week ago. 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 




IT must be a funny czpei a mail in thesi 

. •. of the century to be tried by a body ol pe 
ids. It mil be observed that, while deacons are pre- 
sumably immaculate, they have no pretensions to infalli- 
bility or perfect whiteness except in the matter of shirt 
fronts Yet gravely and the unordained, non- 

crated, not even beatified deacons of the First Con 
1 ttional Church have been sitting In judgtnenl on two 
•d men as we have in the community, Messrs. Frank- 
Mason ami Meyer Strauss, as though they were deadly 
Durante in disguise. The mortal sin charged was their 
daring to express their opinion as to how a church society 
should be run. with a rider tacked on which hit the pastor. 
The average man will he sorry for Dr. Brown, because the 
star chamber proceedings recently held prove that the in- 
cumbent of a great, good, and influential church is. after 
all. subordinate to thediaconate which runs pastor, church, 
and congregation at its own sweet will, with an absolutism 
as severe as that of the inquisition or any other relic of 
barbarous ecclesiastical mediaevalism. 

IT is generally supposed that charitable institutions are 
designed to carry out works of mercy. Yet it is an- 
other blot on the so-called eleemosynary works of San 
Francisco that not one could be found willing to receive a 
little twelve-year-old girl who has an hereditary passion 
for stealing. Yes, there was one, the Magdalen Asylum 1 
which is the last place to which a child not accused of im- 
morality should be committed. Doubtless the good Sisters 
will see to it that this little kleptomaniac is not to be 
further contaminated by evil associations, but yet it seems 
difficult to understand how they can be avoided. It makes 
one think of Adelaide Proctor's story of the child angel re- 
fused admission everywhere until she reached the hovel of 
the pale, weary woman, branded with sorrow and sin, who 
was the only one in aE the city that would shelter the 
wanderer. Only, of course, Edna Trueworthy is by no 
means a child angel. 

WITH a delicate sarcasm which Mr. Huntington will 
doubtless duly appreciate, a contemporary suggests 
that the way to avoid "knocking down" fraudulent trans- 
fers and newsboys' raids on the income of the Market- 
street Railroads, the company should reduce the fare to 
2J cents. In other words, in order to stop peculation, it 
should bisect its receipts and cut off its financial nose in 
order to spite its monetary face. It is a wonder that the 
brain which evolved this sagacious problem did not suggest 
that the street-cars should carry passengers for nothing. 
Then it would be impossible for the wiley conductor to raid 
the funds, and the deceitful newsboy would have to search 
for fresh avenues of illicit revenue. 

THE idiot who writes to the query column of a daily 
newspaper ought to be manacled as to his mouldy 
limbs to the editor who inserts his chaotic questions. One 
more than usually afflicted victim of paresis asks the 
Examiner how many copies of the Pilgrim's wheat crop 
for 1892 and 1893 were sold, and how many bales of Bun- 
yan's progress were exported, or words to that effect, in 
one Keeleyized breath. Another man would like to know 
if the records of poll-tax collections in San Francisco were 
destroyed during the Chicago fire. But let us dissemble 1 
The subject is too dangerous to life and limb to pursue 
further. 

THE Rev. Philip Graif is quoted as saying, in a phillipic 
leveled against politicians, that "loafers, wholesale 
slanderers, and verminiferous organ papers control elec- 
tions" with "melodramatic nick-names, garbage-box prod- 
dings and pictorial falsehoods." Mr. Graif evidently im- 
ports his words four in a box from New York, and it is 
only fair to suggest to him that he sit down and compile a 
dictionary. If he can keep up his lick there would be no 
disproportionableness in the longdrawnoutedness of his vo- 
cabulary, which is entirely reminiscent of the utterances 
of the Man of Galilee. 



THE lady who trie. it of this world of misery 

Into an unknown Elysium this week by bolting a big 
iron spoon, has evidently heard the ancienl songanent the 
man who "cut hi-, throat with alumpof chalk and stabbed 

himself with a >ilk umbrella." It la in order to Buggesl a 
novelty or two to the next philosopher contemplating sui 
vide. A. man once accidentally swallowed a mouse 
died in ten minutes, and gulping down a lead pencil Is a 
sm-e road to Heaven. Bui it i-. well to remind the de 
spondent that just now they ran purchase eleven cucum- 
bers tor five cents, and that the struggle is almost pain- 
less, The tamale, when made of genuine crow, is equally 
successful, but not altogether as reliable. 

IT will be delightful when the New Woman comes to us 
and asks u> for our voles. When she is running for 

office she will promise us anything, and everything, we 
ask, if we only assure her that she can depend on us mark- 
ing the ballot paper as she wants it to be marked. Bliss- 
ful prospect; happy dream; rapturous hope. Who 
wouldn't advocate the New Woman's right to everything 
under the inspiration of thought such as this? A woman's 
"yes" for the mere favor of marking a ballot paper would 
cause the world to heave topsy-turvy, in a social way, and 
who knows but there may be something more than jest in 
the idea. 

IT must be a source of gratification to the average citi- 
zen to know that another pawnbroker has been robbed. 
These little gleams of sunshine come into our hearts all too 
seldom, yet they are welcome, however long deferred. The 
man who has the nerve to break a pawnbroker's window 
and extract a trifling case of diamond rings ought to be 
encouraged. He is a public benefactor, and if his modesty 
were not so great he ought to be prevailed upon to sit for 
a marble statue. Persons intending to go into this busi- 
ness are requested to call at this office after dark and re- 
ceive all necessary assistance in the pursuit of their noble 
career. 

THERE is much nonsense talked about the great in- 
dustry of the State. While the growers are still 
quarreling among themselves as to causes of the "gluts" 
that occur each summer, some wise man rises in a conven- 
tion of our horticulturists to prophesy that California is to 
become "one vast fruit orchard." Even this absurdity is 
eclipsed by the statement attributed to Secretary Lelong, 
of the State Board of Horticulture, that "our olive is the 
purest known." Let the press, in its wisdom, give the 
public relief from the stale old balderdash about fruit. 
Our able editors have dwelt too much upon the gopher and 
the grape. 

THERE was a grim inequality in the arrest of the actors 
at the Alcazar this week. The hoary sinner who con- 
ceived and wrote the play was allowed to go on his own re- 
cognizance, whilst the puppets, the poor actors who were 
busking for bread and butter, were consigned to a dun- 
geon, and flung, as it were, into the mouldy cell. There is 
no question as to the impropriety of turning over to the 
mimic stage the most awful drama ever enacted in real 
life, but it could have been suppressed without incarcerat- 
ing a lot of harmless Thespians who have to play the devil 
if the part be given them. 

THE Rev. Dr. C. O. Brown is variously distinguished. 
Some months ago he made himself eminently odious 
because of his outrageous attacks upon a fellow preacher 
who had the unhapplness to differ with him. And now the 
good doctor is again prominent as the dictator of a little 
church society. There was for a week or two some dis- 
cord in the organization, but the deacons of Dr. Brown's 
church have been pleased to announce that harmony has 
been entirely restored. Those who disagreed with the 
reverend boss have retired, and he now has his own way. 

ONE Henry Varley, called " an evangelist, " has solemn- 
ly declared, in a letter to a London paper, that San 
Francisco is "Satan's seat." And with the object of com- 
bating the wide-spread infidelity here, Mr. Varley an- 
nounces his purpose, of writing a pamphlet, to be entitled 
"Is there a personal devil?" This. pamphlet he proposes to 
scatter "over a wide area." If the devil can stand this 
sort of thing, so can we. It is only Varley's way of ad- 
vertising himself. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1895. 







HS& 



" JVi ^ Climb in the Alps and Caucasus," by A. F. Mum- 
± \_ mery. is a sumptuously made up book. It is free 
fi-oi 1 all scientific terms, and the author confines himself to 
the sport of conquering stubborn peaks. He expresses 
the opinion that the amateur mountain climber is deter- 
iorating in quality, an opinion which we find it difficult to 
reconcile with late achievements in the Alps and the Him- 
alayas. 

'"The Story of Primitive Man" is the work of a student 
rather than that of a thinker or an investigator. The 
author, Mr. Edward Clodd, does not believe in the missing 
link, and the one redeeming feature in the book is that he 
places ancient man on a higher pedestal than he has occupied 
hitherto. He thinks we have not altered so much as we 
vainly fancy. If the civilized part of us is recent, in struc- 
ture and inherited tendencies, we are each of us hundreds 
of thousands of years old. 

"The Golden Goal" is another contribution to the story 
of the gold fever of '49. It contains selections of personal 
reminiscences and sketches by Dr. J. C. Tucker, now pub- 
lished by his wife, with the hope that they may prove in- 
teresting to his family and friends. Itis dated "San Fran- 
cisco, June, 1895," and it is chiefly interesting for the well- 
known "old-timers" it recalls. The book has no literary 
merit, and does not pretend to any, but the. fathers of the 
"Native Sons" will read it with pleasure. William Doxey, 
631 Market street, San Francisco. 

Public Opinion, London, was the first of its kind, in 
English-speaking nations, to survive into its well-deserved 
maturity. It has now just completed its fifty-second year, 
and its usual annual "Contents" is on our table. There is 
a wonderful variety of "opinions" on all subjects in this 
"Contents," and we cannot easily imagine anything, in 
short extracts from newspapers, more complete and di- 
versified than the list of subjects given in the volume be- 
fore us. 

Anyone who wants to see Alphonse Daudet, the "French 
Dickens,' as he is called, at his best should read this new 
English translation of his "Fromont Jeune et Risler Aim'. '' 
Many good authorities consider this as Daudet's best work, 
and in painting the bourgeoisie andlower classes the author 
has shown himself a master at observing and putting in 
words the appearance, speech, and manner of the diverse 
types of which thbse classes are composed. 

Jewish history and literature are well to the front this 
week. There are four new volumes and translations before 
the public, and they are all of interest. The works are: "The 
History of the Jews," "A History of the Hebrews." by R. 
Kittel, Ordinary Professor of Theology in the University 
of Brcslau; "The Aspect of Judaism," and "Jewish Liter- 
ature," which presents Judaism in its familiar, not to say 
sentimental, aspect. 

Ibsen and Bjornson have a colleague in that simple, but 
strong, Norwegian novelist, Jonas Lie, whose last story, 
"The Commodore's Daughter.'' is a refreshing piece of 
quiet, domestic reality to read in these days of rush ami 
sensLitinn. The scene is laid in a Norwegian port, and. as 
a study of Norwegian life and habits, it will be found inter- 
esting and instructive. 

The last number of the Academy contains a painstaking 
review of the posthumous volume of Anthony Froude on 
"English Seamen in the Sixteenth Century." The writer, 
Mr. E. Purcell, measures Froude, as a' historian, fairly 
well when he says that he had great qualities but was not 
always well directed, and did not possess industry enough 
to make him at all times reliable. 

"Recollection of War Times," by A. G. Riddle, member 
of the House of Representatives from the Nineteenth Dis- 
trict, Ohio, is a chatty volume, and is given to the world 
in the seventy-ninth year of the author's life. Mr. Riddle 
gives pen pictures of Sumner, Seward, Scott, Lincoln, 
Stanton, and other prominent figures of those stirring 
times. 



Mark Twain's criticism of Fennimore Cooper, which ap- 
pears in the North American Review, is severe but not 
unjust. Cooper created impossible surroundings, nodoubt. 
His diction may seem to belong to an era long past. 
Measured by a rule and tested by the creed of a peda- 
gogue, Cooper probably suffers a diminution of his fame, 
but we love his "Last of the Mohicans," with all its absurd 
exaggeration- and under all his curiosities of construction. 
and of style, there throbs a sincerity, a depth of feeling 
and of delicate, imaginative, gentle feeling, for which 
writers even more polished, more pure in style, more re- 
fined in humor, mure guiltless of "literary offenses" than 
Mark Twain himself might well be grateful. 

"Terminations," the last volume of Mr. Henry James, is 
a puzzle. Mr. James has done good work, but he has 
neither displayed the faculty of invention nor the power of 
story telling in his "Terminations." Perhaps he despises 
those things, and if so, then he has been successful in plac- 
ing before us a series of stories which have no skill in the 
construction of plot or the combination of incidents. The 
writing is charming, but for the story, as Canning's Needy 
Knife Grinder 
none to tell, sir 



said: "Story? Lord bless you! I have 



Canada is considered the least literary of the British 
colonies, although those who make the charge too often 
appear to forget that there are two Canadas — the Canada 
of the French Canadians and the Canada of the English- 
speaking people. We were reminded of this when we saw 
"The Zeit Gcist." by L. Dougall, a Canadian writer who 
published some crude but vigorous fiction, of which his 
present work appears to be the best. The story is im- 
probability itself, but there is some literary merit in the 
writing. 

" Meditations in Motley " is one of the great successes 
of the literary year among cultivated readers. The author, 
Walter Blackburn Harte. has attracted much attention in 
England, as well as in this country; and he has been warmly 
commended in the London press by Richard Le Gallienne, 
Israel Zangwell, and other notable men of letters, while 
the London Academy, the leading critical weekly in Great 
Britain, has accorded his work the highest praise. 

Miss Varina Anne Jefferson Davis, the "Daughter of the 
Confederacy," has written a novel of old times in Virginia. 
It is said to be strong and emotional. The Harpers are 
bringing it out. 

The Survival of the Fittest. 
Furniture moved, stored, packed, and shipped at low rates by Morton 
Special Delivery. Only experienced men employed. Equipment first- 
class. Oflices— 31 Geary street, and ^08 Taylor street. 



Del Monte, Golden West, and Sierra are the three grades that give 
the best values in writing-papers. Berkshire is the best typewriting 
paper, and the Crown is the best fountain pen made. Sanborn, 
Vail & Co., 741 Market St., are the sole agents for all the above. 

Turn it 
UDSide-down : 

It won't hurt it. 

There are no drib's or sedi- 
ment in the bottom 

Drinkers of Evans' India 
Pale Ale know that and 

do not hesitate to drain 
the bottle. 

When two years old it is 
properly bottled by experts 
and will keep in any climate 

There is no otbei Ale ll juSi 

</s good " as Evans' 

Sold Everywhere. 

Brewery and Bottling Works: 

NEW YORK. 

G. ft. E»vans & Sons. 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, 

Paoiflc Coast Ayents, San Francisco, Portland, 
Los Angeles 




Angus 



FRANCISCO N'l-WS LETTBR 



A BOOK OF THE WEEK.* 



M RS Humphrey Ward is with us wain. Ami if we are to 
i V judge by comparison, thi* to u> with 

•hat bears the • l on t<> her "Marcella" 

or "R smere" that a \ etch bears to B 

highly finished picture. Tin- • a" was 

in its sympathetic and powerfu delineation of >\n and -uf- 
bring incidental to the lowest stratum of English rural 
life, where poverty, if not the direet incentive, is tin- 
primary cause of violence and bloodshed. There are 
a of humble life in that work which have seldom, if 

been surpassed for literary finish, or accurate ob- 
servation, in the English language, and the pictures she 

drew remained fixed on the memory. Hut in her last 
book. "The Story of Bessii ' strell," Mrs. Ward appears 
to have forgotten herself. She is -till brilliant. There is 
still the same lucidity in her composition, the same concen- 
tration in her pictures of rural life in England. There is. 
too. the same severe impartiality in the way she handles 
the dramatic motive, all of which prove her mastery to be, 
very nearly, of the finest. But yet we are not satisfied. 
In this book we find truth, and truth that leaves a 
scar on the memory, but we do not find beauty. In "Mar- 
cella" truth and beau.v became interehangable. but in 
"The Story of Bessie Costrell" we have the truth, the 
horrible truth, standing alone to move to pity or to — a shud- 
der. It is a story of gloom, and it gives the heart a wrench. 
It is a simple story, as simple as the love of money among 
the poor, who. after a life-time of self-denial, succeed in 
"putting a few pounds together" only to look upon them 
as of exorbitant value, and to hide and hoard them from all 
eyes and ears but their own. There is the old farm 
laborer, John Bolderfield. who, after a life of toil, suc- 
ceeded in saving seventy pounds. Just think of it — seventy 
pounds! It represented a life of labor behind him, and a 
peaceful old age. And this money he conceals in a strong 
box under his bed. He would not trust "Savin' Banks or 
the loike." not he. After the stupid wont of his kind the 
old man thought his money was safe only where he could 
put his band on it, and so he clung to the strong box. Put 
it in a bank, indeed! "Nay, nay, I knows summit better 
nor that," and so he gave some of it out on interest, "a 
shillin' in the pound," never more, never less, and then 
only to people he knew well. But work failed the old man 
near his home. He was obliged to go some distance from 
his own village to get employment, and he could not be 
carrying seventy pounds, a fortune, the ransom for a king, 
in his eyes, around him. And so, going up his niece 
Bessie, the wife of an elderly man named Isaac Costrell, he 
said: "Look 'ere, Bessie, what 'ud you say if I war to ask 
Isaac and you to take care on it?" 

And here occurs one of the finest passages in the book, 
as the old man pauses, and Bessie is "startled," but 
pleased, at being asked to become the custodian of the 
money. But her husband, a good, plain man, did not 
want to " worrit" with other people's money. " Let them 
as owned it keep it; " filthy lucre was a snare to all who 
had to do with it, and it would only bring mischief in the 
house. 

"Oh, it's just like yer," Bessie flung at him at last in 
desperation; "you're alius the same — a mean-spirited fel- 
ler, stannin' in your children's way! Ow do you know who 
old John's 'gain to leave his money to ? Ow do you know 
as he wouldn't leave it to them poor innercents (she waved 
her hand tragically towards the children playing in the 
road) " if we was just a bit nice and friendly with him now 
'ee's gettin' old." 

And so at last old Isaac Costrell was conquered, although 
he protested that the lock on the box in which it was pro- 
posed to keep the money was not a " good un," and so the 
die was cast; the great event had taken place, old John 
Bolderfield went away to work in the ' ' far-off ' ' neighbor- 
hood, and the golden horde was left in care of honest old 
Isaac Costrell and his "caselty" wife, as the villagers 
used to call his fidgety spouse. And, as John Bolderfield 
walked away with the key of the box in his pocket, he felt 
satisfied that he had acted prudently and well. Mistaken 
John; poor Bessie Costrell, so keen at stealing money but 
so poor at hiding what she stole. She was young and 
good-looking. Her character was opulent; and this her 



poverty had repn Bsed, but had not destroyed. The temp- 
tation was too much I r her weak son], and she became a 

thief, finding a I etling the liox and to pilfer- the 

contents, it i- hen- Mrs. Ward displays her wonderful 
insight into human nature, as Bhe passes quickly from lies 
sie's surroundings t,, the heart of the woman's own nature. 
With her accustomed searching Into the connection between 
the soul and its environment, she shows us Bessie In her 
decaying virtue, and from this poinl we follow her from 
the blank irresponsibility <>f her previous dull and unevent- 
ful life to the groanings of weary guilt; and Mrs. Ward 
does this in a way which Balzac might have made more 
picturesque, but which even he could nol have made more 

at ■ more bitter, And as Bessie, the one-time 

fairly good Bessie, 1 ontinues to pilfer the hoard, she com- 
mences to drink more than was her wont, and, occasion- 
ally, she would "stand treat " at the village "pub." But 

we will leave Bessie and follow John Bolderfield. The 
" job " he went to take was finished, and he set, his face 
towards his own village again. Once there he made for 
the Costrell cottage, and. on opening the box, found only 
two sovereigns left I He fainted, and, when he recovers, 
stands face to face with Bessie. 

"Yogi me my money back," he said, holding out a 
shaking hand. 'Yer can't 'ave spent it all — taint possible — 
or yer ain't chucked it out o' winder. Yer've got it some- 
where 'idden an' I'll get it out o' you if I die for it." 

" What yer 'aven't got, yer can't give," she said. "I 
doan know nothin' about it on I've tole yer. There's plenty 
o' bad people in the world — beside me. Somebody came 
in o' nights, I suppose, an' picked the lock — there's many 
as 'ud think nothing of it. And it 'ud be easy done — we 
all sleeps .'ard." 

But the truth comes out. Step by step Bessie's pilfer- 

ings were traced, while her good husband pleaded with her 

to tell the truth and " ah done we it." And she did, and 

soon after committed suicide by jumping into a well, her 

husband refusing to forgive her to the end. Poor old 

John Bolderfield was cared for in his broken-hearted old 

age by a friend, and Isaac Costrell lived a life depressed 

by sorrow. It is a sad story, with a sordid atmosphere 

which finally overwhelms it in a gloom of poignant horror, 

and the author appeals to pity and terror to purge the 

emotions. This is the business of tragedy. But is this all 

the great writers of tragedy attempt ? Do they not, 

generally, give, us peace and a refuge in the end ? When 

we finish their books we are harrowed, torn, miserable, 

but we are, too, made stronger by the moral beauty of the 

end. This is something Mrs. Ward denies us, and so we 

close the pages of this book, wondering at the marvelous 

faithfulness with which it pictures peasant life in England, 

but all the sadder for having opened it at all. 

* '* Tlie Story of Bessie Costrell," by Mrs . Humphrey Ward. Macmillan 
& Co. Sold at Doxey's, 731 Market street. 

The J. F. Cutter Bourbon is one of the best Kentucky brands of 
whiskey. It is popular with the trade, and is the purest to be found 
in the market. The well-known firm, B. Martin & Co., 411 Market 
street, to which place they have recently moved, are the Pacific 
Coast agents. They also are agents for and keep the Argonaut brand 
of Kentucky Bourbon. 

Don't put up with smoking 
or smelly lamps or breaking 
chimneys. 

Write Geo A Macbeth Co, 
Pittsburgh, Pa, for "Index to 
Chimneys"; and make your 
dealer get the right shape 
and size and glass. 

Pearl glass, pearl top, tough 
glass. 

A. F. dOHNS X CO., 
Financial Agents, 

Dealers in Bonds and Securities. MONEY LOANED. 

632 Market street, room 9. San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1895. 




LAST year and the year before the short skirt was al- 
most universally worn, says the Paris correspondent 
of 'lie Brooklyn Eagle, but they have been found danger- 
ous and most inconvenient and this year trousers have 
been adopted by almost every wheel woman. When it is 
windy the skirts impede the rapidity of riding; then it is 
liable to rlv up and the exposure becomes much greater 
than the limb clothed with baggy trousers. I have had 
several friends who discussed the. inconvenience of skirts 
with rather disagreeable experiences. Not having learned 
to hold the handle bar with one hand and seeing their 
skirt above their knees, they intuitively let go the handle 
bar and were able to pull down their skirt only when they 
had sprawled on the ground. Skirts are dangerous on 
wheels where chains are not guarded. In the wind even a 
short skirt is apt to be caught in the chain and then a fall 
is inevitable. The great majority of the French women 
mount a man's wheel. They are preferred because of 
their greater solidity, and naturally it is impossible to 
mount such a wheel with skirts. 

The work of properly caring for a wheel is not great, 
and a few simple rules carefully followed out would save 
many dollars in repair bills, says " Cycling West.'' First, 
clean your wheel every day it is in use. Wipe the dust 
carefully from the frame, and especially from the axles, 
pedals and crank boxes. Keep the chain clean and well 
oiled. It should not be too tight nor too loose. Once a 
week the chain should be taken from the wheel, soaked in 
a little coal oil or gasoline, wiped clean and then soaked in 
cycle oil, so that all the man}' joints may be well oiled. 
This will prevent a broken chain, and perhaps a broken 
limb. If a chain is in need of oil it will become tight on 
the sprocket wheels and the wheel will run hard. 

The boom cycling has taken this 3 r ear will make the 
'wheelmen's vote'' of considerable more importance than 
any other during the coming campaign. Shrewd politicians 
will not let the opportunity pass to make a bid for this 
by offering improved highways and other things which the 
wheelmen have been fighting for for years, and it will be 
strange if in State or county elections it does not become 
a matter of great importance in which the two rival 
parties will make an effort to outbid each other. It is 
easy to promise almost anything before election. 

The French leave the mania for light machines to the 
Americans. The English, who are more practical and 
who are more competent in regard to wheels, have not 
followed the mistakes that the manufacturers of New 
York and Chicago have made, and the papers devoted to 
bicycling and which have no object in advertising one 
wheel in preference to another, have always warned their 
readers from purchasing bicycles too light in weight. 

A cyclometer does not add much weight, and for an 
observing cyclist this instrument adds much to the inter- 
est of the season. It is an excellent precaution to always 
have a tool-bag with the necessaries for repairs of all 
kinds to which the cyclist is exposed. How many times 
have wheelmen been seen broken down upon the road, who 
had neglected to provide themselves with a tool-bag. 

Amateur or tourists' machine should not be without an 
efficient brake. And the rage that the cyclists have had 
for some time for taking off their brakes can only briny 
disaster — a result that is injurious to the advance oi ■ 7. 

in the minds of the public. 

The low shoe is preferred to the high shoe; the ordinary 
walking shoe, with a low heel, is worn more than the one' 
used only for bicycling, that is, the soft low shoe with no 
heel, a strap on the instep and another around the ankle. 

Alcohol is an enemy of the cyclist. It is bad for the 
exercise and makes the fatigue more rapid and complete 

Twenty-four new styles of banquet lamps and piano lamps re- 
ceived yesterday. Twelve new styles of onyx tables, from $»; to $'-'5 
each. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 



western Premier cycle 60. 

(INCORPORATED.) SAN FRANCISCO 

DIRECTORS: Samuel W. Backus, President; Edward P. Slosson, Sec- 
retary: L. R EUert, John N. Sherburne, L. W. Sanborn. 

General agents lor the Pacitic Coast for the PREMIER CYCLE MANU- 
FACTURING CO. The -inly wheel backed by impartial tests of the Ord- 
nance Department. TJ. S. Government. See Government Tests printed in 

our catalogue. 

Three highest awards at 
World's Fair 1803. 

HELICAL TUBE PRE- 
MIERS: No other mauulac- 
turer can use the Helical 
Tube. The highest ^rade. 
finest, and sirouj-'est bicycle 
in the world. 



!^^ The Premier Gucleru 

Has just completed the finest 
cyclery on the coasc, on Baker 
street, directly opposite the 
panhandle of the Park, and 
have introduced mauy new 
features. Elegant accommo- 
dations have been provided 
for ladies and gentlemen, who 
can have every comfort and 
convenience. Lockers are 
furnished for patrons, and 
their wheels will be carefully 
cared for and repaired when 
necessary. Shower baths and 
dressing rooms have been 
provided, and competent 
teachers will attend to the 
instructions of new riders. 

The renting, repairing, and 
care of wheels will bemade a 
special feature of the estab- 
lishment. 

PREMIER CYCLERY, 312-314 Baker St., s. f. 

Or to Collins & Co., 1018 Market st.; C. F. Cormack, 1006 Valencia st. ; G. W. 
Glosser, 1718 Devisadero st. ; R J. Harrison, 439 McAllister st. 
"Ask the conductor to let you oft at Baker street " 




Depot, Salesroom, and Cyclery. 
East entrance to Panhandle of Park 

Send all orders to 



RflM5LER 5I6YGLES 



Are Pre-eminent. 



G. & J. Tires 
Wood Rims 
Steel Rims 
Copper Rims 




No. 10. weight 15 and 18 lbs 

> No. 14, weight 22 pouDds 

|z No. 12, weight 25 pounds 

' S Ladies' E, weight 19V4 lbs 

|5 Ladies 1 D, weight 24 lbs 



Time H R UAPMEV 13 25 Market Street. San Franciscc 
1 \\[)b. II. D. VrilVllL/, 427 S. Spring Street, Los Angeles 



TH0S. L KENT, 

597 Mission St. 

San Francisco, Cal. Cor. Second. 

LADIES and 



GENTLEMEN'S 



BiGyfle 
Suits 



TO ORDER ONLY. 




Augu>.t 3, 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'9 



Biraia Fair's Tlir following .'!.-. riptim 'linlii- 

Costume. Pair's the Washington 

~lmrt at 6 
plump, anil she is 11 thing when -I «■ stai 

ipin. Kir>t .if a!!, after her morning dip and 
h- ilons an undprgunnoiil of heavy r 
silk Over this her maid arr skirt of jrra\ 

and the very full bloomers of gray tweed, which are war- 
ranted not to show a speck of dust, no matter hov 
and hot the ride. Her trimly fitting leggings of gray 
Buede are jn-t the color and scarcely thicker than th 

she wears. For covering her pretty 
head >lie lias bicycling caps which can only be distinguished 
from yachting headgear by the absence of anchors and the 
presence of tiny gold and silver wrought miniature wheels. 
A kmg sail; coat of tweed, silk lined, is always carried 
wrapped and strapped in front of the wheel to be 

donned when the breeze grows Stiff or when there is a sud- 
den downpour. Miss Fair favors above all other suits this 
symphony in gray which goes so well with her bewitching 
brunette loveliness, but she ha* a different color and com- 
bination for every day in a wl week. One in golden 

brown serge and silk and another in all cornflower blue 
Irish poplin, are lovely to look upon and delieiously cool 
and dust proof. The silver name plates are universally 
used, but instead of the name of the fair owner being em- 
blazoned on the silver the name of the bicycle is used. 
Miss Fair's is "Fleetwing," probably from her pet name 
Birdie. 

G. A. Xissen, of Alameda, broke the world's record for 
ten miles (competitive unpaced) in the Acme Road Race 
last Sunday, in the phenomenal time of 25 minutes and 45 
seconds. This beats the previous record by nearly a minute. 
To-morrow Mr. Xissen will try for the forty-four mile re- 
cord between Oakland and San Jose. He will ride under 
the colors of the Diamond Cycling Club of Alameda, and 
will be paced by four tandem teams. 

From an athletic standpoint and for obtaining the best 
results for health, it is better to make frequent runs, than 
to go on long excursions. A bath with friction and 
massage, when it is possible after the exercise, adds to 
the good effects. 

One of the best authorities on the subject says that 
there must be almost one million wheels to-day in the 
United States. 

Road machines should not have a high gear. 

Champagne and Frenchmen. 
A decided partiality for the better grades of champagne seems to 
have possessed the French people of late. While formerly sparkling 
wine was either conspicuously absent on the menus, or a thing of 
rare occurrence (unless Tisane, with the fish), dinners and smaller 
affairs nowadays would not be complete without a brand of well- 
known merit. The impetus to this change of taste seems to have 
been given by the deceased President Carnot, who was an ardent 
admirer of the better products of the champagne country. Mr. Vas- 
nier, the manager of the Pommery establishment, received the Order 
of the Legion d'Honneur at the hands of Carnot. At the recent ban- 
quet, on the occasion of President Faure's reception by the exhibitors 
of wines at Bordeau, Pommery Bee again flowed in abundance, and, 
to judge from the quantity consumed in France at present, the home 
consumption of fine champagne promises to grow steadily. 




Could J have another 
Glass of that 

HIRES' 

Rootbeer! 

Give the children as much 
Hires' Rootbeer as they want. 
Take as much as you want, your- 
self. There's no harm in it — 
nothing but good. 

A 25 cen I package makes 5 gallons. 

The Chas. E. Hires Co., Philada. 



ANNUAL MEETING 
Alta Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Alta Silver Min- 
ing Company will beheld at the office of the company, room 33, Nevada 
Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, CaL, on Thursday, the 

15th DAY OF AUGUST, 1895, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Mon- 
day, August 12th, at 3 o'clock p. M. J. E. JACOBUS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Momtgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Latest Novelty. 

TheLadies' BICYCLE SUIT of the Golden West. 

Any Villus Ap Franrp MAISON TRUFFEBT, 

mux vines ub rrdiiue, 60g Taylor St., between Sutter and Post. 



W&.WMWH S^NKN NtSV NNIt.. 



The Miger, 



Weight 20 Lbs. Price, $130. 



The Daintiest 
Ladies' Wheel 
On the Market. 



It is the highest product of the manufacturer's art. Light 
and handsome, and made of only the very finest of material. 
It is a hand-made machine. 



HOOKER & CO., 



CYCLE DEALERS, 

16-18 Drumm Street. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1895. 







RUMOR has it that many of the late summer and new 
fall dresses will be cut in one piece, shirred at the 
waistline aud around the shoulders. "C-repon is going 
out," has been the cry of late, but if this style should 
flourish at all crepons will still be in demand as only such 
light weight wools could be well used. The redingote 
costume with several shoulder capes is another promised 
fashion The Marie Antoinette sleeve, shown already on 
a few imported models, clings quite close to arm, almost 
entirely without fulness, and is of course a marked con- 
trast to the flaring affair, which has been so long in favor. 
Suits with capes of the same material will be seen among 
the early fall models. 

In making up thin goods, like muslins or organdies, don't 
undertake to have trimming on the skirt at all. In the 
imported gowns this year not more than two in a 
hundred have had any skirt trimming. When it has ap- 
peared it has been in the form of fine embroidery on the 
Beams, with Vandykes of lace running down from the 
waist in panel shape. It is much better however, to 
make up the skirts very plainly. Some of the waists are 
made up prettily with lace insertions sewed in every few 
inches between strips of the muslin, lace edging to match be- 
ing, of course, used on the sleeves, collar and shoulder 
ruffles, if any. 

Never were articles de luxe so numerous or so elegant. 
The silk umbrella has become a thing of beauty. Its gold 
handle, so delicately wrought, slender and gracefully 
modeled, is a covetable treasure. Not only in gold, but 
jade mountings and interwoven gold supports, and other 
artistic conceptions, are among the extravagant examples. 
Yet no ostentation, only perfect taste prevails. 

The extensive use of fancy velvets will be a decided 
feature of the autumn modes. The Louis XVI jacket suits 
of brocade and plain silks, which are the most swagger 
things out now, will be made later on of th se fancy vel- 
vets and plain satin. 

The manufacturing of imitation stones has reached a 
point of perfection in France, and the question of good 
taste in using them seems no longer considered. 

Takpetas will not be quite so conspicuous in the fall as 
they have been, for satin is coming in, both plain and 
quaintly figured. 

Sashes of double chiffon are very popular and are some- 
times edged by a ruche of satin ribbon. 

Imitation velvets are introduced among the uew wools. 
They are very handsome. 

For water gowns, duck, pique and brown linen may be 
recommended as effective and modish material. Blue 
denim, the very same blue denim economical housekeepers 
use to carpet summer floors, is also seen, but since denim 
discolors and crumples easily, it is not advised as a useful 
yachting stuff. 

Cotton guipure, made up over a colored lining, makes 
delightful toilets for the country and seaside. There is 
also a transparent material brocaded with garlands and 
bouquets in lovely shades, which makes very dressy toilets 
with a lining of taffeta or satin. 

In France where brilliancy of hue is so much in vogue, a 
mohair yachting frock in cardinal red is said to be the 
latest tiling, ami a costume in this tint and texture, lately 
seen, was by no means the bizarre affair one would im- 
agine. 

If one hates the restraints of ordinal - }' woman's gear, 
and wants to have a really good time, irrespective 61 
clothes, a sweater and short, full skirt, will be found to 
contribute much toward the bliss of house-boat life. 



In Paris, Vienna, and London, women of fashion consider the 
decoration of their " Love-locks," as Swinburne would call them. 
But in S.ui Francisco, where we have Goldstein & Conn, we are not 
only repeating the fashions of the fin df siecle of Europe, but we are, 
at the same time, setting fashions in hair-dressing which are putting 
them to shame. 



Great 
Sacrifice- 



Clearance 
Sale 



NOW IN PROGRESS. 



Everything at 

Forcing-out 

Prices, 



See daily papers for particulars. 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bat. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



New Whatcom, 



Washington, 



Is at the head of Bellingham Bay, on Puget Sound. It is the North- 
west City of the State of Washington; population about 10,000. 
It is the third city in size and wealth in Western Washington. All 
its industries are thriving. 

IT HAS ADVANTAGES possessed by no other point in the State of 
Washington; the country is rich in coal, iron, and other minerals; 
it is rich in agricultural and timber land; the city is lighted by 
electricity; it has two electric street car lines; the water supply is 
from a large mountain lake 316 feet above the city front; the quan- 
tity of water is unlimited, and is used to drive machinery for 
manufacturing purposes. For domestic use it is unequaled. 

NEW WHATCOM is the home of the Bellingham Bay and British Colum- 
bia Railroad, and of the Bellingham Bay and Eastern Railroad; 
it is the American terminus of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and 
the Pacific Coast terminus of the Great Northern Railroad; the 
Northern Pacific Railroad is making preparations to enter the city; 
its harbor is one of the best in the world; the steamships of the 
Pacific Coast S. S. Company for the North all go there; steamers 
arrive at and depart daily from New Whatcom for all ports on 
Puget Sound. 



It is the Coming Great City. 



Gold. _ Silver. 

Chas. F. Blackburn, E, M., 



Practical Mining Geologist, 



Weaverville, 



Trinity County, Cal. 



Metal. 



i inki mines ol any description Specialty—Free milling 
quartz gold lodes and Large bodies of hydraulic placer gold 
deposits Prices low and easy terms. Big profits suit, as 
I handle none but dividend-payers aud am careful in the 
selection of good properties only Will examine and report 
oumiucsiu this region or elsewhere More than so years' 
mining and geological experlenoe Terms low 



Mineral. 



P. & B. 



FRUIT DRYING 
PAPER. 



Paraffine Paint Co., 



116 Battery St., S. F., Cal. 



Align 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



THE DEATH OF A THRILL. 



I AM the soul of a Thrill. 
1 died yesterday a- a Thrill, being bora to day oe a 
My other birth .1- a Thrill happened upon the 
day they met. Ju.-t at the Up ol her slim fingers she frit 
me tingle, ami then, before Bbe had time to think. I ran on 
up her arm— that beautiful arm and directly to ber 
that beat "lit which 1 stirred. 

He is my idol," she said to herself that nighl staring 
with 1 - into the green depths of her mirror. 

"Our souls knew each other ;it sight. ' 

This was absurd, but it was not my business to tell her 
conscientious, and realizing my duty. 1 ran 
about from heart to brain, and back again, weaving a 
tine web about her common sense. 1 colored her face and 
throat with warm crimson. I melted thought to vapor in 
her humid eyes, and stole into her voice, making it like a 
lute with one string, and that golden. Thrills can do this. 
And it is a grand, good thing to be a live Thrill and sing a 
song of fools. 

So I lived on all through the summer, until she found the 
sleeping child in her nature was awake. And I knew that 
it would never sleep again. 

And all of this time she saw Him — not as he was — but 
as she thought he was. And 1 knew that when she knew 
the truth 1 should die. 

Heigh-ohl Thrills lead a precarious existence! For a 
time 1 ran amuck. And because I did she thought she 
loved. Foolish girl! All of that time her little white soul 
was sitting high up on a sort of ladder which was braced 
against a star. Aud it held its .immaculate skirts very 
high and close, and turned up its nose at me. At no time 
during the whole affair was I on good terms with her soul. 
But she thought we were intimate friends. Girls are such 
fools! 

But the end — that curious thing — came. Thrills do not 
live — as Thrills — forever. 

'' He is my idol ! " she had so constantly cried. 

But one night, when I lay swimming in a tear, she said 
most bitterly: 

" His feet are clay ! " 

After that I became a very feeble Thrill. I could never 
see what his clay feet had todo with me, nor could I under- 
stand what she had expected of her idol. Have they not 
all feet of clay ? Even Buddha sits upon his to hide them. 
Girls are so queer ! 

One night I saw her soul shaking out its clean skirts, 
and climbing down the ladder which was still braced 
against a fiery star. 

" It was an infatuation ! " exclaimed the girl, " and my 
soul had nothing to do with it ! " 

And the look her soul gave me as it came down from the 
ladder was so scornful that I died of the pain of it. And 
here I am a — gnat. I can thrill no longer, but only sting. 

Stranger, you may see us in swarms upon any warm 
summer night admiring the young moon, who is the only 
God we worship. And we circle about so crazily that any 
thoughtful person might be reasonably sure we are the 
souls of dead Thrills. 

I do not know what I shall be in my next life. I should 
not have performed my duty as a Thrill if I had known 
that I was to be a gnat — or a regret — which is the same 
thing, and I presume I should not fulfill the object pf my 
existence as a gnat if I knew what was to be my next in- 
carnation. 

I can only circle about wildly, realizing that my time is 
indeed short — as the cool of the year is here — and piously 
say: 

"The moon — she knows best!' 

— Johanna Staats in Vanity. 

Visit Laundry Farm, 
the terminus of the California Railway, Alameda County, for a pleas- 
ant day's outing. It is one of the most picturesque spots around the 
bay. No Sunday dancing and no liquors sold on the grounds. 

The fashionable people of the city all go to 139 Post street, on the 
first floor of Liebes' building, to leave tneirorders with P. F. McNulty 
for a pair of neat-fitting, comfortable shoes. He keeps up with the 
styles aud is careful in giving satisfaction to his customers, and 
this has given him the reputation of being the leader in the business. 



The A B C 

of Good Cooking. 



Always use 
Cottolcnc, the new 
shortening, for all 
' cooking purposes. 
FGood cooks who hnvc i 
I tried it never go back j 
to anything 
else. 



Better 
cooking, better 
food, better health 4 
is 

brought to any home^ 

by Cottolene. Will yon J 

have it in yours ? 




Sold in S and 6 pound palls, by all grooms, 
Made only by 
The N. K. Fall-bank 
Company ( 




Clilcngo,Nevr York* 
Boston* 



Pacific Towel Gompanu. 



Lick Place 



Furnishes clean Towels at the following low rates: Clean hand 
towels each week, $1 per month; 12 clean hand towels each week; 
$1 50 per month; 4 clean roller towels each week, $1, 6 months, 
6 clean roller towels each week, $1 25 per month. 

CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

CANDIES. 
CANDIES. ^Don't leave the city without a box of ROBERTS' Best. 

DENTISTS. 
R. Cutlar, 412>4 Post street. 

DRUGGISTS. 
Evans's Poison Oak Specific. Positive cure. Sold by all druggists. 

RESTAURANTS. 
Franco-American Restaurant, 5S1 Montgomery street. F. Hitte. 



VOCAL, CULTURE. 
Miss Caroline Shlndler, Soprano. Vocal Culture. Hours, 1 to 3, 2416 Clay 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 

Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 

Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollis Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 0'Farrell St., S. F. 



For the best value in 




HATS or CAPS 
Go to 

G. Herrmann & Go. 

The Hatters, 

328 Kearny St., 
Near Pine. (Entire Building) 

The ONLY Retail Hatters 
having their own factory. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 3, 1895. 




BANKING. 



FOR THEE.— Francis saltus. 

FOR thee was always my awakening thought, 
For thee the prayer that soothed me ere I slept, 
For thee the smiles that Hope but seldom brought, 
For thee the many bitter tears 1 wept. 

For thee my life I gladly would cast down, 

And for thy love would pay Death's fatal pnce- 

Thou, my sweet consolation and my crown; 
Thou, my despair, my hope, my Paradise. 

For thee, oh my unsullied, stainless goal, 
1 live to-day, and for one perfect kiss 

From thy warm lips I would give my soul 
And life in worlds hereafter and in this. 

For thee from sin I would not even shrink; 

For thee I would not tremble before death; 
For thee I'd perish, if I once could sink 

And die upon the perfume of thy breath. 

Thou art my hope, my future and my past; 

Thou art my sweet torture and delight; 
Thou art my only love, the first, the last; 

Thou art my radiant dawn, my starry night. 

Spurn not my passion that will e'er abide, 

Boundless and vast and constant as the sea, 

But rather pity in thy conscious pride 

A love more strong than Death itself, for thee. 

LONGING.— FROM DAUGHTERS OF AMERICA. 

for the power of days prophetic! 

To touch Time's shadow and bid it stay; 
To slop the earth in its tireless journey, 

And make to-morrow be still to-day ! 
but to hold in grasp unyielding 

The perfect moment that crowns the year. 
And undismayed to face the future 

With heart untouched by thrill of fear ! 

O but to launch on a waveless ocean, 

With wind that never should change or fail, 
With youth and fate and hope for cargo, 

To spread to the wind my snowy sail! 
To speed, with never a backward glancing, 

Away from the old familiar shore, 
With sin and sorrow and pain behind me 

And naught but an endless light before! 
To gather the friends I love beside me, 

With no stern Fortune to bid us part; 
No shadow to dim the sunny faces, 

No change to sever us, heart from heart ! 
To know no more — no more forever. 

The touch of passion, of want and care; 
To turn my face from the land I'm leaving 

And know that death stands powerless there. 



ON THE MARGIN OF THE NILE— cv warman in hew vork sun 

I had banqueted at Berlin, seen a festival in Rome, 
Had a midnight lunch in London, and a heap o' things at home ; 
But 1 never knew what life was till I lingered for awhile, 
Where they used to have a harem on the margin of the Nile. 
Where the swaying palm and pepper fling their graces on the air, 
And the moaning camel kneels to take the burden he must bear; 
And, rising, shakes his silvery bells and shuffles down the file, 
Where they used to have a harem on the margin of the Nile. 
Where dreamy, dark-eyed women came to loiter in the leaves 
That begirt Ghezireh Palace. "Where, like rain from dripping eaves 
Runs the endless song of summer; for the heavens seem to smile 
Where they used to have a harem on the margin of the Nile. 



A NEW VERSION.— alice Wellington rollins. 

Young love is calm ; it is so sure 
It never, never, can be harmed; 

Serenely gazing on before, 

It sees the future unalarmed. 

Old love is blither; it has been 

Sore wounded in the race for life; 

And so it laughs aloud, to win 

And still live, after so much strife. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 
Capital Paid Up, $3,000,000. Reserve Fund and Undivided Profits, SI ,410,000 

Southeast Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 
HEAD OFFICE 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches — Victoria. Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan- 
iamo, and Nelson, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Ta- 
coma, Washington. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Omee and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland — Bank of Ireland; Mexico — London Bank of Mexico; 
South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of 
Sydney, Ld; Demerara and Thinidad (West Indies) — Colonial Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits, June 30, 1894 884,061,791 27. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,627,052 48. 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B POND, Vice-President 

Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Ohice hours— 9. A. M. to 3 p. M. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity. 100.000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class companies, or grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 302 Sansome St., over the Anglo-California Bank. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California St., S. F. 

Capital actually paid up in Cash, $1,000,000. Reserve Fund $ 685.000 

Deposits, June 29, 1895, $30,472,837 66. Guaranteed Capital. .$1,200,000 

OFFICERS— President, Edward Kruse; Vice-President, B. A. Becker; 
Second Vice-President, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Touruy Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Muller. 

Board of Directors— Edward Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Shoemann, 
A. C. Heineken, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steinhart, 
Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Capital authorized $6,000,000 I Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fuud 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

WELLS, FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sdtter Streets. 

Cash Capital and Surplus S6.250.00O 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier I F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

SSS Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 

Wm. Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin A. K. P. Harmon 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones J. B. Lincoln. 

CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OT SAN francisco. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid-Up Capital 81,000,000. 

WM. H.CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond. 



August 3, 1895. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



23 



SUNBEAMS 1 



Thk Bumnrar girl. aooompanM bj her mother, doouuded from 
the train at the Springs station ami looked about her. Then she 
beckoned to a man driving a two-seated wagon. "Sorry, Miss," he 
responded, "but I'm engaged." A >hadow ot dla»ppolntment fell 
over the face o( the girl. 'Momuier." she exrlaitm-it, "this is no 
place form. The men are so scarce that even the btck-driven are 
engaged." At the station beyond, Ihe outlook was less dishearten- 
ing —Truth. 

"Nil." said Smallwort. who was taking his ease under his own 
vine and fig tree. "no. I won't giTe yon anything to eat, but if you 
willdosome work 1 will giTe you a quarter it) cash." "Do yon 
know." -si. I BvaraM Wrest, • thai I've got a mighty good 
case agin you fer attempted bribery, if 1 only felt like pushing it?" 
—Cincinnati Tribune. 

Tom, Tom the swiper's son, 

Stole some cash, and away he run, 

He struck a gait 

For Canada straight, 

And he hasn't been heard from up to date. 

— Peck's Sun. 

"Ah, my darling wife, if your husband were to die, what would 
you do?" "I don't know, I'm sure, George; 1 never thought of that. 
1 must look into my 'Book of Etiquette,' and read the rales for 
young widows. — Standard. 

Miss Hockheimer— No, Mr. Pinkenberg, I am sorry, but I can- 
not. I could never love a man wilh red hair. Mr. Pinkenberg— 
Dot vas nothing. My barber tells me I will be completely bald in 
one year.— Standard. 

We have an idea that we will purchase a bicycle after a while. 
We know of a good place to get the wind with which to fill the tires. 
— West Union (Iowa) Gazette. 

Thomas— Have they named the twins over at your house yet? 
John— Yep, pa called them Thunder and Lightning as soon as he 
heard about them.— Truth. 

My landlady's daughter has a wheel, 

And down the street she flies, 
Meanwhile the dear old girl herself 
Gives us pneumatic pies. 

— Cincinnati Tribune. 

Married-How do yon like these photographs of my mother-in-law ? 
Single— They are very good of her; I prefer this one. Married— 
Yes, so do I. She always looks well in a travelling dress.— Humor- 
istische Blatter. 

Foreigner— Thought you had no titles in America; here's a man 
puts "Jr." after his name. Citizen— That means "junior." For- 
eigner— Excuse me; I thought it was "janitor."— St. Louis Globe 
Democrat. 

" I am very sorry, Karl, you don't admire my new frock. Every- 
body says it is charming." "Your friends, my dear, pay you com- 
pliments. I pay your bills."— Lustige Blatter. 

"MAKiN'any money off eryer summer boarders?" "Ami? Well 
say! I'm lettin' every new boarder teach me how ter play poker." 
—Judge. 

All hail the fin-de-siecle girl 1 

Though fashion has reduced her 
To wearing bustles on her arms 
Instead of like she useter.— Ex. 

Father— Your mother complains that you are impudent. Why 
don't you do what she tells you? Little Son— Because I'm not 
married to her. — Standard. 

Applicant— I always attend to my own business. Merchant— 
You won't suit me. I want clerks to attend to my business.— Tid- 
Bits. 

Grace— Cholly proposed to me last night. Ethel— Indeed ! 
Why.you never told me you had studied hypnotism.— Syracuse Post. 

The Grand Canon Line !— To the East ! 



Commencing Nov. 4th the "Santa Fe Route" Popular Overland 
Excursions to Chicago and Eastern Cities will leave every Wednesday. 
Manager in Charge. Through Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleep- 
ers are run to Chicago every day. This is the only Line by which the 
Grand Canon of the Colorado River can be reached. Send for illus- 
trated book giving full particulars. C. H. Speers, A. G. P. A., 650 
Market street, Chronicle Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Gentlemen who wish a supply of underwear, neckties, collars, 
cutis, and shirts, should call on John W. Carmany, 25 Kearny street. 
He also keeps in stock a supply of ladies' shirts. All his goods are of 
the finest quality. 



BANKING. 



CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST CO. 

Paid-up Otpltal, fn.ooo.ouo. 

lAiHNRH MMVn..-\UKY ASH t'Al.l KOKN1 A S'lS,. S. F. 

OFFICERS .1 D Fry, President; Bear; Williams, Vloo-Presldent; J. 
lmUeii Brown, Seorotarj >vnd TroMarer. 

Authorised by i;»w to sol as Kxooutor, Administrator and Trustee under 
•Tills, ;i>- Quftrdian ol estnii-s ui lnamii><i<-iit persons ami minors, ns 
Assignee <>r Receiver, <>r In any Other ttusl capacity, ami Is a legal deposi- 
tory for court ami trust Fond 

At (cuds to the collection of Interest, dividends, rents, etc.. for residents 
or others. 

Aiis as Trustee of mortgages of corporations and individuals, and accepts 
the transfer sgenoy and registry of Btocks. 

Receives deposits subject to eheoh and allows interest on daily balances. 
Issues oerttfloates of deposits bearing fixed rates of interest. Receives 
deposits in its Barings department. 

Wills drawn and taltcn can- of without Charge. 
information and ad\ ice re^unllng trust matters cheerfully given. 
SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to ivni at prices from $5 per annum upward, 
according to size, and valuables of ail kinds aro stored at low rates. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,01X1,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (October 1, 1804) . . 3.158,129 70 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP.. Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS B